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Are 1970s strats desirable?

noisebloom

Member
Messages
1,481
One of my childhood friends has a 1974 Strat, bought brand new by his parents. It was his first serious guitar. He's had many other guitars over the years, including Strats--45 years later, the '74 is still his #1.
 

=JL=

Member
Messages
984
Mine has seen off a long-treasured '63, a few modern Strats and a few high class partscasters.
By all measurable standards it's a piece of crap, but it has a bit of magic about it and it's the one I've kept.

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Timmo

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,771
not to me.

good on you if you love them but I've seen enough up close to know I would never buy one online and I can get a plenty good old strat for less money by buying an SQ series one.

While I have talked about a really good '72 Strat I had back in the days I now have a KILLER "SQ" Strat that amazes me every time i take it off the wall.
I mean, the damned thing hangs in my studio/office and I actually forget how great it is sometimes. I paid $200 years ago for it and will keep it forever.
I NEVER have to tune it seems and I can imitate any Strat tone from anyone!
The SQ's are indeed killer!
 

haslar

Member
Messages
1,945
By far, the worst Strats I’ve played were 70s strats.
I’ve also played some good ones.
But I’ve never played a fantastic 70s Strat.
 

Jabby92

Member
Messages
3,967
They could be to some players. I don't like the giant headstock or the 2 string trees or the 3-bolt neck. Much prefer 50s or 60s style Stratocaster.
 

Mike9

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,979
I had a '79 Strat that weighed a ton I mean 10lbs+. Sold the body, kept the neck - RW veneer board, chunky profile, what's not to like. I removed the lower washer and converted it for four bolt for a MJT body I have. The pickups are somewhere around here and they measure pretty nice with a hot bridge. I personally like the big headstock they have more mass where it counts + I just like the look.
 

lost sailor

Member
Messages
405
Me and my '72 have been through hell and back. It never let me down, though there are issues like a broken tuner (I collided with a bass, bent the split shaft and one side broke off)- I can still put a string on it and tune it up. The 3 pos switch was oxidized and worn out, it needed to be replaced, and the pickups were all but dead. So I put 57/62's in it, changed to a 5 pos switch and replaced the output jack. Like anything that has been used for a long time, things wear out. I played it every day sometimes for 5 or 6 hours at a time. The neck is great, it was refretted about 40 years ago but still has some life. Neck stamp is "22 NOV 72". It replaced a stolen one in '78. It was my only guitar until 96 when I got a MIJ that I didn't like much. Yes it is a bit heavy but I will never sell it. In the summer if '78 I got it used from a college classmate for $250. Now I have 7 other Strats but this old friend will always be #1.
 
Messages
326
Even guitar players that are pragmatic by nature, have trouble being pragmatic about guitars. For some, nostalgia adds value. For someone that owns a 70's strat that they have a history with, and bonded with it's probably close to priceless. The prices some 70's strats are bringing are shocking to me. Asking price isn't always the same as what something will actually sell for, but some appear to be bringing good money.
 

Relicula

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,102
The desirable goes down when the prices go up.

Lets fast forward, upwards of 2k you can get a better sounding, more consistent, custom shop guitar.

The prices on 70's and even 80's strats are filling the void left between 50's and 60's strats.

If your a child of the 70's like me, 70's guitars were the first ones I was able to buy that was a real Fender

They are fraught with inconsistency, and chances of getting a good one are the lowest of all the choices one could make. And this is coming from a guy like me, that has been chasing the 70's strats forever. After years I kept one 79 as it had been beat to hell and played a lot. It has changed parts galore, weighs about as much as a soccer mom with 4 kids.
But I wont get rid of it, as it is the rare bird that has survived other great guitars. Mostly nostalgic reasons, but it plays and sounds remarkable in spite of being from this time period.

You may find one that hits all your hot buttons, but your search will be extensive, and nowadays, expensive.
 
Messages
23,963
They are fraught with inconsistency, and chances of getting a good one are the lowest of all the choices one could make.

I think so. I've played some of the 50s and 60s Strats that were being held for collector reasons and they can be just as far from being a solid player. I think some people are buying 70s and making excuses for them on the hope and assumption they'll be good investments.

And maybe they will. But production numbers for the 70s are so high, next to 1950s and early 60s. IMO there will ALWAYS be more prospective owners for available 50s and at least early 60s Strats, but there may come a time when available 70s Strats are too plentiful for the number of people willing to sacrifice to have one.
 

RLD

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,349
I have a 73 or 74. Original pups sound fantastic ala Billy Gibbons "Jesus just left Chicago".
Other than that it's unremarkable...lighter than my other more recent Strats and no RWRP so it got the buzz.
It's a great guitar, but so are my MIM's.
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Relicula

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,102
I bought my first real strat in 1976 it was 325.00, it certainly has appreciated in that time.

But any guitar as an investment is just as risky as any other form of investing.

My experience has been if you hold onto something long enough it will be worth more one day., maybe.

I sold a 71 Marshall head for 2300 I paid 750, it wasn't bought as an investment but it appreciated over the 15 years of me owning it.
 

Ayrton

Member
Messages
1,905
I didn't bother to read all nine pages, but it is possible to find a great '70's Strat. Consider weight, neck fit, and sound when looking, but just because it is old, doesn't make it great. I see prices for early '70's examples creeping past the $3-$4k mark, and I don't believe any example is worth that. You have greater odds of your average Road Worn Strat being a nicer sounding and playing instrument, so shop accordingly.
 

Dannyz

Member
Messages
2,465
I would consider an American Vintage 70s Strat instead of an original one from that era.

The AV70 is all the og wanted to be. Steel tremolo block, thiner poly finish, lightweight (around 8lbs), precise neck pocket fit.

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Beng2040

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,813
I would consider an American Vintage 70s Strat instead of an original one from that era.

The AV70 is all the og wanted to be. Steel tremolo block, thiner poly finish, lightweight (around 8lbs), precise neck pocket fit.

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I had one of these with a maple board. Great guitar, wish I still had it.

I went through a period of trying to find good 70's Fenders. I had a fantastic 78 Tele deluxe in blonde that I played for a decade and a couple of really good 70's thinline Teles. I never got lucky with any of the strats. Most were heavy with thick poly finishes and tiny frets. I do like the 70's pickups though and they'd probably sound great in a better made strat.
 




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