Any thoughts on: The Jazz Guitar Method by Jody Fisher OR any suggestions pls!

jazzmonkey007

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256
Hi, I was wondering if any of you had any thoughts this method. I want to learn jazz. I've been playing for a while (about 20 years) mostly blues and also did a Bachelor in pop. If anyone has any opinions to offer on this series or if you think there's a better one, please let me know.

Thanks.
 

harmonicator

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4,599
I really dug his books.

learned a lot from Mastering Jazz Improv and Chord Melody.

I would recommend em.
 

djdrdave

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3,061
I just moved to a new place but is this the alfred music publication? If so i picked it up at barnes and noble a few months back. It looks great just havent had time to dive into it
 

projam619

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1,377
The Fisher series is quite good, but as with any series, ultimately insufficient. There are books considered "canonical", such as the David Baker series, and the Berklee Method. And there's so many others that it gets confusing as to which approach to take. On a personal level I can vouch for the Mel Bay Complete Encyclopedia to Jazz Guitar Lines and Phrases (great lines), books by Robert Conti (street learning over academic method), the Mel Bay Private Lessons series (catered to your interests), Pat Martino Linear Expressions (excellent!), David Stryker's book (good source of idiomatic bebop phrases), books by Jay Umble (more modern stuff), Jeff Bergonzi for jazz pentatonics. Video courses on TrueFire (esp Mimi Fox and Andreas Oberg) and mikes master classes.com are great! For standards, 5 star lessons are available at Barry Greene's website. Also, you may choose to enroll in Jimmy Bruno's, Mark Elf's, and/or Andreas Oberg's online conservatories.

Lately I've re-discovered Scott Henderson's DVD "Jazz Rock Guitar" - its excellent in teaching you jazz scales over maj7, min7, min7flat5, and (alt.) dominant chords. You wont be disappointed...

My journey in learning jazz began with learning 1) jazz blues, 2) rhythm changes, and 3) ii-V-I's (major and minor). I deliberately excised any "bluesy rock" and modern rock-sounding improv from my playing over these formats, which I feel is important (not saying you should just forget blues and jazz - just save it where appropriate). From there, you can delve into standards, beginning with well-known ones like Autumn Leaves, All the Things you Are, Satin Doll, So What, Impressions, etc...Listen to as many different interpretations of the standard you are studying by as many artists possible as much as possible.

Furthermore, it helps to have a great jazz teacher to help you navigate the jazz terrain...

And probably the most important learning step: transcribe solos, or phrases within solos that catch your ear...This way you'll start "speaking" the jazz language.
 
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monkmiles

Silver Supporting Member
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5,082
I tried two of Jody's books and neither clicked with me.

My favorite beginners jazz method is Mimi Fox's Jazz Anatomy.

I've gone through a lot of jazz guitar books actually and would be glad to list more I got a lot out of if you're interested.
 

jazzmonkey007

Member
Messages
256
I tried two of Jody's books and neither clicked with me.

My favorite beginners jazz method is Mimi Fox's Jazz Anatomy.

I've gone through a lot of jazz guitar books actually and would be glad to list more I got a lot out of if you're interested.
Yes please if you can. I've also been told that classes like mikesmasterclasses.com are a good source.

Thanks again
 

monkmiles

Silver Supporting Member
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5,082
Yes please if you can. I've also been told that classes like mikesmasterclasses.com are a good source.

Thanks again
Would be glad to help!

Here's my favorites divided up into categories...

Theory:


The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine
- Contains well explained theory on practically everything!

Guitar Style by Joe Pass
- Good info on chord construction and lots of stuff. (requires sight reading ability)

Comping:

Jazz Anatomy by Mimi Fox (video)- Teaches you the 5 basic jazz forms (Major Blues, Minor Blues, Modal, II V I Major, II V I Minor). Getting these down will help you comp/play through tunes much easier. I wish I had started my jazz guitar learning with this video...but I got it a little later in the game.

Jazz Guitar Comping by Andrew Green - Covers everything about comping except for 4 to the bar stuff.

Comping Styles, Chords & Grooves by Jim Ferguson - Covers 4 to the bar comping but not as much other stuff as Andrew Green's book.

Arpeggios:

Guitar Arpeggio Studies on Jazz Standards by Mimi Fox - Learn your arpeggios and how to play them through tunes.

Jazz Guitar Structures by Andrew Green - Breaks down arpeggios and other stuff into smaller pieces. Teaches how to impose lines over other chord types (for example: minor arps over major chord). This book could also fit under the 'Lines' category I guess.

Lines:

Linear Expressions by Pat Martino - Shows the forms Pat uses and how to go about using them.

Jazz Lines by Joe Pass (video) - Shows Joe's favorite lines based on chord type.

Essential Jazz Lines In The Style Of ... by Corey Christiansen - This whole series is great. My favorite is the one in the style of Joe Pass. The Pass one divides the lines by chord type.
 

jazzmonkey007

Member
Messages
256
Would be glad to help!

Here's my favorites divided up into categories...

Theory:


The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine
- Contains well explained theory on practically everything!

Guitar Style by Joe Pass
- Good info on chord construction and lots of stuff. (requires sight reading ability)

Comping:

Jazz Anatomy by Mimi Fox (video)- Teaches you the 5 basic jazz forms (Major Blues, Minor Blues, Modal, II V I Major, II V I Minor). Getting these down will help you comp/play through tunes much easier. I wish I had started my jazz guitar learning with this video...but I got it a little later in the game.

Jazz Guitar Comping by Andrew Green - Covers everything about comping except for 4 to the bar stuff.

Comping Styles, Chords & Grooves by Jim Ferguson - Covers 4 to the bar comping but not as much other stuff as Andrew Green's book.

Arpeggios:

Guitar Arpeggio Studies on Jazz Standards by Mimi Fox - Learn your arpeggios and how to play them through tunes.

Jazz Guitar Structures by Andrew Green - Breaks down arpeggios and other stuff into smaller pieces. Teaches how to impose lines over other chord types (for example: minor arps over major chord). This book could also fit under the 'Lines' category I guess.

Lines:

Linear Expressions by Pat Martino - Shows the forms Pat uses and how to go about using them.

Jazz Lines by Joe Pass (video) - Shows Joe's favorite lines based on chord type.

Essential Jazz Lines In The Style Of ... by Corey Christiansen - This whole series is great. My favorite is the one in the style of Joe Pass. The Pass one divides the lines by chord type.

That's awesome! Thanks a lot.
 

rotren

Member
Messages
2,875
I concur with projam619 - excellent advice there, as well as what jazzmonke007 mentions. This should keep you busy!
 

MartinPiana

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,424
I also agree that no one book does it. But one of the books I keep coming back to for improv, which hasn't yet been mentioned, is

Jazz Improvisation for Guitar: A Melodic Approach by Garrison Fewell

It's based on some patterns, but they're multi-position, arpeggio-based patterns that really helped me move quickly to some places I'd been crawling toward. He also shows how various masters' lines utilize these patterns. ... these were liberating - as opposed to confining - patterns for me
 

NeuroLogic

Member
Messages
1,357
I've been thru tons of books,dvds. Larry Coryell's 3 volume Jazz guitar Dvds are the best. Exactly to the point with in context illustrations.
 




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