Am I sanding the body right?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Horacelokhang, Mar 18, 2016.

  1. Horacelokhang

    Horacelokhang Member

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    Hello guys,
    I have a squier affinity strat in metallic red.
    As I am experimenting to relic a poly finish (Yes I know you probably think I'm stupid to relic a poly body),
    I want to start by dulling the shiny metallic finish to make it look used and older.
    I started off under the trem cover so if i mess up it wouldn't be noticeable.
    As I sanded it, I was more like leaving white scratches rather than dulling the finish.
    Am I doing it right?
    If not, what are the better ways to dull the shiny finish?

    [​IMG]
     
    Fretmaster likes this.
  2. Structo

    Structo Member

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    It probably has a thick clear coat which is what you are sanding.

    I have only relic'd a Strat that I painted with nitro lacquer.
    On that one, I used some fine steel wool and a green Scotch pad.
     
  3. paintguy

    paintguy Long Hair Hippy Freak Silver Supporting Member

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    Yep the white look is the clear coat. Like Structo said, if you want just to dull it try some 0000 steel wool, scotch brite pad or a fine sandpaper ala 1200-2000.
     
  4. specialidiot

    specialidiot most likely to seceede Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Structo has the proper approach. Probably the white you are seeing is the dust you create with sanding filling the sanding marks
     
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  5. Horacelokhang

    Horacelokhang Member

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    Thanks for the advise.
    Since I'm gonna progress to make dings and dents after dulling it, I wanna ask if Its necessary to get rid of the clear coat?
     
  6. paintguy

    paintguy Long Hair Hippy Freak Silver Supporting Member

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    For dings and dents, no.

    If you want the worn spots where the color is worn through, you would need to sand through the clear, some color and maybe even the primer.(undercoat)
     
  7. Structo

    Structo Member

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    The problem with aging a poly finish is, it is usually very thick, so dings and dents will not look that great
    with that finish.
     
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  8. Horacelokhang

    Horacelokhang Member

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    Let's say I'm gonna make a arm wear that worn through, is it possible that I could sand and smoothen the boundary of the arm wear so that it won't be like missing a thick piece of coat like a poly dent?
     
  9. Guitarworks

    Guitarworks Member

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    Maybe just play it a lot and don't pamper it. That's how the guitars that inspired the relic craze got their look. The day-to-day handling is guaranteed to give you all kinds of nicks & scuffs, and repetitive motion against the body will cause wear in the usual areas. Natural non-faked wear is a lot more fun, a lot less work, and costs nothing but time. Besides - it's easy. There are guys that (understandably) blow a gasket when they accidentally cause a chip of finish to lift and flake off their strat body with minimal effort. And TGP tells them: "Don't get bent out of shape over it. Just peel that flake off - it's honest, natural wear! It's reliced now! Let that chip or gouge tell a story."
     
  10. poolshark

    poolshark Supporting Member

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    For getting an aged gloss on a poly finish, wet sand up to 1200-1500 grit, then focus on polishing compound. Coarser compounds (like red rubbing compound) will leave fine scratches that you'd get over time, while finer compounds will get you closer and closer to a mirror finish. You can simulate arm wear by sanding and polishing, but there's really no way to get around unrealistic looking dings and chips.
     
  11. great-case.com

    great-case.com a.k.a. "Mitch"

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    Excellent thread. Here's some some speculation packaged as advice ;). My pair of pennies might only be worth $0.01 but here they are.

    The reflectivity I see here is what a simpleton would classify as a SemiGloss, but labels don't matter here. Your working in Relativistic Space in so much as you wish to deGloss this current finish to a lower sheen.

    If it is a Polyurethane top coat
    : Ponder this. Sand it backwards... rather than moving up the grits, start at a polishing level and come down until you see the scratches at the depth you want. Once the scratches are there, go back up the grit scale but DO NOT REMOVE the scratches. Take a short cut on the polishing passes, you don;t want to cut deep. When the sheen starts to rise up to your preference, stop polishing.

    Dings into Poly are tough to control - good luck! I'll look forward to seeing this project evolve. Please keep us posted!

    ANYONE EVER TRIED - Wet 0000 steel wool? I recommend it but watch out for the moisture levels. Excellent swirl patterns, like the ones I see all over my oldest guitars.

    @paintguy Is that you, Larry? Cheers, mate! Scotch Bright Pads are a good idea but they do not have a predictable 'grit' in my opinion. Often, I find serious gouges occur. Maybe I am buying the wrong version? Anyway... we all shine on!
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2016
  12. jdogric12

    jdogric12 Supporting Member

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    Won't that just have disgusting Fullerplast underneath?
     
  13. sshan25

    sshan25 Supporting Member

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    I would suggest a fusion triggered nuclear explosion but Fender poly finishes, like cockroaches, are resistant to those.
     
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  14. T Dizz

    T Dizz Member

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    +1 use some 0000 or 000 steel wool for the result you want.
     
  15. icr

    icr Member

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    Why would you want to make your guitar look like someone ruined the finish with sandpaper. Is that the new thing people are trying to imitate?
     
  16. paintguy

    paintguy Long Hair Hippy Freak Silver Supporting Member

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    Absolutely. By sanding you are automatically making a smooth transition between the sanded and un-sanded area.

    It's me Mitch. :) You must be buying some industrial scotch brite pads if they are gouging the finish.(lol) Seriously the red, gray, green or white should be fine depending on how much one wants to sand off and dull a finish.
     

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