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Allmans Stormy Monday- Who did the first solo?

Ritualee

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,151
Forgive my ignorance, please. Is that Duane doing the first solo on Stormy Monday? Has to be, right?

Thanks in advance.
 

lhallam

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
17,305
Both are great solos. Duane's is very interesting in his innovative use of major pentatonics.

Dickey's just flat out kills. Perfectly built up to climax on 5 quick notes and then eased off. One of my favorite solos of all time.

It's the drumming that truly controls the dynamics on this one. Excellent ensemble work.
 

DiazDude

Member
Messages
4,227
One of the greatest live recordings ever...thanks Tom Dowd!! And remember it's pieced from 2 different shows.
 

rwe333

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
16,392
Indeed!

Do you mean that "Stormy Monday" was pieced together...? I hadn't heard that.
I thought it was edited for length (losing the guest harmonica solo) over spliced from different nights...
Certainly there are splices from different shows on "The Filmore Concerts" (noted in the liner notes), though less so on "Live at the Filmore East".
I could be wrong...
I love both solos, though lean towards Dickey. I do find Duane sharp a fair bit (likely just the Doppler effect as he was loud - so not meant as a criticism).
 

jimmyj

Member
Messages
5,555
Looking at the liner notes from The Fillmore Concerts the only change to Stormy Monday was that they left out the harmonica solo on the original release. On this CD In Memory of Elizabeth Reed is spliced together from 2 different nights. The splice is right before Duane's solo.
BTW, as great as Duane's solo is on Stormy Monday, Dickey's is one of the perfect solos on record, IMO.
 

pete692

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,129
Anybody else really dig Duane's non-slide stuff on the Fillmore Concerts? He blows me away on Hot'lanta.
 

StompBoxBlues

Member
Messages
19,951
Both are great solos. Duane's is very interesting in his innovative use of major pentatonics.

Dickey's just flat out kills. Perfectly built up to climax on 5 quick notes and then eased off. One of my favorite solos of all time.

It's the drumming that truly controls the dynamics on this one. Excellent ensemble work.
They are both great... what kills me about Betts' solo, that SO easy going intro...the tone is just clean...wonderful, does that then down to the B on the 5th string...just "got all the time in the world...now I'm gonna tell you a story" feel, then a little blue note, hit the first string G, then second string bend from G that just stretches out time...just so delicate and yearning...and THEN...suddenly it's BB King on steroids, with the HAMMER ON...

I like to play touch, and if I ever have to explain to someone what it is I either play that or refer them to that solo beginning.

AND he builds so amazingly up from there...til the energy is (again I get reminded of several BB songs, one right off of "Live at the Regal", but I'm not saying it was lifted, just it had the same feel and dynamic) just about to burst...

I get amazed when folks say "I'm just not crazy about the Allman brothers version of it" because to me those two solos are like THE golden example of what slow blues solos are about. It's like a tutorial in slow blues.

I'm not as impressed with the organ solo in between, but I really admire their vision of the song, jazzing it up in the middle there I think adds to the back to blues feel of the second solo...it also makes the song even if it isn't my favorite part of it.

One other thing, talk about tutorial, the way the two guitars comp together is a whole lesson in what two guitars OUGHT to do instead of fighting each other, or just duplicating each other. They play so well together there....split up chords even to where one plays half, the other plays the other half of a "half chord"...let it breathe, no fighting for the pause or in-between phrases riffs...just elegant.
 

Dave Orban

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
16,866
They are both great... what kills me about Betts' solo, that SO easy going intro...the tone is just clean...wonderful, does that then down to the B on the 5th string...just "got all the time in the world...now I'm gonna tell you a story" feel, then a little blue note, hit the first string G, then second string bend from G that just stretches out time...just so delicate and yearning...and THEN...suddenly it's BB King on steroids, with the HAMMER ON...

I like to play touch, and if I ever have to explain to someone what it is I either play that or refer them to that solo beginning.

AND he builds so amazingly up from there...til the energy is (again I get reminded of several BB songs, one right off of "Live at the Regal", but I'm not saying it was lifted, just it had the same feel and dynamic) just about to burst...

I get amazed when folks say "I'm just not crazy about the Allman brothers version of it" because to me those two solos are like THE golden example of what slow blues solos are about. It's like a tutorial in slow blues.

I'm not as impressed with the organ solo in between, but I really admire their vision of the song, jazzing it up in the middle there I think adds to the back to blues feel of the second solo...it also makes the song even if it isn't my favorite part of it.

One other thing, talk about tutorial, the way the two guitars comp together is a whole lesson in what two guitars OUGHT to do instead of fighting each other, or just duplicating each other. They play so well together there....split up chords even to where one plays half, the other plays the other half of a "half chord"...let it breathe, no fighting for the pause or in-between phrases riffs...just elegant.
No argument from me!
 

fenderball

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,584
Duane's solo on that is one of my all time favorites...
to me, it is such touch and taste and tone...
 

DiazDude

Member
Messages
4,227
Looking at the liner notes from The Fillmore Concerts the only change to Stormy Monday was that they left out the harmonica solo on the original release. On this CD In Memory of Elizabeth Reed is spliced together from 2 different nights. The splice is right before Duane's solo.
BTW, as great as Duane's solo is on Stormy Monday, Dickey's is one of the perfect solos on record, IMO.
Yep you're right..the splice is on Elizabeth Reed..my mistake.
Going back to Tom Dowd..his production on this is the closest thing to flawless I've ever heard.
I have a 5.1 DVD audio mix of it and it's like you're on stage with them.
 

John Thigpen

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,764
Yep you're right..the splice is on Elizabeth Reed..my mistake.
Going back to Tom Dowd..his production on this is the closest thing to flawless I've ever heard.
I have a 5.1 DVD audio mix of it and it's like you're on stage with them.
I've got that DVD audio, and there's an interesting splice in You Don't Love Me....the body of the song is different from other releases, and then the long guitar solo section seems to be the same as the other releases. Have you noticed that too?

John
 

DiazDude

Member
Messages
4,227
I've got that DVD audio, and there's an interesting splice in You Don't Love Me....the body of the song is different from other releases, and then the long guitar solo section seems to be the same as the other releases. Have you noticed that too?

John
I just put it on...you're right, diff again & damn fine too.!!
 




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