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alternative to building your own sound absorption

swen

Member
Messages
192
hello earthlings...
i know building your own sound absorption is (one of) the best way to treat a room, however i was just wondering if there is anything out there that is an alternative to building your own (i am not even a handy-person's a**hole)

any decent sound panels worth looking at??

cheers,
swen
 

Mortician

Member
Messages
10
hello earthlings...
i know building your own sound absorption is (one of) the best way to treat a room, however i was just wondering if there is anything out there that is an alternative to building your own (i am not even a handy-person's a**hole)

any decent sound panels worth looking at??

cheers,
swen
I have had good luck with Ready Traps. There is some assembly but overal really quite easy.
 

Rex Anderson

Member
Messages
5,076
Pretty good prices here: http://www.atsacoustics.com/item--ATS-Acoustic-Panel-24-x-48-x-4--1026.html

This is a good company: http://www.gikacoustics.com/

This is where I had mine made: http://www.spi-co.com/absorption-plus-acoustical-panels/


Using a wood frame makes it easier to fabric wrap and have nice square edges. You can then use the wood frame to attach your frame hanger/D hooks and just hang them on the wall with picture hangers.

You can use Masonite for the backing.

Also, 2" is not great. 4" is much better. Best and most linear is 6" (but few rooms can handle losing a foot -6" panels on both sides of the room). Use a 1" x 4" for the 4" thick panel frame.

We paid an acoustician a lot of money to show us how to treat our rooms and make better panels.

If you use 2" of 701 on top of 2" of 703, you get two different densities and thus more linear absorption. 701 goes on the room side, 703 on the wall side. Don't put any glue on the 701 or 703.

701 is softer and fluffier and has a different frequency vs absorption curve than 703. For 6" panels (if your room can handle it), the bottom (or wall side layer) should be 2" of 705, a third density of material.

I have installed a lot of these panels in a lot of different rooms (control rooms, recording studios, mastering rooms, home theaters etc) and they work great and are much better than just 2" 703 or even 4" of just 703.
 
Last edited:

swen

Member
Messages
192
thanks for the suggestions guys!!!

will def check out the links!!

cheers
 

FFTT

Member
Messages
28,356
Owens Corning 703 panels are still the most efficient and cost effective.

A local wood shop could build you an assortment of simple box frames.
Lay in the 703 panels. Cover with something cheap like gauze or burlap with a staple gun or hot clue or both.
 

9fingers

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,770
Pretty good prices here: http://www.atsacoustics.com/item--ATS-Acoustic-Panel-24-x-48-x-4--1026.html

This is a good company: http://www.gikacoustics.com/

This is where I had mine made: http://www.spi-co.com/absorption-plus-acoustical-panels/


Using a wood frame makes it easier to fabric wrap and have nice square edges. You can then use the wood frame to attach your frame hanger/D hooks and just hang them on the wall with picture hangers.

You can use Masonite for the backing.

Also, 2" is not great. 4" is much better. Best and most linear is 6" (but few rooms can handle losing a foot -6" panels on both sides of the room). Use a 1" x 4" for the 4" thick panel frame.

We paid an acoustician a lot of money to show us how to treat our rooms and make better panels.

If you use 2" of 701 on top of 2" of 703, you get two different densities and thus more linear absorption. 701 goes on the room side, 703 on the wall side. Don't put any glue on the 701 or 703.

701 is softer and fluffier and has a different frequency vs absorption curve than 703. For 6" panels (if your room can handle it), the bottom (or wall side layer) should be 2" of 705, a third density of material.

I have installed a lot of these panels in a lot of different rooms (control rooms, recording studios, mastering rooms, home theaters etc) and they work great and are much better than just 2" 703 or even 4" of just 703.
Rex, this might be asking too much. How many panels (24" x 48" x 4") could a fairly serious amateur on a budget get away with using and what would be an approximate placement for mixing purposes. (near field monitors)
Thanks!
 

griggsterr

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,906
What is your purpose in treating the room? Everybody is being kind enough to tell you their favorite place to buy them.
depending on what issues you are having, determines the treatment.
 

Rex Anderson

Member
Messages
5,076
Rex, this might be asking too much. How many panels (24" x 48" x 4") could a fairly serious amateur on a budget get away with using and what would be an approximate placement for mixing purposes. (near field monitors)
Thanks!
There is no magic number. Look up LEDE (live end, dead end) and RFZ (Reflection Free Zone). The idea is to treat the front wall (behind the monitors), the side walls and ceiling to eliminate first reflection points and use diffusion on the rear wall to help scatter sound and minimize standing waves in the room.

The number of panels it takes to do it right depends on your room size. You also have to kill corners to deal with bass build up. A well treated room is not inexpensive or easy to do even if you do it all yourself and build all your panels. Plus, it takes time to hang all that stuff. In a small room, I would imagine three 2' x 4' absorber panels on the front wall, 2 on each side wall and one on the ceiling, so that's 8 panels total. Then you have 2 front corners that need bass traps and the rear wall needs diffusors.
 
Last edited:

Probos

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,200
I used GIK Acoustics. Great company, great products. They helped me treat my room and it worked wonders. They get my vote.
 

sleshnyc

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,336
Pretty good prices here: http://www.atsacoustics.com/item--ATS-Acoustic-Panel-24-x-48-x-4--1026.html

This is a good company: http://www.gikacoustics.com/

This is where I had mine made: http://www.spi-co.com/absorption-plus-acoustical-panels/


Using a wood frame makes it easier to fabric wrap and have nice square edges. You can then use the wood frame to attach your frame hanger/D hooks and just hang them on the wall with picture hangers.

You can use Masonite for the backing.

Also, 2" is not great. 4" is much better. Best and most linear is 6" (but few rooms can handle losing a foot -6" panels on both sides of the room). Use a 1" x 4" for the 4" thick panel frame.

We paid an acoustician a lot of money to show us how to treat our rooms and make better panels.

If you use 2" of 701 on top of 2" of 703, you get two different densities and thus more linear absorption. 701 goes on the room side, 703 on the wall side. Don't put any glue on the 701 or 703.

701 is softer and fluffier and has a different frequency vs absorption curve than 703. For 6" panels (if your room can handle it), the bottom (or wall side layer) should be 2" of 705, a third density of material.

I have installed a lot of these panels in a lot of different rooms (control rooms, recording studios, mastering rooms, home theaters etc) and they work great and are much better than just 2" 703 or even 4" of just 703.

Using 2 inch and hanging it 2 inches from the wall is as effective as using 4 inch and costs less. Just buy the 2x4 foot dense batts and build a simple wood frame. buy some fabric and staple it on. If you can cut your steak you can build these.
 

Silent Sound

Member
Messages
5,232
I had the guy at Lowe's cut mine for me. I just bought some 2x6's and had them cut them to length. Then I bought some screws and corner reinforcements and put it together in my garage using nothing but a drill. Then I covered them in the cheapest fabric Hobby Lobby had and stapled it on.

If you make them as gobos like I did, you can stretch your dollar further. Now I can place them in my mixing room when I mix, and place them in my tracking room when I track.

And how many you need is easy to answer. More. You always need more. But in reality, the question should be "what do you want to do with them?" If you're wanting to treat the entire room, it's gonna require a lot. If you're wanting to treat a tiny spot for you to sit and mix from, then you don't need near as many. I tend to pull them in close to me when I mix and set them right next to mics when I record so they're more effective. Setting a single small gobo right next to a mic can be just as effective as treating an entire wall, as far as that one mic is concerned anyway. It's a line of sight thing.
 

swen

Member
Messages
192
thank you everyone for the replies...

i think i may have a crack at making my own. i will post pics when i get around to it!!
 

swen

Member
Messages
192
What is your purpose in treating the room? Everybody is being kind enough to tell you their favorite place to buy them.
depending on what issues you are having, determines the treatment.
main purpose is for mixing and trying to get a true representation of recordings. Small room (4 x4.5 metres [13x15])
 

FFTT

Member
Messages
28,356
If building and mounting panels is not practical where you are located, you can also use commercially available elevator blanket hooks and clips to hang moving blankets from walls or from a boom stand in T shape.
 

griggsterr

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,906
main purpose is for mixing and trying to get a true representation of recordings. Small room (4 x4.5 metres [13x15])
the reason I ask is, I worked for a company that makes acoustic treatment products, and more than 50% of the time that people were buying acoustic treatment products is because they wanted to keep the sound from going into the other parts of the house, or outside. and foam or panels will not accomplish this.
 

FFTT

Member
Messages
28,356
Sound absorption should not be confused with sound proofing or volume reduction.
 

swen

Member
Messages
192
the reason I ask is, I worked for a company that makes acoustic treatment products, and more than 50% of the time that people were buying acoustic treatment products is because they wanted to keep the sound from going into the other parts of the house, or outside. and foam or panels will not accomplish this.
Sound absorption should not be confused with sound proofing or volume reduction.

yeah i'm not looking to soundproof... more to treat the reflections etc

when i record i either di instruments or wait until no one is in the house, tv is off etc
 




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