Anyone here try a Tone rite on their acoustic?

Mark EL

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
570
This has been an incendiary topic on the various acoustic fora.

Yes, I acquired one several years ago and have used it with varying degrees of success on a few acoustics. On one "high end" guitar in particular, it created a dramatic, desireable and long lasting improvement, over about a 2 week period of regular use. I was, and am, extremely happy.

On some other guitars it created a spectrum of modest improvements, which were discernable to me as a long term owner of these instruments. "Opened them up a bit", I'd say.

On some guitars there was no apparent change.

Placement makes a difference. Also time. I Don't think the recommended 72 hours is enough. Also, you need to change the strings after treating the instrument for long periods.

I have become aware that some small builders are routinely toneriting their new instruments for a week or more before sending them to their customers. Not a lot of publicity about that. Also, quite a few violinists, cellists, etc., seem to use them regularly to "keep their instruments warm".

Truth is, for around $100 used,what could it hurt? It's mildly vibrating the strings near the bridge, that's all. Acoustic guitar owners are a funny crew. A lot of Martin guys are very conservative minded, for example, and can go on about "breaking them in naturally" when discussing a TR. Moreover, there are LOTS of TR commenters who have never tried one at all, yet seem to know everything about them.

Lastly, the TR is not likely to improve laminates, solid bodies, carbon fiber etc. I would not hesitate to use one on a carved arch top.
 

zombywoof

Member
Messages
5,061
The theory behind the Tone Rite is that it loosens the wood grain. Problem is the molecules settle back in soon after you stop using the gizmo so there is no long term impact. Might be useful to get through a gig I guess.
 

Mark EL

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
570
I'm going to post about capos so someone can tell me how "you can make one out of a pencil and rubber bands". Lol.
 

TheoDog

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
20,927
I would be interested in borrowing one.

In october, I bought a 2009 Guild. I am fairly positive it had original factory strings on it (7 years old) and just sat unsold at a Sam Ash. I know it has some play in due. I suspect a Tone Rite treatment would improve the overall vibe of my new acoustic.

I bought a new Guild GAD Jumbo several years ago and by the time I sold it, the tone had matured nicely. Even my wife's MIC Blueridge is considerably smooth sounding 10 years in.
 

s2y

Member
Messages
20,603
I know there's a 95% a tone rite discussion will be locked and deleted at the Acoustic Guitar Forum. :confused:
 

Dr. Tweedbucket

Deluxe model available !!!11
Messages
48,335
So far I have 24 hours on my Hummingboid .... I think I'm going to do the full 72 hours and then try it out. :knitting
 

62Tele

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,109
Made a definite improvement in my Adirondack top Collings CJ - need to do it again actually. Seriously doubt it would do squat for my teles.
 

Mark EL

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
570
Just adding, the TR will not turn a sows ear into a silk purse. Not to bash Gibsons, but.......there are Gibsons and gibsons.

The report on the Adi Collings CJ above is very believable. I've heard the same regarding effect on a newish, somewhat famous adi topped Lowden, of all things, reported very reliably indeed.

I'd give it 144 hours or more, OP, checking at the 72 hour mark because, hey, of course you're gonna do that! Don't forget, the strings are likely going to go dead. Nevertheless, you might be able to discern differences in the guitar's general ability to vibrate freely when strummed.

It never ceases to amaze me how controversial the TR is. The bottom line, as stated above, is that it doesn't work (equally) on everything. When it does work, often it works in a big way.

I really don't think the "theory" behind it is limited to changes in the wood substructure. In fact, I think it often has more to do with the physical associations, or linkages, in the entire guitar. That's part of the problem when trying to assess the effect - it may be doing, or not doing, different things to different degrees in different instruments. A multivariate system, for sure. Hard to present any results other than anecdotal. And hey, doubters gonna doubt! WTH do I care?!

Prof. Tweed, do you have the patient suspended on a stand with the device close to, if not actually touching, the bridge? Can you feel the entire instrument vibrating?
 

Jon C

Member
Messages
17,877
I've had one for years. It works better on some instruments "better" than others but it definitely works.

That's it basically IMO/ IME ... how much it works varies based on instrument construction and a whole lot of variables... on a guitar like my '76 Cumpiano that's nearly alive from the minute you pick it up, no need to "wake it up" and get going so little effect from ToneRite. On my Taylor 812C (a very good one), much more noticeable effect after leaving it on for a while (a couple/few days or more). It's not something you use once and forget it, if you don't keep playing an instrument it may benefit from a TR session after a layoff. It will not vault a guitar past its inherent sonic capabilities (no silk purse from sow's ear, as noted).
 




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