Anyone hate a new guitar/amp at first?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by jzucker, Jan 16, 2008.


  1. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    I'm noticing that whenever I get a new guitar or amp I dislike it for the first few days. I'm starting to suspect that the old adage we know what we like/like what we know is really true. When you get something that sounds too different, we dislike it at first but then once we learn to appreciate the new sounds, we grow to like it too.

    I think this is human nature and why folks will like almost anything played on radio if they hear it enough....

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Samba

    Samba Member

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    Every time I bring home something new, it immediately goes in for critical scrutiny. I've never really understood the "honeymoon period" that folks talk about, as I use the initial period to be objective as possible in order to decide if the guitar is worthy of the harem. If not, I make plans to flip it at the earliest convenience. Thus all of my new acquisitions are guilty until proven innocent.
     
  3. dewey decibel

    dewey decibel Member

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    I don't know, I think a lot of times the opposite is true. Sort of a "grass is always greener" thing- something new seems good just because it's different. I guess that could be the "honeymoon peroid".

    Myself, I rarely get new gear, and when i do it's usually a hand-me-down of some sort, so it's hard to say. But of the last couple things I've bought I've been pretty manic about the way I felt for the first couple weeks- one day loving it and the next day hating it.
     
  4. JZG

    JZG Member

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    Lately, I find myself settling into gear a little bit more and being patient with it. I have an amp an guitar, both of which I've had for about a year or so, that I wasn't really thrilled with for quite awhile after getting them. I perservered and have now found so many new and inspiring tones, and I think it's also helped my playing technique as well. I think what Robben Ford said in that recent GP interview was spot on - (paraphrased) "You have to fight with a guitar and amp for a long time to get it to do what you want it to."

    The other trap that I've been trying to get out of is trying to make a piece of gear do something that it's really not meant to do. Like trying to make a Tweed Deluxe do saturated, violin-type tones as an example. I think that's where a lot of people get frustrated. They don't have the right tools for what they're trying to do, but I guess that's part of the process.

    In a nutshell, I agree that "we know what we like and like what we know." I think it's a good idea though to have some gear that's outside your box as it may help take your playing in directions it normally wouldn't go to.
     
  5. Paul Conway

    Paul Conway Member

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    Yes. Usually magnified by the fact that I don't have lots of money and rarely buy gear compared to most on here. Maybe I need cognitive behavioural therapy or something..
     
  6. Mike9

    Mike9 Supporting Member

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    I'm in the other boat - the guitars I'm building keep getting better and better and I wonder if I'm worthy of them - :roll

    But I basically can't leave anything stock either - even my PRS needs something like an electronics upgrade.
     
  7. rob2001

    rob2001 Member

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    I ran rack rigs for lots of years. An ADA MP-1 preamp was my main sound. After much thought I decided to go with a simpler rig. My buddy say's "dude, just get a JCM 800. So I did. At first I hated it. Seemed cold, harsh, hard to play etc...I had no idea on how to set it up. I still used the rack live but the ADA went on the fritz and I had to use the 800 all by itself. I was floored how good it sounded in the mix and I had one of my best nights live. I sold the ADA and I don't miss it one bit. I think it's tough to break away from farmiliar things, even if the new piece of gear is really a better fit. I think I hated the 800 at first because I was so used to the ADA.
     
  8. morlll

    morlll Supporting Member

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    I just went through that with an acoustic. It wasn't hate that's a lot stronger than what I felt.

    I bought a Larrivee L09 rosewood spruce to replace a broken D shaped walnut spruce guitar.

    The new one sounded very different then the old one. After about 2 weeks I got used to the clarity that the Larrivee has.

    When I got my repaired Dreadnaught back it sounded muddy in comparison. I still like it but it's nice to have another sound.
     
  9. kanderson

    kanderson Member

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    I have to agree with you. Every new amp or guitar I get, I hate it at first, then after a few weeks of tweaking and playing time I learn to love them. I think it's just a matter of finding out the strengths and weaknesses of each and playing to the strengths. Although, there are some that you just can't coax "your sound" out of and after a while if it just doesn't work...those are the ones that get flipped. At least that's my experience.
     
  10. SW33THAND5

    SW33THAND5 Member

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    i believe that there is some truth to what the original poster says.

    i also believe that a lot of people here (from what i read) are either fickle or they really just do not know what the want or like.

    and thirdly...i also attribute it to the fact that you become more familiar with the settings and learn to dial it in a little better.
     
  11. PFCG

    PFCG Member

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    the active pickups in my alembic. i still dont like them to this day, but i dont despise them like i used to. im going to change them soon i hope.
     
  12. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    Agreed. We also fall victim to the flavor of the month club.
     
  13. Pete Galati

    Pete Galati Member

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    A lot of times, guitars that become my favorites are really bad when I first play them.

    On my first attempt at building an Esquire, I used a used GFS Tele pickup that I had sitting around, and the results were an unusually annoying sounding guitar. So I ordered a Duncan Antiquity Broadcaster pickup, and a nice set of Callaham knobs, and all of a sudden it was a great guitar!
     
  14. jackaroo

    jackaroo Member

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    JZ- I agree. I'm usually looking for reasons to not buy stuff. I'm really hard on my guitars and amps from a critical perspective, and only have a few that have met/surpassed my wants/needs. Everything else is fighting to stay in my studio. That said I don't buy stuff that I hate when I'm in the store - obviously I'm looking for something that connects with me deeply.

    I rarely buy anything that I intend on keeping longterm on a whim. Usually there's an exhaustive amount of research that goes into any real financial commitment for me. So I get very little joy from the process, more of a relief actually. I labor over the cost of some gear too much, being a new Dad and all.

    There are some guitars however that I've bought for a session, knowing I'd be selling shortly there after. Or deals that were too good to pass up, where I knew if it didn't work out I could sell the guitar quickly for what I paid for it.

    I've pretty much settled into my core collection of tools. Things and sounds I must have- For something new to come into that inner circle- it's got to be special and different, or totally surpass it's model equivalent in my "tool" box.

    Things I'm looking for-

    A great Gretsch w/Bigsby
    A Better Strat/ or mod mine with better PUS
    A RW board LP
    An SG special from the 60's
    A nicer archtop
    A J-45
    A 30 watt tweed amp
    A Marshall style amp and a great cab


    Jeez...looks like a lot actually! I'd better get shopping ;-)


    What I don't understand is how I can look at pictures and think... " I want that...It looks like it sounds good" That's just a strange thing. For example, the Grosh Strat you're selling- I get a feeling it's a great guitar for me. Weird? It's got Birds eye maple, satin finish neck, 11/16 neck width, pua inlays and a 2 post trem- All things I can't stand- yet that guitar is telling me something "Psst buy me".


    Creepy.


    Babbling-

    J
     
  15. Rossl

    Rossl Member

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    This just happened to me with the Boss/Roalnd space echo pedal RE20. When I first got it, I think I expected too much (?) I was initially disappointed. After I plyed with it and tweaked it for about a week I started to like it more and more.

    I als read the manual which in this case made me aware of some settings that are not at all obvious by just playing around with the pedal
     

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