Amplifier Rental

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by Gavin, Jul 11, 2008.

  1. Gavin

    Gavin Supporting Member

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    I saw a buddie of mine at the county fair tonight. He was one of the judges for the battle of the bands (winner wins the spot on Sat. night to open for the headlining band). Anyways, he owns a local recording studio and asked me if I'd be willing to rent some of my amplifiers (various 70's Marshalls/Orange) to the studio. Not on a long term basis but for him to be able to advertise that these particular amps are available for rent. So my question is, what should I charge him to use one of my amps for rental? Would I be better off renting the amps to the studio on a monthly basis or a daily basis as bands/musicians request them?
     
  2. SatelliteAmps

    SatelliteAmps Member

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    Daily basis is usually better for you, but you should also allow a discount for a weekly or monthly rental. Figure out what you think is fair for the use of your amps. $50-$100 per day is fair for decent, well maintained stuff (here in Southern California anyways). Rarer pieces usually command more money. Also, expect your amps to get heavy usage in a studio and expect to have to re-tube more often.
     
  3. Gavin

    Gavin Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the reply. I did some recearch on the net and you're correct with the pricing ($50-$100) first day and half that for each consecutive day. Now I have to come up with a weekly/monthly rate.
     
  4. alivegy

    alivegy Member

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    The studio may take care of your stuff because the owner is your friend, but the bands using it might not since people don't seem to take care of what they don't own. Think rental cars. So definitely take into consideration the cost of some wear and tear as well as new tubes.
     
  5. Luke

    Luke Senior Member

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    You want a notarized letter of indemnity in the event your amp causes a fire. And another stating his insurance will cover theft or damages.
     
  6. Gavin

    Gavin Supporting Member

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    Good input...this is the stuff I didn't think about and need to hear/know.
     
  7. SatelliteAmps

    SatelliteAmps Member

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    Another issue to consider with any of this is how much you value the friendship. We all hope that there will never be an issue, but when doing business with a friend, sometimes things can get a bit sticky. Put everything in writing so everyone understands how things are going to work and who is responsible for what. It is much easier when everyone understands both positions (not just yours, but his also).

    Also, I would try to make it so the only person renting from you was your friend's studio. That way, any problems are between you and him, and you don't have to chase down someone who rented your amp and is out on tour (he would). And you won't have to deal with trying to get paid from a label, etc (he would).
     

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