Any love for the Rickenbaker 330??!

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by michael.e, Nov 7, 2005.


  1. michael.e

    michael.e Silver Supporting Member

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    So I am thinking about getting one. I saw Riffmeister's geet and just HAD to have one for my little TopHat. I have enough lead type wanker guits, I am thinking chime and riddim and some preety arpeggio's. M.E.
     
  2. AshlandBump

    AshlandBump Member

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    I've had one since April '03 - there's no guitar like it in terms of tone. Matched with a Vox or Vox-type clone, it's awesome - I use it for Radiohead/REM/The Jam stuff. Not a shred/lead machine but good for fill-type leads. The only issue I have with it is the finish on the fret board. Since I'm not going to sell it I'll probably take it off.
     
  3. Motorhed

    Motorhed Member

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    i've had mine for about 5 years now, its always in the circulation of my regularly played guitars. i'll never get rid of it, ricks are a great addition to any collection, nothing sounds like them or looks like them. even now after all these years, they're still highly unique. i flat out fell in love with the tone the first time i played one, the love of the looks came later.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. pfflam

    pfflam Silver Supporting Member

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    Not true about the jam shred . . . well . . . you wont get metal shred or wankfest-Malmsty shred, but, I was in a band with a guy who played one of those through a Mesa Boogie SOB and the tones were transcendant screaming jam shredalicious!!

    Not like some fusion blister-bore shred but noisy feedback shaping, play at full throttle with enormous subtle complex sound with an incredibly varied set of tones to boot . . .

    I can still feel the ambient vibrations that this guy used to get from that rig-set-up . . . and that was in the 80s!! . . . I mean the whole environment would be alive with quaking tones!!

    I so remember that beautifull sheltering shimmering cascade of noise that I just bought his Mesa Boogie SOB after all these years . . . .

    Someday, maybe, I'll be able to kick in for a Rick too . . .
     
  5. sanhozay

    sanhozay klon free since 2009 Silver Supporting Member

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    Not crazy about the modern pickups - not chimey enough and too harsh but the vintage repro toasters are very nice. Hate the narrow boards and thin necks but love the tones.
     
  6. AshlandBump

    AshlandBump Member

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    I was referring to The Jam, as in Paul Weller, not jamming in general. The guy in Fugazi plays one so a 330 can definitely rock.
     
  7. pfflam

    pfflam Silver Supporting Member

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    Oh . . . yeah . . I guess I wasn't specifically referring to that part of your post, but rather to the use of a Rick as lead/noise instrument in a jam based band.
     
  8. michael.e

    michael.e Silver Supporting Member

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    Wow, Nice!!! The guitar that I am looking at is like this, but with Black hardware. I plan on changing it out to chrome when I can afford it. It also has pickups that have 6 screws instead of what is in this pic. What pickups are in this pic, and how do they differ from the units with the 6 screws? Thanks, M.E.
     
  9. AshlandBump

    AshlandBump Member

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    M.E. - be aware that Ric is pretty funny about replacing hardware -- extra pieces are not easy to come by because, AFAIK, you can only get them from Ric and Ric limits what they will sell, they're especially wary of people building Ric knock-offs and protecting their mark.

    The pickups you're probably looking at are Ric Hi-Gains, not the "Toasters" as you see in the pic here. Hi gains have ceramic magnets and have more of a modern sound -- think REM, Jam, etc. The Toasters have alnico magnets and are supposedly more chimey -- think the Byrds, Hollies, Beatles, etc.

    I have hi gains on my 330 and like them just fine -- there's a lot of debate on this -- you have to know what kind of tone you're looking for. Don't be fooled by the name though, hi gains still have plenty of chime, they're definitely not hot, in my book.
     
  10. e-z

    e-z Member

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    I love my 330 and I have the modern pick ups on it and they sound plenty chimey.
     
  11. da-boogieman

    da-boogieman Member

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    Most of the issues already mentioned: Neck is too narrow at the nut for me. Board finish feels wierd. I have vintage toasters and they work for the sound. I also have vintage tuners and they suck. Rick setups are typically pretty bad and some can't be intonated without moving the bridge (ask me!). Check out the rickenbacker newsgroup, if it is still around, and you'll find out all you need. BTW, my present Ricky is a Carl Wilson LE 360/12, so take my comments in that context.
     
  12. JPERRYROCKS

    JPERRYROCKS Member

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    +1 for the vintage toasters.

    I don't like the high-gain pickups that Ric uses in some of their cheaper standard models. They don't have the sparkle and chime of the toasters.

    Ric will never change their vintage ways with their skinny necks and small width nut's. Many people end up selling their Ric's because of their lack of playability and comfort level.

    12 strings on a 1 5/8 inch nut? Talk about torture, baby!
     
  13. samdjr74

    samdjr74 Supporting Member

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    I've alway had a Ric and I just recently purchased a 330.
    I love it, it has the modern pick-ups which actually sound pretty good, but I do prefer the toaster pick-ups. The neck width takes a little getting used to but once it's fine.

    Thanks,
    Sam

    [​IMG][/IMG]
     
  14. johnmfer

    johnmfer Supporting Member

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    I temporarily traded a friend one of my guitars for his Ric 330 for a while earlier this year. I ended up writing some songs with my band while playing it at practice. Now that we've traded back, the songs just simply don't sound the same to me without that guitar. All my guitars are Fenders or similar, so this one was quite a bit different to play... not bad, just very different.
     

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