Appeal for a little help with simple John Fogarty Solo

charles28722

Member
Messages
33
I"ve been playing a little CCR and Fogarty stuff recently and am trying to figure out the solo on John Fogarty 'Don't You Wish it Was True':

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JiQIisyncY0
Solo starts at 2:40 and repeats at end of song.

It's a simple 4 chord melody with a simple but very appealing solo. I've watched a few videos and can't make out what's going on, probably because it is beyond my very modest experience. If you have nothing better to do I'd love some help with a video, tabs or anything.

Be gentle. Don't laugh.
 

JonR

Member
Messages
15,160
It's the old Keef Richard chord riff, basically.
In CAGED langage, it's a "G" shape for the E chord on strings 4-3-2 strings (index barre), with a "C" shape for the A added on and off.

A...E...E
---------------
-10-9--9------------
-9--9--9----------
-11-9--9-----------
---------------
---------------

Then coming down something like this:
-----------------
-9--7---5-----------
-9--8---6-----------
-9--9---7-----------
-----------------
-----------------

to a B-E resolution here:
-----------------------
--4-5--------------------
--4-4--------------------
--4-7--------------------
-----------------------
-----------------------
 

RLD

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,113
If that first Keef style riff that Jon tabbed out is new to you Charles, you'll find it's used in hundreds of songs and should open up a whole new world for you.
"Listen to the music" by the Doobies for one.
 

stevel

Member
Messages
14,942
Another CCR example is Proud Mary - it's got this similar barre (on 7th fret for a D chord) that alternates back and forth in various ways with the G shape (so everything 2 frets down from JonR's first example).

As RLD said you'll find them LOTS of places - another Doobies one is Long Train Runnin but in that case they add a lower note on the 4th string making it into a m7 chord.

That break in the middle of Life in the Fast Lane - there they are again.

Walk Away by the James Gang - check the intro. Similar is the main idea in Free's Alright Now.

And any Rolling Stones song...

The other ones (JonR's 2nd tabbed out example) are other basic triad forms that are really good to know on all your string sets!. Listen to the solo section of Bad Moon Rising and you'll hear these shapes alone or in combination (i.e. over 4 strings).

Really is one of the under-learned and under-appreciated aspects of "lead" playing IMHO.

Steve
 

charles28722

Member
Messages
33
Guys:

Your responses are tremendous and greatly appreciated. I've been playing a little over two years and this is indeed new to me. I will be working on this tonight.

Others - feel free to elaborate. This will all be put to use.

Warmest regards,

Charles
 

JonR

Member
Messages
15,160
And any Rolling Stones song...
These two for starters:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3B0Y3LUqr1Q
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SGyOaCXr8Lw
- Keith tunes to open G, so he can use a full barre, but you can use the same shapes on strings 4-3-2, if you mute the others.

....

BTW, don't confuse the official Start Me Up video with this...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L8CtWUY7nvg
:D
Really is one of the under-learned and under-appreciated aspects of "lead" playing IMHO.
Absolutely. It starts as a simple embellishment of the chords.
Eg, just strumming a G chord gets boring after a while. So, add an occasional E (string 4 fret 2) or C (string 2 fret 1) - or both - now and then, while still holding the G outline (strings 6 and 1 fret 3 - mute 5th)
Now you're improvising. Still playing rhythm, but in a way that can lead seamlessly into full lead playing, IF you know enough chord shapes to use as springboards.

3-string triad shapes form part of all the common guitar chords (any comfortable 3-string portion of the shape, essentially), and it's worth building up a thorough knowledge of them all over the neck.
 

stevel

Member
Messages
14,942
Charles, quick word of caution on CCR - Fogerty often would tune his guitar down a whole step but play in the same key as the others. So you hear a D chord, but he's playing an E shape which, on a tuned down guitar, sounds like a D. Because of this you may see conflicting tabs if you look it up - some people tab it out "where he played it" so a D chord sound would actually be that barre on the 9th fret, and other people tab it out "where it sounds" - which would put it on the 7th fret. So just keep that in mind as you're looking at their tabs - i.e. if you learn to play it but it sounds wrong, it's probably the "where he played it" version not the "where it sounds" version (aside from being just completely wrong, which internet tabs often are).

Same can happen to some degree with Keef - he was in open G a lot of times and people either aren't aware of this or intentionally arrange a part to be played in standard tuning. I've seen like a hundred videos on the intro to Honky Tonk Wimmins and I think I found only 1 that actually did it in open tuning and only 1 other that mentioned it was originally open and his was an arrangement for standard tuning.

On strings 2-3-4 this doesn't make too much of a difference for Keef but it sometimes makes for odd things on the other strings!

Steve
 




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