Are 64 Stratocaster's Worth More Than

JordanS0012

Gold Supporting Member
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113
It's a good thing Blackmore, Yngwie, and countless others didn't get hung up on the "ugly bullet truss rod".

Blackmore tore the place up on an Olympic White '74 just like mine, as well as others.

View attachment 584167

The Bullet truss rod is a pleasure to use, and so is the micro tilt.

Maybe this dislike stems from a deeper inner conflict, something more Freudian.

dont take it personally lol, ive bought 70s strats and just didnt care for them, the aversion doesnt run that deep, its not like my dislike of headless guitars has anything to do with castration (or maybe it does?).

more power to you, but if the bullet truss pleasures you as thoroughly as your comment suggests, you might be the one channeling Freud ;)
 

bluejaybill

Silver Supporting Member
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1,267
These narrow minded opinions are not gospel.

Leo invented the Micro Tilt 3 bolt neck. Fender makes it again on a variety of 70's inspired guitars without any problems.

There is nothing inherently wrong with a 3 bolt Strat.

The Poly finishes aren't that weird, just fine actually.

Here's my 7lb 10oz '74 with a better neck pocket than my AVRIW
While I'm glad you like this period of stratocaster, and I'm sure there are many good examples, I would say that these guitars are the reason vintage strats became valuable in the first place. It was universally thought at that time and through the years that the older ones were superior in terms of material, tones, paint, and playability. That is why they are worth more money, or I should say that that's why they became more valuable. The prices on them now are a different story, they have become collectables, so a whole different ballgame.
 
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1,553
Yep, 100% the crappy 70's made the 60's look very good indeed, but already by 1968, people were looking at vintage Strats pretty hard.

Gibson reissued the Les Paul in '68.

Vintage guitars were in.
 

Spider-Man

Silver Supporting Member
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6,216
I have a ‘74 Tele Custom. It’s a good guitar, but not necessary a great guitar. Very cool, but my ‘58 Esquire is a lot better.

Back on topic. I have a ‘64 Strat, green guard, clay dots, transition logo. A ‘65 with those specs is the same guitar. A white guard and pearloid dots move further into CBS land, and those are less desirable specs, but are completely cosmetic. It’s still the same guitar. For me, the F neck plate, F tuners, and big headstock are the clear markings of a CBS guitar.

In order of value, an early ‘64 with black bottom pickups and spaghetti logo would be the most valuable. Grey bottom pickups have their fans and may not bring down the price. But the transition logo, white guard and pearloid dots all bring down the value. You can occasionally find a ‘65 with spaghetti logo and all the other pre-CBS features, except black bottom pickups, but those pretty much go for the same price as a ‘64.

Like everything else, it comes down to the individual guitar. For me, where they drop off my radar is in mid-68 with the poly finishes.
 

Nonvintage

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1,356
How much less, all things would equivalent year Strats be. If one was a hardtail vs Whammy Strat? My guess would be a couple thousand.
 

Highnumbers

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2,252
It's a good thing Blackmore, Yngwie, and countless others didn't get hung up on the "ugly bullet truss rod".

Neither did Billy Corgan, who recorded basically the entire Smashing Pumpkins catalog (that mattered, anyway) with 70s 3-bolt Strats.

I still don’t like them, and I feel there is a distinct quality difference from 50s-60s era Fenders, but 70s Strats sure work fine for some people.
 

test123455676

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53
I've spent a bit of time with a '73 hardtail strat, and it was a fine instrument. I don't necessarily think the quality got worse, just the consistency of quality (if that makes any sense?) There are great guitars made at any time. Finding one from the late 70's is much more of a dice roll than buying a 50's/60's strat, but there are good ones out there.
 
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1,553
I got lucky when I found my '74. Obviously a good one when it was made, and struck me as a fantastic guitar the moment I got it in my hands. The neck pocket is well made. Loose neck pockets is what caused the shifting.
 

Spider-Man

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6,216
How much less, all things would equivalent year Strats be. If one was a hardtail vs Whammy Strat? My guess would be a couple thousand.

Hard-tail Strats seem to have increased in popularity recently. Not too long ago, the were definitely not as popular and you could get them for less than a tremolo equipped guitar. I can't say how much lower, because I was never interested in them and didn't track price differences, but they were definitely lower.
 

Radspin

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1,436
I worked in a music store in 1977 - 1978 and most of the Strats were terrible. Heavy, ugly thick finishes, mismatched grain on multi-piece bodies, loose neck pockets, weak pickups, cheap die-cast bridge, faint body contours. But there WERE some good ones. The early to mid 1970s Strats were much better overall. Teles and P-Basses didn’t suffer as much. Don’t think we sold a single new Jaguar or Jazzmaster while I was there, and not many Mustangs or other “student” Fenders. Jazz Basses were not as good as the older ones.
 

VaughnC

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My favorite Strat of all time was a '64 I once owned. It had a particular sound that was somewhat different other 60's Strats I've owned/played. And, in talking with others about Strats of that period, many felt that Fender just happened to get a nice batch of wood that accounted for that '64 sound. But who know's, sound is very subjective and you like what you like. But, so far, to me, the old '64 is the one to beat! Is a '64 worth more than other years?...would likely depend on the individual ears and the individual guitar in question. But I'd probably pay more for a guitar if I felt it had something special going on...but just not because it was a '64. Vintage or not, some guitars have "it" and some don't!
 
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guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
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24,434
It's a good thing Blackmore, Yngwie, and countless others didn't get hung up on the "ugly bullet truss rod".

Blackmore tore the place up on an Olympic White '74 just like mine, as well as others.

View attachment 584167

The Bullet truss rod is a pleasure to use, and so is the micro tilt.

Maybe this dislike stems from a deeper inner conflict, something more Freudian.
Darn you, you just made the price of those double!
 

JordanS0012

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
113
I'm attached to the early 70's era, so the guitars have huge nostalgic appeal to me.

Hey I'm all for dude! Like I said I love seeing people play 70s strats, its pretty rare but they always have a specific vibe and its just cool to see them in action. I am definitely not a hater of 70s strats, they are way more interesting to me then the AVRI stuff of the 80s or the weird roller bridges and lace sensors of the 90s. More power to you.

To comment on the actual thread, 65 strats have gone up a lot in value, they were always undervalued and the majority of them feel more pre-cbs than their later CBS counterparts. I like 62/63/64 the best and 65 strats are a little more all over the place in terms of feel. I've always wondered how Fender came up with their 65 carve because more than any other year 65 neck shapes seem to vary a lot in size.

Hardtails are really cool and it's a no brainer that they have gotten more expensive, they were also undervalued. A hardtail strat fulfills a specific niche and a few years ago you could get them for like 30% less than tremolos. On top of that they are rarer. Retrofret has a 62 hardtail they want 40k for, that is like the double the price of what they would've sold for pre pandemic.

Tonally you get something closer to a telecaster but you still have the strat's contours and pickup options.
 

59Jazzmaster

Member
Messages
692
I love 70s Strats. You gotta find a good one, but that is the case with most guitars. Massive amount of quack and punch and all that chewey character of a Strat combined with a more modern sound. It is the modern Strat sound, like a current Strat, with a helluva lot more Strat character, resonance, and heavy balls because of the weight.
 

YYZ

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,115
It's a good thing Blackmore, Yngwie, and countless others didn't get hung up on the "ugly bullet truss rod".

Blackmore tore the place up on an Olympic White '74 just like mine, as well as others.

View attachment 584167

The Bullet truss rod is a pleasure to use, and so is the micro tilt.

Maybe this dislike stems from a deeper inner conflict, something more Freudian.
That show before or after he landed on Plymouth Rock?
 




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