Analog Delays--Is Noise Typical?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by brewbaker, Mar 15, 2008.

  1. brewbaker

    brewbaker Supporting Member

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    Here's a problem I'm having with a newly acquired delay pedal that gets glowing reviews. I'm scratching my head because I can't be the only one who's noticed it. The builder says it's normal for analog circuits so it's apparently not defective. I'm not going to name names because I don't want to start bad-mouthing, rather just a scientific survey to clarify things.

    Noise--particularly hissy, sputtering sounds synced with the delayed signal. Like you can hear it working. Not real loud but noticeable enough to be really annoying, particularly for recording. It's more noticeable the longer the delay time since there's more space between notes to hear it.

    I'm really disappointed as I had high hopes for this pedal and am sick of trying things and sending them back.
     
  2. mistercoffee1

    mistercoffee1 Member

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    It can be, particularly with longer delay times.
    This is why I chose to go with an analog voiced digital delay.
     
  3. Lolaviola

    Lolaviola Supporting Member

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    Well, yes and no.
    Boss and Ibanez delays are a few I know of that use noise-reduction circuitry. It lends a "dark" quality to the delay sometimes, but I don't like noise so I prefer to live w/ darkness rather than noise.
     
  4. orogeny

    orogeny Supporting Member

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    never experienced that with a dm3
     
  5. Rid

    Rid Senior Member

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    I like the noise, the grungy nature of analouge and alikes...
    Have gotten tired of the modern sterile tones!
     
  6. Passenger84

    Passenger84 Member

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    I've found that analog delays enhance what's going on with your rig. So if your amp is a bit noisy, they'll accentuate it. Just my experience, as I tend to always own noisy amps! :)
     
  7. fatback

    fatback Member

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    Clock noise can be a challenge for builder's to deal with when designing analog delays. I've talked with Malekko about how it took him revising his delay boards a few times to get rid of the clock. I haven't tried one myself, but word on the street is that MXR's designers weren't nearly so diligent in dealing with the clock noise in their new Carbon Copy delay.
    :eek:


    Both the Malekko and Maxon analog delays I'm using are nice and quiet and don't have any clock issues.
    :AOK
     
  8. Windup 43

    Windup 43 Supporting Member

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    I've had the same experience but live w/ both types. My old Ibanez Delay Champ is definitely a darker sounding delay, but its dead quiet. My DMM on the other hand is brighter, but there's definitely some degree of white noise on the repeats, especially w/ longer delays- sounds so good though, that I really can't complain. Like someone else said though, one solution might be to go w/ an analog voiced delay instead which won't have the noise- there are plenty of good ones out there...
     
  9. Lolaviola

    Lolaviola Supporting Member

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    Ahhh,
    Beware of the "rebote" variety, I had one and there were some unusable knob-settings.
     
  10. Howard Davis

    Howard Davis Member

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    Yes, some white noise (like a hiss) is normal in all analog delay chips, especially at lower clock frequencies - which means at longer delay settings. Sputtering however is not normal, and may indicate an abnormally noisy delay chip or opamp in the unit that needs to be replaced. Various noise reduction circuitry techniques such as pre/de-emphasis, noise gating, and companding are used to minimize the audible noise, and a properly designed and built analog delay pedal should have a good enough signal to noise ratio for stage and studio use.

    Guitar pedal design engineering, repairs, and custom mods:
    http://howard.davis2.home.att.net/
    Designer of the Memory Man
     
  11. brian marshall

    brian marshall Member

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    every analog ive ever owned... maxon AD9, boss DM2, old school DOD's, every one... there was a low level hiss in the background when they were on. All of them used essentially the same noise reduction circuit.

    None of them really had clock noise issues though, unless you messed with the trimmers.

    Actually one of the DOD FX90s i had had some background sputtering on long delay times, but i think someone had ****ed with it before i got it.
     

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