Any love for Larry Carlton on Joni Mitchell's "Help Me"?

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by szechuan, Apr 29, 2012.

  1. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    I met Mike Post through a mutual friend many years ago. He said 'Next time you are in LA come to my office and I'll play you some Larry Carlton tapes where he's really playing'. Sadly, I never cashed in on the offer.
     
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  2. Lucidology

    Lucidology Member

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    Cool... Have not seen that one yet ...
     
  3. lon

    lon Member

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    I agree with this. In some of the instructional materials like the early StarLicks videos/CD he talked about how he would stack chord on chord as a way to navigate through a tune. Somehow, he mixes a perfect amount of linear playing with triad on triad and some tasteful blues bends.

    Listen to the solo on Donald Fagan's Nightfly album- "New Frontier" and check out how he moves through the solo: Starting on the 4 chord (A)
    Nice blues bends back to Tonic (E) - When he comes to the Amaj7 D9b5 C11 (Gm9/C) passage into a C11b5 partial triad (Bb Gb A) before resolving to E

    He's just really tasteful.
     
  4. Steve Hotra

    Steve Hotra Silver Supporting Member

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    I bought a red 335 because of Mr. Carlton. I'm not even close to his playing ability, but I've always loved the tone he got from his 335.
    I met him once, when his wife came to play at a church years ago. He is a really nice guy.
     
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  5. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    I have some guitar charts Larry wrote out for Steely Dan. He knew exactly what chords he was playing.
     
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  6. jens5

    jens5 Silver Supporting Member

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    One of my biggest influences.
     
  7. blueworm

    blueworm Member

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    I like LC playing on 'Help Me'. In fact I love the song.

    But I like Carlton's playing even more on Joni's subsequent album. The swelling/slithering notes on 'Don't interrupt The Sorrow' always get me (and there's Robben Ford playing the acoustic on that track)
     
  8. guitararmy

    guitararmy Member

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    Another huge LC fan here! I listen to a lot of smooth jazz, so besides his rock/pop playing I listen to his work with Fourplay as well as his more recent solo recordings.
    Can't beat some Larry Carlton mixed with some Lee Ritenour!
    BTW I didn't realize that his signature on the back of the headstock of the Valley Arts LC Custom model was a real signature...I recently donated mine to a fundraiser.
     
  9. Trebor Renkluaf

    Trebor Renkluaf I was hit by a parked car, what's your excuse? Silver Supporting Member

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    I like Neapolitan ice cream.
     
  10. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    Old thread, no one answered your question. The answer is yes, it's a Db. In the key of C the neopolitan ii chord is basically a Db major typically in first inversion. It is being substituted for a IV chord.

    So in C major you play a Db major instead of an F major. This voicing leads/resolves very nicely into the V chord (in this case G).

    Play this progression, it will probably sound familiar.

    1-x-x-1-2-x = F-Ab-Db
    3-x-5-4-3-x = G-G-B-D
    x-3-x-0-1-0 = C-G-C-E

    Or anything similar. Just be sure to play the F-Ab-Db, then a G chord, then a C chord. You can also end on a C minor chord.

    What is happening is the F note is going up to G while the Ab is resolving down to G while also resolving up to a B and the Db is resolving up to D while also going down to B.

    The classical guys originally came up with this kind of progression which is where the word neopolitan comes from.
     
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