Anyone Not Like the EH Memory Man?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by drspencer, Feb 19, 2006.

  1. drspencer

    drspencer Member

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    I just scored a used MM, which I've heard nothing but good things about. Anyone not care for this pedal?
    Thanks
     
  2. eric-d

    eric-d Member

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    I loved mine when I had it about 5 years ago... It was one without the wallwart and TB... It was great, but I was dumb and sold it for a DL4. I want one back, I just wish it was smaller.
     
  3. TieDyedDevil

    TieDyedDevil Member

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    There are a lot of things I like about the DMM. The one thing I don't like (and the reason for selling mine) is the compandor thump that accompanies note attack.
     
  4. drspencer

    drspencer Member

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    Is this the 'clicking' sound I hear whenever I strike a note?
    It almost sounds like the effect is being 'switched on' everytime you pick a note.
     
  5. indytone

    indytone Member

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    I have one with the built-in cord and have never noticed any clicking or anything like that. Make sure you don't have the Level up too high. The only thing I don't like about the pedal is that it takes up so much space.

    Great sound though.
     
  6. drolling

    drolling Member

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    Compandor thump? What's that?

    Whatever it is, mine doesn't do it, but it's an old one w/AC cord.

    The only thing I'm not crazy about on these old buffered boxes (new ones are true-bypass) is the fact that it's practically impossible to determine unity gain. The passive guitar signal's converted to a really hot line level, kinda sounds like a solid-state preamp. Very loud, but great if you use weak, underwound single coils screwed way down close to the pickguard (my most excellent tone secret revealed!). I've heard they overload real easy if you use high output humbuckers.
     
  7. theanalogfuture

    theanalogfuture Member

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    I've got a pretty new one, (true bypass version) I absolutley love it.

    I do wish, however, that it could do longer delay times. I love long, whacked out, Nick Zinner, Sigur Ros delays.

    This is why I am in the long bathroom at the ballpark line for an echoczar.
     
  8. arexjay

    arexjay Member

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    Go for an echoczar!!!


    And don't worry about the Memory Man, I'll take good care of it for you! ;)
     
  9. Enjoyer

    Enjoyer Member

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    I have a 4 or 5 year old unit with the AC cord that I purchased from Analogman with the true bypass mod that he offered at the time. As I have said elsewhere on this forum, when she is good, she is very good. BUT, I can not afford to gig with her due to the feedback generated at inexplicable, random times due to the sensitivity of the Level. Yes, I too, experience the "compandor thump that accompanies note attack".
    This pedal is 70% THERE! It is the 30% that would prevent me from recommending it and/or using it in a live setting.
    After posting my problems previously on the Analogman forum, I was contacted by Analogman and the designer. Analogman referred me to the designer for mods and adjustments. The designer (whom I believe to be a very gracious and stand-up guy) contacted me, based on an e-mail he received from Mike, offering to do the mods and adjustments to make it right. BUT, at a significant cost, I might add.
    I did not follow through, as my thought was, "Why weren't these problems addressed in the first place." I will look elsewhere. Lo and behold, some interesting analog delay pedals began to appear on the market after a very long drought. By the time I invested in all of these "fixes", I would be close to the price of a Memory Lane or even an Echoczar. I opted for the latter. (and I wait - considering buying a Memory Lane for use in the next 6 to 9 months). I use an Aquapuss or a Maxon regularly. I will still record with the DMM, however, because I can go back an re-record if the dreaded HUMMMMMMMM kicks in or the thumps destroy the track.

    Please don't misinterpret what I have written. The DMM has all the potential of being a truly great analog delay pedal. It set the standard. The inclusion of the modulation (albeit, without a lot of control - but wait, there is a mod for that!!) is a fantastic thing. The delay is warm and smooth. I do love this pedal when it doesn't show its weaknesses. She is a beautiful date who always seems to fart when meeting your parents.
     
  10. TieDyedDevil

    TieDyedDevil Member

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    That's it.

    It's not pick attack, but it follows the pick attack.
     
  11. threm

    threm Member

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    I have no plans of selling my two DMM. They have not been replaceable so far for certain modulated delayed sounds when playing (semi)clean.

    Still, I`ve had no success with the DMM on distorted and fuzz sounds in opposite to the MemLane and Echoczar.
    The DMM gets muddy (not just the delayed sound but the whole picture) with too much of a reverby sound added. A friend of mine with a DMM into a Budda amp likes his DMM also when playing with lots of gain.

    When playing with fuzz the DMM is like a messy stew whereas the Echoczar sounds more like dinner served on three plates and the smell of dessert hangin` in the air. The Echoczar manage to keep a defined front with layers of delay behind.
    MemLane also has this ability, but more like a dinner served on two plates, dessert might be included.............. if the chef has a good day. :)
     
  12. BrentSP

    BrentSP Member

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    LMAO.....this is cracking me up......I love it. To be honest this is very helpful indeed. I wish I hadn't of bought the DMM now :(
     
  13. Howard Davis

    Howard Davis Member

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    MEMORY MAN MODS:

    DELAY TIME INCREASE MOD
    The Deluxe Memory Man was designed for a 550 msec. maximum delay. Some units, due to component tolerances and other manufacturing problems, do not have this long a delay time. A mod can be done that corrects this condition.

    TOTAL BYPASS MOD
    Most Memory Man pedals have an adjustable gain stage (drive level control) that introduces complications with total bypassing. This is because with total bypass, this variable gain can result in a volume mismatch between the dry (bypass) and effect-on signals when the footswitch is thrown. The level control can be set so the dry and effect-on volumes are equal, but this level setting may not be optimum for signal to noise ratio, which requires as high a drive level as possible without causing objectionable distortion - unless such distortion is desired. So you CAN have a total bypass mod done on such a Memory Man, but you then lose the ability to adjust the drive level exactly as you might want it and also keep the balance between bypass and effect-on volume levels.

    HOT PICKUP MOD
    The reissue Deluxe Memory Man now comes from the factory with direct bypass, but with the input level control stage as it was originally when wired for buffered bypass. This is workable with many pickups, but a bypass/effect-on level matching problem - effect overdrive distortion at too low a level - can occur with hot pickups. This modification corrects this.

    INPUT IMPEDANCE INCREASE MOD
    Where total bypassing is not desired, a mod that increases the input impedance of the first stage can be almost as effective as total bypassing in eliminating tonal degradation due to pickup loading. If you use other pedals or long cables following the Memory Man, increasing the input impedance is preferable to total bypassing, as the benefits of buffering by the input stage are retained.

    LED EFFECT-ON INDICATOR MOD
    An LED can be added to indicate when the effect mode is activated.

    WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE? MOD
    Tell me your idea. If it can be done, I'll do it! Contact me: howard.davis2@att.net

    NEED AN ALIGNMENT?
    Electronic products containing analog delay ICs have internal trimpots for adjustment by a technician. For proper operation these must be correctly set, and this is done at the factory. In time - especially with the rough handling that guitar pedals are often subject to - these trimpots can become misadjusted, resulting in distortion, excessive noise, improper operation, or no operation at all.
    It is impossible to correctly adjust all the trimpots - called "doing an alignment" - without using lab equipment and the proper procedure. An audio oscillator, oscilloscope, and the test and alignment procedure for that particular pedal are required, as well as technical training and experience. Attempting an alignment without these usually just makes the problem worse - and more costly for a technician to fix.
    The most common symptom indicating a need for alignment in the Memory Man is overdrive distortion occuring at too low a signal level. Clock noise, a high-pitched sound heard at long delay settings, is another symptom.

    If interested in repairs or mods, please contact me at howard.davis2@att.net

    Howard Davis, EE - designer of the Memory Man series for EH :RoCkIn
     
  14. rwe333

    rwe333 Supporting Member

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    Awesome, Howard!
     
  15. capnbringdown

    capnbringdown Member

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    Yeah, I had one for a short time, but the delay time wasn't long enough for me, so it had to go. I couldn't run anything before it (bad for a delay) or use my hb guitar. It also seemed to have a really annoying, high-pitched whine when on, like when an old tv is turned on. That was the most annoying thing about it. That ****ing noise nearly drove me insane, so I had to get rid of it.
     
  16. eknapier

    eknapier Member

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    I had the leslie and hot pickup/impedence increase mods done to my Memory Man from Mr. Howard Davis. I love it, the leslie sounds so much better to my ears in the modulation section than the chorus - but now I have both and a speed control taboot. The clicking seems to result more from humbuckers or hot inputs (large volume boosts, etc.) into it in general, Howard can explain more in detail why this is an issue, maybe you should contact him. The hot pickup/impedence increase mods have definately helped considerably, but I still have to watch the level going into it, or it will distort. I definately have more headroom however. I mainly use Humbuckers, and howard told me if I increased the impedence any more the unit may not sound good w/ single coils so hey....

    My big question, that I've never quite been answered - is this headroom issue a Memory man thing, or is this an issue w/ analog delays in general? I remember hearing about a Keeley delay being developed that the more you push it w/ volume and gain, the fatter the delay tone is. But I've not even really heard talk of a prototype....

    Anyway, I've finally got my setup right where this is not an issue any longer. I have my Timmy before the memory man to smooth and level things out before it hits my memory man. No matter how much I boost before the timmy for more gain, I seem to be able to get a clean sound from the memory man - the TImmy works wonders for me in this respect, acting as a preamp sort of and just smoothing everything out and of course adding its trademark sparkle and fatness. Then I add additional boosts after the memory man for general volume boosts if necessary.

    I love the sound of the memory man, i love how you can control the blend and feedback knobs easily w/ your feet (if you turn it sideways on your board), and the leslie modulation is just killer sounding - you can't really get the pedal to do straight leslie emulation, imo, as the shortest delay time on the pedal is still a little too long for short staccato lines, you definately hear a slight delay. So I use my DLS for straight leslie tones. But man, what Howard does to the modulation on the delayed signal is such a beautiful thing. I pretty much have my memory man all the time: to expand/add depth to my solos, add a little modulation for chordal work, reverb when needed, and sometimes w/ the blend down as just a nice low pass filter - and I can pass all these settings rolling the knobs w/ my feet (I have all the settings marked, so flexible).

    Anyway, it's a killer classic pedal - for the record I have not tried the most talked about and raved about echoczars or diamond memory lanes. I'm almost scared to (lol) - my motto is totally becoming, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." W/ Howard's mods it's definately not broke, it's pure magical analog delay heaven. Thanks again man! Great work!
     
  17. teddy boy

    teddy boy Member

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    eknapier,

    Have you got a pic of that Memory man? I'd really like to see it.
     
  18. eknapier

    eknapier Member

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    I don't have a pic, I'm sorry. BUT - if you're wondering what the modifications "look" like on the pedal - the speed knob is a smaller knob that is installed between the Delay Time and Modulation knobs, aligned slightly above both of them.

    The modulation knob on the stock memory man is for depth/intensity of the chorus vibrato only - the switch at the top that toggles between chorus and vibrato is actually two different speed settings for the same chorus/vibrato effect. SO stock modulation offers one effect w/ two speed ranges via toggle. What Howard does is add a new modulation effect which is a leslie or rotary effect, that sounds similar to the other effect but less pitch bending and more rotor sounding if that makes sense, much more pleasing, imo. The toggle switch now chooses between either stock chorus/vibrato or the new leslie/rotary effect. If the toggle is set to chorus/vibrato, you can now use the speed knob to get to the two previous stock preset speeds the toggle used to switch between, and all points in between and even slower and faster if you want.

    Hopefully that sort of paints a picture in your mind of what it looks like.
     
  19. drspencer

    drspencer Member

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    Does anyone have clips of Howard's mods?
    Thanks
     
  20. Howard Davis

    Howard Davis Member

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    A trimpot alignment would've fixed the "clock noise," and the delay time can be extended roughly 25%

    Guitar pedal design engineering, repairs, and custom mods:
    http://howard.davis2.home.att.net/
     

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