Archiving my recordings?

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by SideBMusic, Feb 8, 2015.

  1. SideBMusic

    SideBMusic Supporting Member

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    I want to remove some finished recordings from my iMac. Although I use Time Machine for backups, I am considering clearing the projects from the computer. I have an external hard drive I plan to copy them to. But is that enough? Should I burn copies to CD as well?

    What do the rest of you do to preserve and protect your finished recording projects?
     
  2. Nelson89

    Nelson89 Member

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    2 separate hard drives in case one of them crashes, some kind of cloud storage as well as a couple of CDs for mixed down material.
     
  3. geek-mo

    geek-mo Supporting Member

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    Magnetic hard drives have an archive life of 3-5 years, so bear that in mind. Fortunately, they are becoming less expensive and it's easy to transfer data to a newer drive.

    I read somewhere that Kodak made a CD with an archive life of 100 years, but I don't know if these are still on the market. I believe that Taiyo Yuden CDs, properly stored, will last for decades.
     
  4. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    I always write backup DVDs, at the end of every session, but that was in a commercial studio.

    I still write backups regularly, for stuff I do on my own.

    File management/archiving correctly is crucial, but you won't understand until you get bit in the ass. <g>
     
  5. 78deluxe

    78deluxe Member

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    Google "M-Disc"

    They make a special burner and disc that gives the 100 year lifespan.

    Yaiyo Yuden are nice discs, but they can go "bad" with proper storage just like any other dye based disc.
     
  6. Pietro

    Pietro 2-Voice Guitar Junkie and All-Around Awesome Guy

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    Data does not exist unless is it in 3 places, and at least one of those places needs to be in a different location than the other two.

    CD/DVD backups + Hard Drive backup imho...
     
  7. Digitalman

    Digitalman Member

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    I back up everything to 2 separate HDs.

    So a 1) Local copy. 2) HD backup at home 3) HD backup at my office. I'll replace the 4 year old 2TB HDs with new 5TB HDs this year.

    All of our music, movies and family photos and videos are on those too. You have to stay on top of it.
     
  8. pattste

    pattste Member

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    You have received good backup advice. The other thing you should keep in mind is that your DAW projects may not open years from now when you're using a different operating system / DAW / plugins / virtual instruments (even just different versions of the same). You should make sure to bounce all your virtual instrument tracks to audio. You should also bounce all tracks raw as well as with fx - all consolidated. Use WAV files as your archival format. This way you'll be able to revisit these songs down the road if you want to remix or remaster them. Disk space is cheap these days.
     
  9. SideBMusic

    SideBMusic Supporting Member

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    You bring up some very good points. I have had projects not work properly when opening with updated software.

    Can the archival files be AIF as well as WAV?
     
  10. pattste

    pattste Member

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    Yes, but WAV is more common and widely supported. The Producers and Engineers Wing of the Grammy has published a number of documents including some guidelines for delivery and archiving music projects:

    http://www.grammy.org/recording-academy/producers-and-engineers/guidelines
     

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