An old guy giving a young guy advise about "GAS"...

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by standard24, Jan 2, 2018.


  1. jorgemncardoso

    jorgemncardoso Member

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    You're welcome mate :beer
     
  2. vourot

    vourot Member

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    I have four electrics , I am on the search for a fifth. For the first time I am considering a duplicate in a different colour. I am really struggling with this. I am very careful with what I buy. I do find that when I play the guitar that sits the most it is like getting a new guitar again and I am happy. One of them is a 61 re-issue SG that I got for a song a few years ago. I waited years to get it and I will never sell it , warts and all. Patience is your friend ( and buying used ).
     
  3. drri

    drri Member

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    Just amazes me how different they've all felt. It's the only thing that's held me from ordering online... But there is a Warren Haynes sig model on CME I think that's peaked my interest... Good price to
     
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  4. peskypesky

    peskypesky Member

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    excellent post.
     
  5. Kevy_Metal

    Kevy_Metal Member

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    I've been pretty happy with the guitars I own and the most work that's been done is a volume pot replaced in my 20-year-old strat, along with setup and a fret dressing. The most I'll have to have done soon is a new neck on my telecaster, so really, those two guitars have been it for me and probably will for as many years as they continue to inspire me.

    Now pedals, that's a whole different story. I enjoy trying out new pedals and adding/subtracting from what I own and hopefully catch myself from falling down a rabbit hole of wants insteads of needs. The way I look at pedal GAS, for myself at least, is sometimes it can become like trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist and all it takes to avoid buying stuff I just don't need is to play what I already have.
     
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  6. eriwebnerr

    eriwebnerr Member

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    Quoted for truth! I like the quote "Limitations always make for happiness" - Arthur Schopenhauer

    This is actually a good example IMO - I bet this kid will get one and then treasure it for many years. That's the opposite of the problem with the whole GAS thing - the thrill is in the impulsive justified acquisition NOT the ownership.
     
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  7. Yr Blues

    Yr Blues Member

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    There are some cheap, budget gems out there.

    My advice is to work on your technique and have fun. Be generous with your time if not money and splurge on great gear once in a while.

    Balanced life.
     
  8. mikefair

    mikefair Member

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    Nobody wants advise about anything. Nobody. About anything. If you're an old guy you should have figured that out already. The quickest way to turn someone off is to start a sentence with "you should" or "you shouldn't". If somebody was urging me to buy a PRS or a Suhr, they would get the stop sign. Played a bunch. never liked any of them. But then, I prefer wool to silk. People are funny like that.
     
  9. ripple

    ripple To keep fresh, keep capped & cold. Silver Supporting Member

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    Totally agree peskypesky - this is my method as well.

    I have a few real nice guitars, and mostly gig my Am Standard Teles and Strats, but the more budget friendly Epiphone semihollowbodies (Dot and 339), and the MIM Jazzmaster and MIM Strat are some of the funnest guitars I have to play and record with. Some minor tweaking, a better setup, and swapping in better electronics has yielded some wonderful results for very little $$$.

    I still can't believe the Epi 339 Pro I bought a couple years back was only $450 new with hardshell case. I picked up a set of chrome Grovers for it, but have left the stock tuners as it stays in tune wonderfully.

    Last year a drummer friend asked me to recommend a Christmas guitar for his son, and I couldn't say "Epiphone 339 Pro" fast enough. He called me later to tell me how much his son loved it, and thank me for the recommendation.

    Hell, I'm eyeballing one of those cheaper Gretsch 5622s as we speak, and almost impulse-bought an Epiphone double neck 1275 last year when I was surfing Sweetwater with a buzz on.
     
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  10. saltydogg

    saltydogg Rock & Roll Enthusiast Gold Supporting Member

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    GAS is GAS. You can't stop it, you can only hope to contain it.
     
  11. jads57

    jads57 Supporting Member

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    Aside from the intial Rush you get from getting a new toy, does it allow you to express your musicality any better? You still feel the need for more crayon colors? Is it too valuable to gig with? Or even just transport on public transportation? How many musical situations or gigs do you use it in? Is it a tool or simply a treasure? Can you gig w/out it? Do you have multiples?
    So I think these are ?'s that we all need to ask ourselves. And I'm guilty of having to much gear for sure. And this coming from a 60 year old pro guitarist his entire life.

    I think since Iphones,Internet/Facebook and Easy Credit have become the new normal. There seems to be a great need to out do one another on a larger scale than in the past. In the past it was strictly local unless you were fairly big time, or just plain wealthy. Rich kids with their treasures wether it was a vintage guitar (1950's Strat,LP), or cool new amp (Soldano,etc.) were always hanging out at hippest establishments/bars, showing off these aquisitions. This was their calling card, for the pretty girls theirs was built in already.

    I'm sure this holds true still, but now everyone even snap chats their dinner for likes on Facebook. Lots of Peer Preasure or Keeping up w/ the Jones if you like better. Also gear is the newer hobby for middle agers as opposed to golfing or buying the latest fishing gear and tackle. That was huge in my dad's time 1950'&60's
     
  12. soundchaser59

    soundchaser59 Supporting Member

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    My rule is 1 year before I start seriously thinking I should let it go. But gear should definitely have a "use by" date.
     
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  13. BADHAK

    BADHAK Member

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    Wisdom
     
  14. aaron1433

    aaron1433 Supporting Member

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    GAS is an evil mistress. Not that I adhere to this mantra for long, but less is more.

    And to echo the OP, quality over quantity for sure.
     
  15. misterturtlehead

    misterturtlehead Member

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    I am a working musician and a music geek supreme. I spend too much time and am too actively involved with music to think of it as a hobby. Though there are some aspects of music that I might think of as hobbies such as record collecting, listening to music, and reading about music, musicians, and musical instruments. However, learning tunes for gigs and playing gigs is work. And I think of my musical equipment as tools more than toys.

    Like I typed in a previous post in this thread, I have two old classical guitars that I bought at estate sales. One was $50 and the other was 60. Those are the guitars I practice on. And being the guitars I practice on they are the guitars I play the most often. The more I practice the more I can "express my musicality".

    Some of my guitars are rather expensive. But I gig with them. On New Year's Eve I played my 1957 Gibson Les Paul TV Junior. I have also played gigs on a 1956 Gibson ES-175D, a 1960 ES-330TD, a 1974 Les Paul Deluxe, and a 1999 Les Paul R6. I usually drive myself to gigs. When I take public transportation I travel light and take a guitar in a gig bag. I have other guitars for that. My guitars are both treasures and tools. I don't have multiples of the same exact guitar. But I have three different Les Pauls, a few different hollowbodies, and three bolt neck Les Paul copies. All of my electric guitars have been gigged with. I have a few acoustics that I play at home and occasionally take to a party or to somebody else's house to do some picking and grinning.

    I am not interested in keeping up with the Joneses. I don't find the Joneses very interesting. I do, however, have access to the Johnson files. I think all of my guitars look cool. I don't care if I look cool playing them. I am probably not cool. I would rather impress other folks, other musicians, with my musical skills, knowledge, and ability to play well with other musicians. I don't hang out in bars except when I am playing music in them. The bars that regular folks think are hip are not the kinds of places I like to be in. I would rather go somewhere where somebody like Marc Ribot might play.

    It wasn't until I was in my forties that I could afford to have more than a couple guitars at a time.
     
  16. Stinky Kitty

    Stinky Kitty Supporting Member

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    A few thoughts. My very first guitar was a 1981 BC Rich Eagle Koa standard bought over the phone from, if memory serves me, Manny's on 48th St.
    Blame Mr. Geraldo. :aok

    Anyways, I was a 20-yr-old Navy sailor attending training in Indianapolis and I had saved up for that guitar as a gift for myself for surviving my first enlistment (raised my right hand at 17 years of age). I had wanted to play guitar for awhile but was too involved in sports as a teen to really take it seriously so it wasn't until that 'Rich that I really went for it. Having written that, because that guitar was my first, I did not appreciate it as much as I should have. In fact, it wasn't long before I traded it for a Kramer Voyager :eek:because well...it was the era and I was an idiot.

    I think had I spent 2-3 years playing an ok guitar, I'd have landed on that 'Rich and understood what it all meant. So, I think there is plenty of time for young players to chase the big names and while it would be awesome to be a young player owning a PRS Standard or Tom Anderson, I think to a large degree, the Schecter players of today are the Suhr players of tomorrow and that's ok because the truth is, today, even the $500 guitars aren't half bad.

    If I had a son and I was wealthy, I don't think I would buy him anything over $1K. I'd want him to get those chops down so when he finally did pick up something special, unlike me all those years ago, he would appreciate just how good it is.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2018
  17. jads57

    jads57 Supporting Member

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    To the above post justifying his aquisitions. Good for you being able to make some $ part time and bringing your treasures to the gigs,etc.
    For me when I was 17 I used to bring my only guitar a 1958 Les paul Gold Top w/ Paf's to similar things. But in fairness they were just becoming Vintage and somewhat valuable in 1975.

    I guess the point I was making is even after 40 years of playing pro from all situations recording,concerts,clubs, churches, etc. I've truly only ever needed a few electrics, 2 acoustics. and a handful of pedals at most. The rest is strictly for my own pleasure, and hobby. The good thng as a pro player, Ive always have been able claim them as them as tax deductions.
     
  18. misterturtlehead

    misterturtlehead Member

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    I assume the post that I am replying to is your reply to my reply to your previous post. Stinky Kitty didn't type anything about being a working musician.

    I don't justify. I buy guitars as I find some I like and can afford them. One thing all of my guitars have in common is that I didn't have to spend any time wondering whether I should buy them or not. When somebody else asks me why I bought a particular guitar I say "Because I like it".

    I don't do music part time. I won't divulge how I got some of my money. But most and often all the money I make comes from music. I also claim music items as well as my office on my taxes.
     
  19. LarryWallwart

    LarryWallwart Member

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    almost every time I buy an identical guitar from what I already like, but just a different color, I am disappointed.
     
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  20. jads57

    jads57 Supporting Member

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    Misterturtlheadblues: You can buy whatever you like, or as much as you like. My comments were in advice to younger guys who suffer GAS, from an older guy who has and still has somewhat of that addiction through out the past 40 years. I just use my experiences to pass on to others. And again being a pro guitar player for so long as well as suffering GAS. Has taught me some expensive lessons in what one doesn't truly need to gig or be happy.

    What you choose to play is strictly up to you and your budget. But owning 1950's Les Pauls, Strats, Teles, as well as 2 Dumble Overdrive Specials and a boatload of older,newer gear has taught me a lot. It ain't the gear, it's inspiration form other players and the music first and foremost. Then the gear that matters. I just laugh at how especially in studio situations ,when guys go on and on about a peice of so called magical gear. What absolute nonsense! A Mexican Strat will pretty much do the same as a very high end one in that situation. It becomes a bit too much about showing off instead of the music itself.
    If a Boutique Strat makes you happier and you can afford it, absolutely go for it. But as far as the track and music itself. A regular Strat worked for many great players w/out too many problems. Play on Brother!
     
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