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Any thoughts on this design?

Deed_Poll

Member
Messages
3,088
Let me know what you think! I call this one the Unica.

The bridge design has three blades that each house a saddle on each side, which grips into place by tightening a bolt through the blade slots. The height adjustment is a grub screw that interfaces with the top edge of the blade, which is 2mm wide.

The blades are fixed in with screws from the underside of the body and poke up through slots in the top. Offsetting the blades differently allows for any eccentricity of multiscale, and even single scale functionality.

I find a lot of multiscale bridges have a lot of a diagonal aesthetic, which I find a bit jarring depending on the body design.

The tuners will be an ABM unit recessed into the body and accessible between the two body "wings", which will also protect them. The strings will pass through individual fluted channels / louvres (not pictured) to feed the recessed tuners and achieve a suitable break angle over the bridge saddles.

I'm currently designing a gas-spring-operated kick stand that doubles as a rear route cover to access the electronics (like the trunk of a car).

The output jack will go in the chiseled section at the lower-right corner of the design. The body is fully carved front and rear, and tapers for ergonomics. The centre of mass should have the guitar sitting naturally at about 25-45 degrees to the horizontal.

I put the design next to a Tele style so you can get an idea of the scale. The model below is 26"-24" scale IIRC.

Let me know your thoughts! Cheers.

Dan

 

j.s.tonehound

Member
Messages
7,476
Seems like an interesting take on the Ergo design. Looks especially Star Wars-y in that grey render!

I'd like to see more of the bridge design as that looks most interesting to me.
 

Deed_Poll

Member
Messages
3,088
Seems like an interesting take on the Ergo design. Looks especially Star Wars-y in that grey render!

I'd like to see more of the bridge design as that looks most interesting to me.
Cheers!

Here's a close-up of the bridge. Apologies for the photo of a screen, imgur was misbehaving on my desktop that day.

It's not obvious from this pic, but the blade pieces rise up through slots in the top.



The saddles are identical on each side and slot together so they can be set in the same position if required.

:)
 

j.s.tonehound

Member
Messages
7,476
Cheers!

Here's a close-up of the bridge. Apologies for the photo of a screen, imgur was misbehaving on my desktop that day.

It's not obvious from this pic, but the blade pieces rise up through slots in the top.



The saddles are identical on each side and slot together so they can be set in the same position if required.

:)
That looks excellent. Industrial minimalism, sort of!
 

Deed_Poll

Member
Messages
3,088
Thanks I'm glad you like it! I worked on some renders today. I still need to model the frets, decide on a nut / string clamp, and tidy up a few corners on the body yet :)





 

PhilF

Member
Messages
568
I love the uniqueness of it, and the bridge design.

Questions/concerns about the bridges/saddles:

How wide are those blades, and what material do you intend on using? From the pictures it looks like they are something like .125" ish wide. This would lend itself to an awfully small screw size coming through the body. #4-40s? The reason I ask about material is that the set (grub) screws are likely going to eat into the blade material very quickly since there is only one contact point. Stainless might be ok, or some kind of hard chrome coated steel. '

Another concern is the roller that holds each string. I'm not entirely sure that is going to be quite stable enough to avoid tilting of either the roller on the green pin, or the green pin in the "arm". Certainly going to depend on the tolerances you are trying to hold on those parts. Each bridge piece could end up a couple hundred bucks a piece when a shop is asked to hold proper tolerances on those pieces.

I take it the "middle piece" that houses the set screws have a small male diameter poking out both sides to go into each arm? If so, very cool, I like it.

Those are just kind of first glance concerns from a mechanical engineer. Nothing that couldn't be solved, although it could involve making them less aesthetically pleasing.

Nice work!!
 

Deed_Poll

Member
Messages
3,088
Cheers Phil! Very valuable feedback. The plan was to use two pieces of L-shaped 1mm stainless butted up to each other so they look kind of like a bracket

Like this:

_][_
^ ^ screws go in here

I guess we'll wait and see as far as the arms drooping goes! You might be right that it needs some more work. I thought about doubling the thickness of the blades and having the fixing screw simply butt up to the blade on each side, instead of having the green screw grip the saddle onto the blade. (losing the slots in the blades).

Here's a detail shot of the sides of the saddles, feedback more than welcome!

Cheers

 

whoismarykelly

Oh look! This is a thing I can change!
Messages
8,141
Based on your renders its unlikely that this design will have enough tension over those rollers to keep the strings on them. Especially if the player has a strong pick attack.
 

KGWagner

Member
Messages
3,243
Depending on the roller slot depth, that may not be a big problem.

I'm not seeing anything that holds the saddle's positions, though. Once the intonation is set, what keeps the saddle from shifting back and forth?
 

Deed_Poll

Member
Messages
3,088
Based on your renders its unlikely that this design will have enough tension over those rollers to keep the strings on them. Especially if the player has a strong pick attack.
I think they should be ok, the side-on render of the bridge probably shows the wrong angle since I recessed the tailpiece. Also the bass strings will have a greater break angle than the treble strings, and it's almost always the bass strings that have this problem. On a Jazzmaster, it's mostly because the threads of the bridge saddles are too small to take the bass strings. I also have a very small break angle on my Flying V with Maestro, which had the same problem (again only on the bottom E) which was remedied by cutting the string slots deeper. The angle can't be more than about 5 or 10 degrees on that guitar and it works great.

Depending on the roller slot depth, that may not be a big problem.

I'm not seeing anything that holds the saddle's positions, though. Once the intonation is set, what keeps the saddle from shifting back and forth?
I have two options. Above is the second option, which involves tightening one side of the saddle onto the other using a bolt that travels through a slot in the "blade". This subtly bends the saddle and grips it onto the blade.

The first option was not to use the slot, and just to tighten the saddle onto the blade using a set screw.
 

bard2dbone

Member
Messages
1,269
I think the 'corner' where it would sit on your leg needs to have a curve, in stead of a corner. Better ergonomics, especially if that's your main goal.
 




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