Any Linemen/Women here?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by MustardCap, May 3, 2019.

  1. MustardCap

    MustardCap Member

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  2. Jason Calieri

    Jason Calieri Silver Supporting Member

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    Singer in my band does it. Makes GREAT money, especially if there are storms and he gets sent out of state for a couple weeks. It sounds like the training was pretty intense, though.
     
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  3. CharlieS

    CharlieS Member

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    One of my sons is a lineman and the other two are in the apprentice program. Good money and benefits. All of them are college educated and went into it after pursuing their intended careers just out of college. The safety protocols are stressed throughout their training, and all have adapted to climbing poles or being up in the bucket.
     
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  4. jack anderson

    jack anderson Silver Supporting Member

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    I'm a retired lineman for a city electric power utility. Like it's been said, the training is excellent. I went thru a 6 step 3 year apprenticeship ; it's now a 7 step 4 year apprenticeship. The people I've worked with are excellent workers , and people.
    The only wild card is the electric company itself. Some companies don't stress safety and training enough. I was lucky to work for one that definitely did.
     
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  5. Skeet skeet!

    Skeet skeet! Member

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    Not BC Hydro, the carriers in the telecom industry (Telus/Rogers/Freedom mobile). Safety and process standards are definitely slower and more expensive in power.
     
  6. n9ne

    n9ne Member

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    I did a lot of climbing as a CATV service tech, but just on phone poles that were rarely more than 20-30 feet tall; no towers or anything major like that.

    When done properly, it’s actually surprisingly safe. The harnesses and safety equipment are extremely solid and highly dependable; I don’t recall ever hearing about an accident due to hardware failure.

    But pretty much everyone who climbs for any length of time has at least one story of falling or “burning a pole”....and in virtually every instance, the fall resulted from someone trying to rush, getting sloppy, or not following protocol. (It happened to me only once; I got sloppy and wasn’t paying attention to my foot angle...and in a blink, i was on the ground with a hundred slivers in my arms and chest).

    But like I said....the stuff I did was strictly minor league entry level. The guys who climb the big towers or hang from helicopters working on high voltage lines....those guys got the serious cajones.
     
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  7. MustardCap

    MustardCap Member

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    Thank you for your service. Bitched at when the power goes out and bitched at because power was not restored fast enough. I've seen the conditions they work in and I would not want any part of that. Tough Career and I appreciate the Industry commitments and the Lineman.
     
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  8. mdrake34

    mdrake34 Member

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    My wife’s cousin’s husband is a lineman. Does a lot of overtime, goes out of town/state for weeks at a time after disasters/big storms and makes a lot of money. Hard work for sure.

    One story I’ll never forget him telling, I don’t believe he witnessed it but just knew the guy, a lineman was in a bucket, some kind of gas explosion underneath occurred, it melted the bottom of the bucket which caused him to fall through and dangle from his harness while being cooked alive. He lived in the hospital, but not very long.
     
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  9. direwolf

    direwolf Supporting Member

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    When the temperature drops below zero working aloft becomes a lot more difficult. You gotta have that good wasp spray in the summer especially if you're allergic to stings.
     
  10. 70 Mach 1

    70 Mach 1 Supporting Member

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    Not me. I have enough trouble getting up 12 feet to get to the motion lights
     
  11. Eric Rowland

    Eric Rowland Member

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  12. voodoosound

    voodoosound Funk & Grooven member Silver Supporting Member

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    They do indeed. Perhaps they do it different in Canada but if you work in the US especially the western states with anything to do with electrical or telecom you are drug tested. Not just by the company but DOT at any time. Guys have been let go from drinking to much the night before and showing up to work with .005 blood alcohol after random testing. You've got to have your head on straight and be smarter than the average bear if you expect to retire alive or not be canned for stupidity, or drug alcohol abuse. This applies evenly across the board with ALL substances. Like in my fairy tail state where marijuana is "legal". With the smallest traces of it in your system you can still be fired being a line worker as it should be. The thing about this type of worker is you're relying on your partner or team as much as yourself. If you have one turd on your crew it jeopardizes everyone. They usually wash themselves out pretty quick.
     
  13. voodoosound

    voodoosound Funk & Grooven member Silver Supporting Member

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    Telecom I'm guessing. 18 feet.
     
  14. voodoosound

    voodoosound Funk & Grooven member Silver Supporting Member

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    Towers and copters are significantly safer than free hooking poles IME. It is my understanding that most utilities have gone back to the hitchhike method using a double belt/strap method. The whole 3 point of contact free climbing system that many companies used was always stupid. Belt climbing was always safer. Loggers have been doing it for almost 200 years now.
     
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  15. urizen

    urizen Gold Supporting Member

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    Somebody started a thread about Webb's song that pulled in some interesting comments and contributions from TGPista respondees.
     
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  16. LittleWagon

    LittleWagon Member

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    Sure am!
     
  17. LittleWagon

    LittleWagon Member

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    V true. It's quite an old fashioned trade, but the new generation are getting hip to a healthier lifestyle. Mental health awareness is starting to penetrate too, so that's a huge help.
     
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  18. Brett's Les Paul

    Brett's Les Paul Member

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    I climbed a lot when I was in the Navy. Aft mast of my destroyer was very tall. The climbing gear keeps you safe if you use it correctly. I was scared shitless on the way up. Going down for some reason wasn't as bad. I only had to do it once every couple weeks to work on gear aloft and do maintenance work. The guys that work in this field earn their money for sure.
     
  19. bluwoodsman

    bluwoodsman Member

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    Hometown school has long had a major training program. Built a large training center on the edge of town. What I have heard over the years:

    • tough program, your nephew isn't alone. IMO that's a good thing. It shouldn't be easy as dangerous as it is.
    • Great pay right away
    • Burnout and health issues are common, not a lifelong career for most so having another option is worth considering
    • My sense is that most lineman worry more about the guy or crew they are working with than themselves. Safety is a team effort and it's often someone other than the person who is injured who's at fault.
    • My personal belief--probably lots of demand and job security due to aging demographics--AND due to climate change, which has stronger wind and icing events occuring more often than ever before.
    I haven't gripped about how long it takes to get power restored, mucho respect for their work--if anything always amazed how fast they can get it restored.
     
  20. MustardCap

    MustardCap Member

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    Nephew is graduating in 2 1/2 weeks. He is performing awesome in his training. He interviewed yesterday for Quanta Services and Ericson. Both offering him really good Benes and a tad over $30/hr to start. He also obtained his CDL license through extra training and will continue more training in Heavy equipment operation. Very proud of him.. Looks like he may be heading to the Denver region as both companies have tons of work available around there. The extra credentials should open up a lot more opportunities for him.
     
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