Anybodies G on the low E string in tune?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Webfoot, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. Phil the Kill Bill V2 guy

    Phil the Kill Bill V2 guy Member

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    I tune so the open E and the 3rd fret G are equally in/out of tune. No matter which guitar I'm using.
    It usually means the open E is very slightly flat, and the G is very slightly sharp.
    As opposed to a perfect open E with a noticeably sharp G....which if it's the root sound in a chord you start doubting your higher octaves, and you're all messed up then.
     
  2. supergenius365

    supergenius365 Supporting Member

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    First time I read this I thought it said “yoko”.
     
  3. thesjkexperienc

    thesjkexperienc ^^^ I made this guitar^^^

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    I tune to a fretted G on the low E. I have a heavy right hand and it just works better. Of course you should make sure your nut is cut correctly, but nearly every guitar I’ve ever had would go sharp on the low E string.
     
  4. EdFarmer

    EdFarmer Member

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    I don't think that the OP answered the question about the F and F# on the low E string. As noted, these should be a problem as well if the nut is the issue. If they are in tune, a close look at the third fret is in order. It may be that the top is not dressed properly and the string is contacting the front or back edge of the fret . . . I don't think that the OP has been back and he didn't say if the G is sharp or flat . . .
     
  5. Da Geezer

    Da Geezer Supporting Member

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  6. smithguitars

    smithguitars Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the Great Tail Chase Tuning and Intonation Thread.
     
  7. GuitarMakerNyc

    GuitarMakerNyc Member

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    Just play G alt and call it a day...
     
  8. Don Rusk

    Don Rusk BearFoot FX Owner

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    Yup, even more so on acoustics with big strings ..... I finally started tuning the fat E to the G string (press third fret G while also plucking 4th string open G) ...problem solved.
     
  9. gunslinger

    gunslinger Member

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    I'm having a problem there too. I'm thinking the nut is too high there. Or this just may be the way it is with equal temperament tuning.
     
  10. Valves-R-Us

    Valves-R-Us Member

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    I noticed the low G note off making a warbling affect against other (G chord) notes blended in. I pretty much obsessed with the low E trying a super light touch etc. Thinking the OP may have experienced the same? It was much later before I discovered that low F and F# were sharp as well. The same proved true on the A string where all frets through the third were sharp. Deepening both string slots corrected it.

    There is magic tuning to be had. Checkout Compensated Nuts that add back goodness to open strings. They stagger the strings like bridges. They talk about piano tuners tweaking some keys slightly sharp or flat for "sweetening" the sound for human ears. Compensated nut makers claim the same deal. Pretty sure my ears can't detect these things but I do know a sucky G on the bottom. A proper tune should read within 1-2 cents of the fretted note anywhere on the neck when depressed with the same force. Tuners are your friend for baseline setup. If mid-neck notes play in tune yet the lower frets are sharp - This is all Nuts!
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2020
    EdFarmer likes this.

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