Any luthiers here that can help me w shaving a neck?

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by Drew816, Mar 2, 2019.

  1. larry1096

    larry1096 Member

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    As a general rule, if you look at the neck shapes a maker offers, you *should* be safe taking any neck from them down to the dimensions of their smallest offering. It's not likely they're changing the way they install truss rods based on neck carves; not saying it couldn't happen, but it's probably not common.

    If you go beyond (smaller) than the OEM's smallest standard carve, then you could be causing yourself problems. If you have a friend with access to an X-Ray (not as uncommon as you think, many receiving docks now have them for security purposes, as well as the more typical medical devices) you could always snap a picture and be absolutely certain.

    Larry
     
  2. Oinkus

    Oinkus Member

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    The finish is probably more than .04 thick. You can get that with sandpaper in 15 minutes or so ,not like it would take any amount of time ? I remove finish and tung oil necks but very few around here will agree on anything like what finish or hard vs soft finish protection. Pretty quick and easy project to sand and oil it yourself just let the oil dry for at least 24 hours before you resand and apply again. I go up to 800 or 1000 grit but I don't polish it to glossy finish.
     
  3. beorn

    beorn Member

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    A barber might be better than a luthier at shaving a neck.
     
  4. Jon Silberman

    Jon Silberman 10Q Jerry & Dickey Gold Supporting Member

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    All I can think of now is the time Moe ordered Curly to “shave some ice.”
     
  5. RayBarbeeMusic

    RayBarbeeMusic Member

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    I've found over the years that shape makes more difference to me than thickness per se. I used to like thin necks, still pretty much do, but a larger carve, even an R9, is still very comfortable *if* it is a soft V, i.e. skinny shoulders that slope in right below the board, even a hard v at the nut going to a soft V quickly...…

    You might try that instead of just thinning it up. I've done quite a few re-shapes without changing much actual "thickness" and not encountered stability issues where I had to do a fret level or a refret after, and I'm a picky sombitch about fretwork.
     
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  6. derekd

    derekd Supporting Member

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    Yeah, this is my experience, also. I typically like fat necks around .95 or so at the nut.

    I bought a used Forshage off of Chris about 3 years back but the neck was too fat. Had him shave it down from 1.0 or so to .95, but mostly he shaved the shoulders going from a fat U shape to a fat C shape more like an older Gibson. Made all the difference in the world. One of my favorites now.

    The neck thickness and shape is make or break on a guitar for me.
     
    Zappatalist likes this.
  7. RayBarbeeMusic

    RayBarbeeMusic Member

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    Last year they changed the neck shape on R9s to match one they actually measured, and it was a soft V. I bought by first R9 last year because of that. Super comfortable neck, absolutely love it.
     
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  8. Jerome4732

    Jerome4732 Member

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    Take it to a luthier that builds guitars as well as repairs them.

    I have a Ritchie Kotzen Made in Japan Tele that I absolutely loved except for the HUGE neck.
    I took it to a friend/guitar-builder/luthier and traded him a good bottle of bourbon to shave the neck. A new neck with the same specs would have been $350-400
    I can't remember how much he shaved off but it wasn't much. I showed him a guitar with a neck profile I like and he pretty much matched it .

    It's my favorite Tele now
     
    Drew816 likes this.
  9. NeuroLogic

    NeuroLogic Supporting Member

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    For more pronounced reductions a hand plane is needed. Does anyone know where you can purchase a really good one?, Especially a two handle one?
     
  10. Echomachine

    Echomachine Member

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    I suggest taking your guitar to a local Luthier.
     
  11. bsacamano

    bsacamano Member

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    Wouldn't a spokeshave be a better bet?
     
  12. NeuroLogic

    NeuroLogic Supporting Member

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    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019 at 9:32 AM
  13. voodoochili12

    voodoochili12 Supporting Member

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    OP, I was told by naysayers to not shave down the neck of my Collings I-35 LC, and I'm glad I didn't listen to them. It turned a guitar I liked a lot into a guitar I will have for life. I did what you are doing now - research, communicate to your luthier, provide specs, etc. I didn't experience a single adverse effect that folks said I would (neck warp, fret job needed, etc.)
     
    Drew816 likes this.

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