• The Gear Page Apparel & Merch Shop is Open!

    Based on member demand, The Gear Page is pleased to announce that our Apparel Merch Shop is now open. The shop’s link is in the blue Navigation bar (on the right side), “Shop,” with t-shirts, hats, neck buffs, and stickers to start. Here’s the direct link: www.thegearpageshop.com

    You’ll find exclusive high-quality apparel and merchandise; all items are ethical, sustainably produced, and we will be continuously sourcing and adding new choices. 

    We can ship internationally. All shipping is at cost.


An unpardonable sin (CL link)

guitarist58

Member
Messages
6,005
That really is terrible! An earlier Princeton Reverb is one amp I've always hoped to get some day--that one "used to be"... :(
 

62Tele

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,686
That's exactly the way Boogie started. A friend of mine has an early one - I think it was called a Prune Boogie or some such thing. It seems awful to folks looking for a stock vintage piece, but back in the day, when these amps were plentiful, everybody was trying to find something else (sound familiar?) and boutique companies didn't really exist, or were at least just getting started. Stuff like this used to surface all the time. Leo tinkered too.

This is what cracks me up - when everybody had the vintage stuff, all they wanted was something else. Now that everybody has everything at their fingertips, they want "the" tone. Sure drives the market though.
 

EdMan57

Member
Messages
2,030
Yeah,it looks like a mod that was done quite some time ago.Like jgm stated,back then an amp like a Deluxe or Princeton was often seen as nothing more than a good utility amp.Heck,I remember myself,back in the early '80s,wanting to get ahold of an old Fender tube amp,just to modify for more gain.Boy,how the times have changed.

Ed
 
Messages
3,766
Boogie and Dumble alike...

...yeah ruining old stuff sucks, but lets be real honest here. Sucks for those who long for an amp like that, but for history's record, I bet for every hacked up one that really gave a prospecting amp maker/designer a thrill you can find 6-10 mint untouched samples sitting UNUSED in a closet.

World's a funny thing.
 

GAT

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
18,941
That's exactly the way Boogie started. A friend of mine has an early one - I think it was called a Prune Boogie or some such thing. It seems awful to folks looking for a stock vintage piece, but back in the day, when these amps were plentiful, everybody was trying to find something else (sound familiar?) and boutique companies didn't really exist, or were at least just getting started. Stuff like this used to surface all the time. Leo tinkered too.

This is what cracks me up - when everybody had the vintage stuff, all they wanted was something else. Now that everybody has everything at their fingertips, they want "the" tone. Sure drives the market though.
I played an early Princeton modded Boogie, that's how Randall got started.
 

getbent

Member
Messages
4,305
that was pretty common and desirable back in the 70's. Lots of studio guys had those....

it wasn't old stuff back then.

I think the cl poster must have meant Randall Smith though....
 
Last edited:

rhythmrocker

1966 Battle of the Bands
Messages
2,888
Not unpardonable at all. - if you remember the context as someone here suggested. I have one (Deluxe), modded to Mk II; by the man himself (MB), modded by Cesar too. Paid 400.00 for the amp in 1987 - when they were plentiful.

I couldn't afford a Studio 22 or Mark or .50 Caliber, so I modded my FDR.

I remember the day I first heard the Princeton modded Boogie amp, belonging to Terry Haggarty of the Sons of Champlin. It was in a small shed at night and when I plugged into it, I was taken into another world - truly, I was blown away. The most raw, beautiful, open-sounding amp ever - and I still have the FDR MB did for me after that experience.

No - not unpardonable at all. It was done alot. I even had Sam Hutton (original Fender cab builder Sam Hutton) make a cab and head for me (which I no longer have, damn!). Remember the historical context. It's good to do so for all things. ~RR
 

zombiwoof

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,906
Boogie had to stop doing those mods because Fender cut them off from buying the transformers, which they were buying in large quantities from Fender. Fender found out where all the transformers were going and put an end to it. That's when Boogie started making their own models.

Al
 




Trending Topics

Top