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Anyone else ever get burnt out from concerts?

Messages
2,304
I've been to probably 40 concerts in my life. Which isn't that much compared to some peopl, but that's in 5 years. I'm seeing the Black Keys in March, but besides the fact I want to see Iggy and the Stooges, Mudhoney, Dinosuar Jr, Clapton and Neil Young, I have no interest in going to any other concerts.

I'm like burnt out from them, I'm an early bird, so it kind of ruins the next day. I used to love them, and still do but I feel like i've been to so many.
 

tsar nicholas

Member
Messages
8,673
I actually stopped going to pop shows for a couple years, like between GZA in 2007 and like probably 2009 when I started organizing events. I was tired of the idiot crowds disrupting my enjoyment of the music, tired of paying for bar drinks, tired of escalating ticket prices and big Ticketmonster fees, etc.


Then I realized that I was being @#$%ing stupid and a wuss. Glad I went back to seeing shows often.
 
Messages
2,304
I actually stopped going to pop shows for a couple years, like between GZA in 2007 and like probably 2009 when I started organizing events. I was tired of the idiot crowds disrupting my enjoyment of the music, tired of paying for bar drinks, tired of escalating ticket prices and big Ticketmonster fees, etc.


Then I realized that I was being @#$%ing stupid and a wuss. Glad I went back to seeing shows often.
The turn off is the dicketmaster fees. I bought 3 Allman Bros. Tickets and the fees endef up costing the price of 60 dollars.
 

Rockledge

Senior Member
Messages
5,553
I got burned out on them when they quit being fun music experiences and started being huge money grubbing extravaganzas.
I liked rock era music, when you payed 7 bucks to spend the evening listening to bands play on big gear to big crowds and have a big party together.
When it started becoming insanely expensive and it started being about light shows and lasers and costumes and all that boring **** I quit going.
I would far rather go see bar bands.
Rock era concerts were mostly just like going to giant bar gigs anyway.
Bar bands still capture the true excitement of live music the way concerts did back then.
And I really am not into paying 3 bucks for a plastic cup of water with beer foam on the top of it after being given a rectal probe before being allowed past the gate out of fear someone might actually snap a picture or two.
It all got very undesirable for me years ago.
Every great now and then I still go to a concert, but I still enjoy the bar bands more.
 

vortexxxx

Member
Messages
10,803
I used to go to a ton of concerts in the early 80s. But list my interest at the time.
There days I only go to selective concerts. Usually once a year Unless I get put on the guestlist.
 

chucke99

Member
Messages
5,121
between 1975 and 1977, I saw about 50 concerts, and not in little bars or anything. But what do expect from a 16 to 18-year-old? After that I slowed down, but still saw five or so a year until the mid 1980s. After that, one or two a year for a few more years, then nothing for about 20 years. Recently, I've seen a few "reunion" tours, but nothing regular.
 

monty

Member
Messages
22,752
I used to go to a ton, now I limit pretty much to smaller venues or bands I missed before.
Still love live music.
 

Ethn Hayabusa

Member
Messages
1,491
Totally. I almost never go to shows anymore. All the people, the noise, getting home super late, the expense, bad sound quality, etc. I think I've been to too many shows.
 

Rockledge

Senior Member
Messages
5,553
Totally. I almost never go to shows anymore. All the people, the noise, getting home super late, the expense, bad sound quality, etc. I think I've been to too many shows.
Bad sound quality. Man, that one sure gets me.
There is absolutely no excuse for bad sound , not with all the technology and training available for sound engineers.
 

sixty2strat

Member
Messages
11,855
Been going to shows since 1977. Stopped counting stubbs in 1994 and had 436 that made it home. Ticket prices got crazy, the shows were getting more by the numbers each year, so the fun thrill disappeared. Yes bad sound and the morons their to party for the "event" music seemed to be asecondary concern to: band ,promtoer and fan So faded away over the last 15 years. Since 2000 I have seen Jeff Beck 4 times Ravi Shanker, The Philly orchestra3 times, Noel Gahallager, John Paul Jones 2 times, Black Crows, P Furs, Bert Jansch, Cracker and 2 or 3 others. All cheap seats in small venues ...exceptthe crows and that was the least impressive show. I just dont care, care morefor my own gigs I guess.
 

cbpickin

Tweed Supporting Member
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,048
I still go see a fair amount of live shows, but I am lucky that our area has a few really good, small venues that book fairly large names. I probably go to about 2 larger venue or arena shows a year, but I can go see someone like Larry Carlton (a few months ago), David Lindley (2 weeks ago) or Jimmie Vaughan (past two summers) with 150 people for about $25-30 and be 10 feet away from them.
Like others, I only go to arena shows if is someone I have missed, like The Police a few year back. I saw Van Halen in 1984, so I'm probably not going to pay hundreds to go see them on teh jumbo Tron TV with thousands.
 

shane8

Member
Messages
31,494
i went to many in my youth but now find the enormity of big gigs unsavoury - logistics and expense

i go to local (free) gigs a bit and watch concert vids - the idea of being in an arena with 10,000 others isn't my thing these days
 

LarryN

Member
Messages
955
It's almost like going out of town on a flight these days. Reminds me of a Roman coliseum. More of a spectacle than a musical experience, and we get to pay for it. I was at an Allman Bros. show in a big venue, 12th row and the bass notes were just SPLATT all over everything with no pitch. It wasn't the bass player. It was the sound system. We ended up walking around trying to hear the music. The Jeff Beck show here was well put together, though. Come to think of it, I went to the 15th row for a few minutes and Narada(drummer) was just too overpowering. Back to the balcony.
 
Messages
861
my girlfriend and i almost exclusively stick to local shows.

we tend to be friends with the bands... and its far more enjoyable.

we'll make a few exceptions... but rarely.

we get more excited for an underground band from LA coming through than whatever indie flavor of the month is coming through
 

Jon C

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
17,553
Avoid Ticketmaster, go see smaller bands in clubs and bars.

Agree. I skip almost all large venue shows, I have no patience for the fees, the zoo atmosphere, etc. Been to hundreds of shows since 1972 or so but I don't miss the arenas/stadiums, etc. at all.
 

filtersweep

Member
Messages
4,799
A big show/concert costs over $100 around here, and as others have said, the sound quality is terrible. I was dragged to a U2 'concert' at United Center or whatever it is called in Chicago, and felt like I was watching a movie in a theater (meaning I was completely disconnected from a "live" experience). I saw Springsteen in Oslo--- outdoors where it was completely "general standing" and I didn't dare move the entire performance, for fear I would never make it back to my wife (or our great standing spot, where we stood for two or three hours waiting for it to start). That was actually a good performance.

The only real value out of going to a big show is being able to say that I saw "so-and-so" live. Most of the big concerts are nostalgia acts these days (including U2 or Springsteen if you listen to their current material). I wouldn't mind seeing a band like Muse or The Dead Weather live... but I would much prefer a club setting.

I guess I define a "concert" as occurring in a venue holding thousands.... versus a 'show' in a club.
 

kelvinator60

Member
Messages
891
Small club is where it as at. The best music is not the big name acts. Up close and personal with no light show is how it should be.
 

Rockledge

Senior Member
Messages
5,553
A big show/concert costs over $100 around here, and as others have said, the sound quality is terrible. I was dragged to a U2 'concert' at United Center or whatever it is called in Chicago, and felt like I was watching a movie in a theater (meaning I was completely disconnected from a "live" experience). I saw Springsteen in Oslo--- outdoors where it was completely "general standing" and I didn't dare move the entire performance, for fear I would never make it back to my wife (or our great standing spot, where we stood for two or three hours waiting for it to start). That was actually a good performance.

The only real value out of going to a big show is being able to say that I saw "so-and-so" live. Most of the big concerts are nostalgia acts these days (including U2 or Springsteen if you listen to their current material). I wouldn't mind seeing a band like Muse or The Dead Weather live... but I would much prefer a club setting.

I guess I define a "concert" as occurring in a venue holding thousands.... versus a 'show' in a club.
That is another thing that is missing in the current music scene. When rock was around a "concert" wasn't always in a huge place. As often as not they were in theaters and whatever the local downtown venue was.
Places like the Agora. Which I think was previously a vaudeville theater. Old Vaudeville theaters and dance halls were VERY active concert places in the late sixties and early seventies.
Sometimes they were in arenas, but they were not hugely overproduced outragiously expensive extravaganzas, they were still kind of laid back and quaint. Concerts then were more like huge indoor festivals, like giant parties. The only difference between the ones in arenas and theaters was the amount of people, in all other aspects they were the same.
I always preferred the smaller ones in theaters, they had the best sound and there were no bad seats.

Small club is where it as at. The best music is not the big name acts. Up close and personal with no light show is how it should be.
One thing for sure, when a band doesn't have all the tinsel and glitter and colored lights they damn well better have the music. Which is another thing about when rock was around. It was about the music, not the gift paper and ribbons.
 




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