Anderson Appreciation Thread

jmelm

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,853
Thanks to all those who are liking the post of my guitar :)

In case any of you are wondering, those are the Lollar DB humbuckers. I was curious about those pickups and just wanted to do something a bit different from my other TAs. It’s a Mahogany body and “custom” Mahogany neck (Tom doesn’t typically offer that as a standard option on Drop Tops). I wanted to get a little bit of Les Paul flavour in my longer scale length Drop Top. I haven’t played it with more than 2 amps yet or done a direct comparison to my other TAs, but so far I think it’s turned out great. Pickups seem fantastic.
 

darchirnoj

Member
Messages
1,238
I sold a mint R9 post TA Shorty purchase.
Even with a swamp ash body and roasted maple neck, to my ears, the shorter scale length really made all the difference in thickening up the sound. Had I really liked the R9 vs the Shorty or felt it could do something the Anderson couldn’t, I would’ve kept it. But I really couldn’t tell a distinct difference between the two with re: to thick tone in the bridge (TA has S-S neck and middle).

Of course, playability and fun factor was a no-brainer ...I can get lost playing the TA, and original stuff just pops out, it’s so much fun.

I struggled with the LP. Sometimes I felt like it was playing me vs the other way around.
 

s2y

Member
Messages
20,189
I sold a mint R9 post TA Shorty purchase.
Even with a swamp ash body and roasted maple neck, to my ears, the shorter scale length really made all the difference in thickening up the sound. Had I really liked the R9 vs the Shorty or felt it could do something the Anderson couldn’t, I would’ve kept it. But I really couldn’t tell a distinct difference between the two with re: to thick tone in the bridge (TA has S-S neck and middle).

Of course, playability and fun factor was a no-brainer ...I can get lost playing the TA, and original stuff just pops out, it’s so much fun.

I struggled with the LP. Sometimes I felt like it was playing me vs the other way around.

LOL, a short scale 2 humbucker mahogany guitar would be next. I have an ancient Kramer Nightswan II and love the vibe. The Les Paul ergonomics and frets don't work well with me. PRS has a model or two that are very close to what I need, but my hands strongly prefer a flatter radius.
 

jmelm

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,853
I had a Cobra S and it felt fantastic! It’s hard to imagine anyone not loving how comfy that guitar is. My issue with it was it was a 3 P90 guitar. And while it looked great, I don’t love the TA P90s — and to change 3 of them to another brand, while easy, just wasn’t cost effective so I sold they. But a Cobra is such an amazing guitar. I would love to get one but don’t feel the need between this new guitar and the Bobcat & Atom I have. But I also have never been able to get along with LPs.
 
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Megatron

Member
Messages
1,633
PRS has a model or two that are very close to what I need, but my hands strongly prefer a flatter radius.
Often wish PRS offered more radius options and more Ebony FBs. Would be happy with 12" or compound and an ebony FB.
 

Megatron

Member
Messages
1,633
Agreed 100%. 12" is my minimum to consider something since I generally use 10's with very low action.
If I could get a CU with an ebony Board, 12" or compound 12-16".........medium jumbo/jumbo fret wire. And a Hollowbody II to go with it just the same......


.....just take my money.
 

s2y

Member
Messages
20,189
If I could get a CU with an ebony Board, 12" or compound 12-16".........medium jumbo/jumbo fret wire. And a Hollowbody II to go with it just the same......


.....just take my money.

If that were an option on any model, I'd own a 594, DGT, Custom 24 Floyd, and perhaps a 509. ;)
 

s2y

Member
Messages
20,189
Possibly breaking protocol here, but if you're looking for a Cobra S, I know a guy.

(And that guy is anxiously awaiting his next TA, a Lil' Angel.)

I've never been much of a rules guy. I appreciate the offer. A 25.5" scale HSS with fairly oddball specs is my top priority. The Cobra S is a top notch guitar and probably next in line after an HSS Pro Am.
 

s2y

Member
Messages
20,189
Thanks to all those who are liking the post of my guitar :)

In case any of you are wondering, those are the Lollar DB humbuckers. I was curious about those pickups and just wanted to do something a bit different from my other TAs. It’s a Mahogany body and “custom” Mahogany neck (Tom doesn’t typically offer that as a standard option on Drop Tops). I wanted to get a little bit of Les Paul flavour in my longer scale length Drop Top. I haven’t played it with more than 2 amps yet or done a direct comparison to my other TAs, but so far I think it’s turned out great. Pickups seem fantastic.

Purely curiosity, does he allow different pickups? If not, I'm fine with a nice neck pickup and 22 frets on something like a Cobra S. My (ancient) Kramer Nightswan II has a hot rail and 24 frets. I'm generally a 22 fret guy with hum buckers if I have the option. The Hotrail sounds about like a 22 fret full size humbucker.
 

jmelm

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,853

AMAZING!!!

Those mini-hums are really cool. I have a 3-mini hum hollow Atom with a Bigsby and it’s just such a great guitar and unique sounding with those pickups — a great complement to the traditional H and S pickups.

And the Crowdster +2 is amazing. I also have one in kind of a different shade of purple (I’ll have to take some pics to post). Which brings me to what I think is one of the best kept secrets in Anderson world and among all guitars I’ve ever played. The sound of the Crowdster — with its Piezo, acoustic strings and acoustic bridge — plugged into a great clean channel electric amp is one of THE MOST unique and beautiful sounds I have ever heard. I remember when I first plugged that guitar into my AC30 and played only the Piezo and was blown away. And yes, the humbuckers with the acoustic strings and bridge into a clean channel like that sound amazing as well, and of course you can blend the two together in whatever proportion you want.

I’m sure you and other Crowdster owners have discovered that, but I’m also certain that many have not tried it and people who have thought about buying a Crowdster but never pulled the trigger assume that that guitar is only about plugging into an acoustic amp or front of house like most electric acoustics. But that guitar pluged into an electric amp with either or both of the Piezo or humbuckers produces such a beautiful, ethereal sound that you cannot easily duplicate unless you have a guitar with the same kind of bridge/strings/pickups. And if you’re just playing the humbuckers, you can get some really great clean electric tones which are surprisingly good. Aside from high gain which will feedback the guitar too much, it is an incredibly versatile guitar and I don’t think anyone who hasn’t played one really understands what it can do. It is easily one of my favourite guitars ever.
 

jmelm

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,853
Purely curiosity, does he allow different pickups? If not, I'm fine with a nice neck pickup and 22 frets on something like a Cobra S. My (ancient) Kramer Nightswan II has a hot rail and 24 frets. I'm generally a 22 fret guy with hum buckers if I have the option. The Hotrail sounds about like a 22 fret full size humbucker.

No, TA will not build a guitar for you with any pickups aside from their own. But their guitars sound great and there are no shortage of pickups they make you can use that will sound really good. I only did this because I really wanted a guitar with high output pickups that would be kind of a 80s/90s hard rock & metal guitar for me that would give me a different sound than the TAs that I have but still have the TA playability, as an alternative to a Jackson or ESP (which are the guitars I liked in those days before I discovered TA).

Sorry for that aside but the short answer is you can spec out a great TA guitar using their own pickups, and if you ever want to try other pickups down the road, it will still be the most comfortable and great performing guitar there is.

The only TA pickups I don’t care for at all are their P90 pickups. Other people’s tastes and rigs may be a good match for them. But for my taste, while I can say you can get any model TA with any of their own pickups and it will kick butt, the one exception for me would be the P90s and I would definitely go with aftermarket P90s if I ever get another TA P90 guitar. As I mentioned in the above post, if you want something different than a hum or single in any guitar, the TA mini humbuckers are awesome.
 

s2y

Member
Messages
20,189
No, TA will not build a guitar for you with any pickups aside from their own. But their guitars sound great and there are no shortage of pickups they make you can use that will sound really good. I only did this because I really wanted a guitar with high output pickups that would be kind of a 80s/90s hard rock & metal guitar for me that would give me a different sound than the TAs that I have but still have the TA playability, as an alternative to a Jackson or ESP (which are the guitars I liked in those days before I discovered TA).

Sorry for that aside but the short answer is you can spec out a great TA guitar using their own pickups, and if you ever want to try other pickups down the road, it will still be the most comfortable and great performing guitar there is.

The only TA pickups I don’t care for at all are their P90 pickups. Other people’s tastes and rigs may be a good match for them. But for my taste, while I can say you can get any model TA with any of their own pickups and it will kick butt, the one exception for me would be the P90s and I would definitely go with aftermarket P90s if I ever get another TA P90 guitar. As I mentioned in the above post, if you want something different than a hum or single in any guitar, the TA mini humbuckers are awesome.

Gotcha. Will probably go the 22 fret and full size humbucker route so I can get it wired nicely on the one down the road.
 

pipedwho

Member
Messages
1,681
AMAZING!!!

Those mini-hums are really cool. I have a 3-mini hum hollow Atom with a Bigsby and it’s just such a great guitar and unique sounding with those pickups — a great complement to the traditional H and S pickups.

And the Crowdster +2 is amazing. I also have one in kind of a different shade of purple (I’ll have to take some pics to post). Which brings me to what I think is one of the best kept secrets in Anderson world and among all guitars I’ve ever played. The sound of the Crowdster — with its Piezo, acoustic strings and acoustic bridge — plugged into a great clean channel electric amp is one of THE MOST unique and beautiful sounds I have ever heard. I remember when I first plugged that guitar into my AC30 and played only the Piezo and was blown away. And yes, the humbuckers with the acoustic strings and bridge into a clean channel like that sound amazing as well, and of course you can blend the two together in whatever proportion you want.

I’m sure you and other Crowdster owners have discovered that, but I’m also certain that many have not tried it and people who have thought about buying a Crowdster but never pulled the trigger assume that that guitar is only about plugging into an acoustic amp or front of house like most electric acoustics. But that guitar pluged into an electric amp with either or both of the Piezo or humbuckers produces such a beautiful, ethereal sound that you cannot easily duplicate unless you have a guitar with the same kind of bridge/strings/pickups. And if you’re just playing the humbuckers, you can get some really great clean electric tones which are surprisingly good. Aside from high gain which will feedback the guitar too much, it is an incredibly versatile guitar and I don’t think anyone who hasn’t played one really understands what it can do. It is easily one of my favourite guitars ever.
Absolutely! The M series in the Cobra S have their own unique super fat single coilish tone. I love that sound. And the Crowdster piezo pickup does work through electric guitar amps, but I tend to roll off some of the sizzle at the top to stop it being overemphasised. The Crowdster sounds its best through a nice Acoustic amp. I've also used it with acoustic IRs and it shines there too. The electric pickups are great, but the piezo is the real stand out in that guitar.
 

Killcrop

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,224
Classic Shorty, in Metallic Black Cherry. The finish looks spectacular in both sunlight and stage lighting.

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Love that color.
 

macrofor

Macro
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
455
Compulsive guitar flipper here - and I’ve handled some nice ones. I decided to give TAG a try and my expectations were shaped by a thread comparing Suhr, Tyler and Anderson. Some said they lacked soul, whatever that means. But I did a straight trade for a PRs DGT and I got a classic T with 3 pups and trem, in Mary Kaye white. It’s modest in appearance, but man I am really impressed, and have a hard time putting it down.

the neck and ergonomic feel is very good, super easy to play deep and hard or light and fast. But the pickups are really what’s grabbing me - they’re voiced in a wAy that’s kinda muscular with being too mid humped. They make my fender CS Teles sound enemic. I prefer a Gotoh trem, but this will work. The strat tones are pretty convincing and I can actually play clean on the bridge. Great guitars.
 




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