Anyone leave a high paying job due to major stress?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Ryno1331, May 17, 2019.

  1. MrSteve

    MrSteve Member

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    I interviewed with WalMart about 15 years ago. Starting salary was $110k, so you are probably on the mark. Peter Magowan, former managing partner of the SF Giants and former CEO of Safeway said the most stressful job he ever had was Store Manager.
     
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  2. Jp2558

    Jp2558 Member

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    I'm retiring a bit early for this simple reason. I loved being a programmer, but hate being a manager. July 8 and I'm outta there.
     
  3. Ryno1331

    Ryno1331 Supporting Member

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    Already some good advice and I really appreciate hearing your views or experiences.
     
  4. Ryno1331

    Ryno1331 Supporting Member

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    I was going to be a teacher and wish I would've followed that path. Ended up learning about no child left behind and the political bs and bailed. I still wonder if I really screwed up.

    I'm looking into teaching after I move on from my business but although I have a doctorate (I'm a veterinarian) there aren't many teaching opportunities with that degree. There is a local technician school that may be a possibility.
     
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  5. Tom CT

    Tom CT Old Supporting Member Gold Supporting Member

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    I'd never leave due to diminished stress. :rimshot
     
  6. Matt Jones

    Matt Jones Member

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    I don't know what state you're in but look into getting a CTE Credential. It's for people coming out of specific careers and wanting to get into teaching. Works as single subject for high school as well as adult ed. You need to get hired and sponsored by the district and have so many thousands of hours in your field before proceeding.
     
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  7. NeedmoreCrunch

    NeedmoreCrunch Member

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    :wave

    Stress is a killer. Had to take medication to recover. Never Again.
     
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  8. Losov

    Losov Member

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    Yes. I left something that paid well but was high stress. When I changed careers I ended up doing something that I loved. It turns out to have paid more than I was making in the first job, but was so personally rewarding that I would have done it even if it paid less.
     
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  9. tonyhay

    tonyhay Member

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    I’m often a bit surprised when it is suggested that people in high-stress jobs somehow don’t earn the high wages that often go with those jobs. Not everyone wants those jobs or can handle them. And the more stress there is, the fewer people can handle it.
     
  10. Guinness Lad

    Guinness Lad Silver Supporting Member

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    From what I saw working in corporate America, every step of the ladder took a touch more of your soul. Pretty soon you end up dead and hollow. I think it's better to make enough, but not so much that you have a target on your back, or are asked to do endless things because you're the "Muckity Muck" and this is required.
     
  11. jalmer

    jalmer Member

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    Back when I made a decent salary I had to manage my job within publishing deadlines. I had a long commute, long pressure cooker days and eventually the company imploded. I always fantasized about just straight away quitting, but had a young family and mortgage. Now I make half as much but don't have that anxiety. Just nervous about growing old and no future job opps.
     
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  12. Jon C

    Jon C Silver Supporting Member

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    I passed on 2 promotions to senior executive positions.

    I didn't need the marginal pay increase (no kids, always saved) and didn't want or need the additional b.s.

    So I remained in my subject matter expert/ non-supervisoy management position. Never ever regretted it.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2019
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  13. Madison

    Madison Supporting Member

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    Nope, stuck it out for 30 and retired. Advice: look for ways to cope.
     
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  14. direwolf

    direwolf Supporting Member

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    If it aint fun, why do it.
     
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  15. TonePilot

    TonePilot Supporting Member

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    Yeah and I regretted it. Had to start over. Took many years to climb back to the standard of living I was used to. There are ways of dealing with stress that you should maybe try like meditation, yoga, exercise, etc.
     
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  16. CheckSix

    CheckSix Gold Supporting Member

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    Same here, except I haven't retired yet. Every job I had, had stress and I learned to just roll with it.... then about 21 years ago, I got to senior management roles and it just gets heavier and heavier.... but you learn how to deal with it. One thing that really helps, is if you really enjoy what you're doing. 42 years of post university career and still going!

    BTW, I've been flying airplanes most of my life (not for a living) and I think that has helped a lot on how to focus and stay calm under pressure.
     
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  17. DCross

    DCross Member

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    I could've dealt with the stressful, high paying job if I at least had had a stable home life, but I was in a marriage to someone who didn't love me. I ended up stressed almost to the point of suicide and was jobless and homeless for a while. Really the home life was the worst part - not having a loving, supportive wife was more damaging to my heart and soul than the accounting work.

    But things are much better now, although I make much less than I used to.
     
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  18. Bluedano1

    Bluedano1 Member

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    In 2007 I left a low-paying job ( more like needing to abort an unforeseen career direction...) due to major stress, and what did I do?

    Tried to play music full time! ( still trying, Ha!) Me so smart!
     
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  19. AaeCee

    AaeCee Member

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    Mine can go from intensely stressful to rather serene. It pays very well and that can be part of the stress factor itself, as it's indirectly tied to performance.

    Thing is, I'm pretty certain that anything less variable and more calm would leave me pretty bored, so the trade-off still makes sense for me. If it ever doesn't, I'll likely retire.
     
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  20. guitargeek6298

    guitargeek6298 Member

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    I recently left a job due to high stress; it was high paying to me, maybe not the proverbial $2500/wk, but definitely more than I thought I would ever make. But I'm only 36, young family, sole provider, etc, and I was working 60-70 hours a week, stressed or beyond belief, and it was seriously effecting my home life, but I felt trapped because I didn't think I could find something that was less stress but similar pay.

    Well, an old boss of mine reached out to me out of the blue, asked if I was interested in working for him again. We sat down a couple times, settled on a salary, and I've been working for him for 3 months now. It wasn't as much money, I took about a 5k/yr pay cut and the benefits aren't as good, but I'm working at least 20 hours a week less than I was. It's not a perfect fit, and I'll likely want to move on after a couple years, but so far it's been a good change. I feel like I'm getting my life back, I have time to play in the band at church again, and I'm seeing my family every day, so that's been good.
     
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