Allman scale?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by angus99, Jan 29, 2008.


  1. angus99

    angus99 Member

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    Did I dream this or was there a thread on the "Allman scale" here a while back? Can't find it in the archives. I'm trying to work out the second solo in Jessica and I think it's D major pentatonic.

    Thnx

    angus
     
  2. jpastras

    jpastras Supporting Member

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    I'm not super familiar with their music, but I have the first album. The "prettier" stuff is mostly major pentatonic and mixolydian, which share a lot of the same notes.
     
  3. JoeP

    JoeP Member

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    Dorian, and Hexatonic..............
     
  4. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    All these can be used over Whippin Post and/or In Memory of Elizabeth Reed:

    A minor pentatonic
    A-C-D-E-G

    A Minor
    A-B-C-D-E-F-G

    A Dorian
    A-B-C-D-E-F#-G

    A Minor Hexatonic
    A-C-D-E-F#-G

    Duane messed around with Bmin pentatonic which gave it a cool sound:

    B-D-E-F#-A - same as A dorian and hex in one sense but focusing on the 9th of A ming

    Dickie also used to like to hang on the b5 (Eb) in some of these scales.


    Duane used a lot of the major pentatonic over some blues which added a different flavor to his playing.
     
  5. sweepsrost

    sweepsrost Member

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    Serious Question.

    Why would you say a hexatonic,Minor ,Dorian? They share pretty much the same notes.

    Wouldnt Mixolydian and Blues Scale cover it?
    I just doubt they thought that deep into it and mostly played blues ya know.
     
  6. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Yup, D major pent. Standard country scale.
     
  7. kimock

    kimock Member

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    Try D E F# G A B D. That's probably what they mean when they say "Allman scale".
    You can think of it as two triads, D major and E minor alternating if you want. "Triad pair", right? So, one more note than the D pentatonic. You have a G in there.
    If you harmonize some licks with this scale you'll get a pretty distinctive ABB style harmony.
    I love that stuff. . .;)

    peace
     
  8. Ed DeGenaro

    Ed DeGenaro Supporting Member

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    Major Pentatonic with the 4 in it (major scale without the 7).
    As in over D major...d,e,f#,g,a, b
     
  9. Ed DeGenaro

    Ed DeGenaro Supporting Member

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    Didn't see your post, beat be to it...
     
  10. angus99

    angus99 Member

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    That's it! Thanks very much, Steve & all.
     
  11. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    Nope, Dickie calls it hexatonic, I got it from a lesson he posted in Gtr World I think.
     
  12. procos

    procos Supporting Member

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    When I read this stuff I never understand what people are talking about. I never understood theory. I just play what sounds right. I wish I knew more about theory. Any suggestions on a good learning book that talks in layman terms for us less brilliant players?
     
  13. Ed DeGenaro

    Ed DeGenaro Supporting Member

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    There's a book called something along the lines of How To Write Hit Songs that actually does a decent job of introducing novices to usable rudimentary theory.
     
  14. procos

    procos Supporting Member

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    I guess I didn't give myself enough credit. I do understand how the guitar or piano works. I actually took piano lessons for 6 years from age 8-14. What I get confused over is moving it to the guitar. I guess I'll check out the book and see where it takes me.

    Chuck
     
  15. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Just to clarify:
    The scale used in the melody of Jessica is A major pentatonic with added 4th (A B C# D E F#) - which you can call A major (or mixolydian) with missing 7th, or A hexatonic if you like - and it's harmonised mostly in 3rds (with the occasional E-A 4th).
    The bridge is in G major. (G major scale, that is, but over G and A major chords.)

    The scale used in the second solo section (over half-way through, in key of D, before the return to the head) is (mostly) D major pentatonic. There's the odd bluesy decoration (bending or sliding up to the 3rd), but not much evidence (if any) of the 4th, G.
     
  16. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Following on from my above post...

    They made a clear choice in "Jessica" to go with the bright sound of major pent. There is no 7th at all in the scale used for the main tune. It's pretty clearly a conscious choice, because even in the harmony they use the same 6-note scale - careful to avoid the G (or G# of course), and no blues b3 (C).

    The tonality of the bridge is a little more bluesy, arguably: the chords alternate between G and A, and the scale (overall) is a combination of G major and A mixolydian. (A C natural is used over the G, but C# on the A - with one exception, a quick C 8th in a run on one of the As.)

    In the D major solo (later), it's a little more open, but he sticks pretty much to D major pent. It's a country sound, IOW, not a blues sound; although there's the occasional bend up to the major 3.

    Of course, you can use mixolydian or blues scale if you want! But it won't sound much like Jessica if you do... ;) (Mixolydian is close, but blues scale is quite different.)
     
  17. angus99

    angus99 Member

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    I often don't get it either, but I've committed to learn it. For a really basic (like I need) and free source on theory, check this out:

    http://lessons.mikedodge.com/

    He walks through it at about the pace I need.

    JonR, thanks for the details!

    angus
     
  18. jscorno

    jscorno Member

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  19. gtrchris

    gtrchris Member

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    oops, sorry wrong thread I was looking for the peanut scale:eek:

    Seriously, when did they start naming scales after 70's rock bands?
    I suppose there must be a Yes scale, a Bad scale,a Free scale and an Angus scale too.
     
  20. angus99

    angus99 Member

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    See original post. Quotation marks construe a certain informality, lack of precision or attribution--often to parties unknown. (But I do think I remembers somebody calling it that.)

    If you were from Brantford (like me) instead of Brampton, you'd know that . . . :BEER

    angus
     

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