Anyone make a strat hardtail conversion bridge?

stuco

Member
Messages
848
Are there any good options other than filling the trem cavity, using a block, using extra springs, etc? I'd like a permanently converted hardtail bridge from my am standard strat.
 
Messages
1,596
Interested in this as well . . . . . .
I prefer my particular Strats this way using 5 springs as it seems to keep things a little more "lively" and fluid.
 

Chris Scott

Member
Messages
9,352
In a word - no, at least that I know of.

The hardtail has a distinct sound that is not for everybody. If you like the sound of your guitar, the two most-used solution (block and/or 5 springs tightened fully) is really the way to go.

The only way I would imagine to be the "right" way to convert a trem-style Strat to hardtail would involve considerably more work than would be realistic, at least imo. The Trem-o-no is a nice option as well, come to think of it...

..try a hardtail, and if you like the sound, buy one!:aok
 

stuco

Member
Messages
848
In a word - no, at least that I know of.

The hardtail has a distinct sound that is not for everybody. If you like the sound of your guitar, the two most-used solution (block and/or 5 springs tightened fully) is really the way to go.

The only way I would imagine to be the "right" way to convert a trem-style Strat to hardtail would involve considerably more work than would be realistic, at least imo. The Trem-o-no is a nice option as well, come to think of it...

..try a hardtail, and if you like the sound, buy one!:aok

Unfortunately fender makes very few hardtail strats nowadays. I used to have a robert cray model, very nice. This is an american strat that means a lot to me. I like to post a topic like this every once in awhile to see if there is anthing new out there. Someone should really make a quality replacement bridge for this purpose. The closest I know of is the custom shop parts drop top bridge. Apparently it was kind of a pos though and now discontinued...
 
Messages
1,185
Go get some metal, a drill, and a vice. Buy 6 longer screws for the saddles. Make a new bridge that fits with the existing pivot point screws on one end, and is a little longer on the other end to extend past the block cavity so it's sitting over wood.
Drill and countersink a couple holes toward this end.
Drill 6 holes for the saddle retaining screws
Clamp this 6-hole side in a vice and bend 90 degrees
Drill some holes in your guitar, get the remaining screws to bolt bridge to body, then install the old saddles with their new longer screws into the new bridge. Set intonation and enjoy.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
37,164
I would block, with tight-fitting wood, on both sides of the inertia block inside the trem cavity. That's the easier more conventional method.
 

dharmafool

Member
Messages
1,192
I contacted 2TEK in February about retrofitting one of their hardtail guitar bridges into a trem'd Strat body. I got a reply from Ralph Ibarra, who says

". . . we are very familiar with what it takes to put (our bridges) into trem-routed bodies. We are able to install a 2TEK in a trem-routed body without the need for first filling that portion of the routed cavity that is through the body."

Here is a link to the bridge.

http://www.the2tek.com/data/inspect.asp?Item=3&Category=All&Filter=Guitar%20Products
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,635
if you want the tone of a hardtail (warmer bridge pickup, less chime on the neck pickup due to the absence of a steel block), then buy a hardtail, or at least a hardtail body.

if you want just the performance, set the bridge flat on the body, put more springs in it, get on with your day. I've never seen any purpose for shoving wood blocks into a bridge that will lock down just fine without them.
 




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