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Are any other guitarists as significant as Jimi and EVH?

marvin cobain

Member
Messages
1,778
Segovia
Django
Charlie Christian
George Van Eps
T-Bone Walker
Chuck Berry
BB King
Joao Gilberto
Wes Montgomery
Tony Iommi
Roger McGuinn
Paco De Lucia
Michael Hedges
Allan Holdsworth
The Edge
James Hetfield
Jeff Hanneman and Kerry King (for all the extreme metal after them)
Kevin Shields
 
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Messages
146
Eddie Lang. You may not listen to him but none of us would be here without him. He defined pyrotechnics on guitar and showed what it could do as a solo instrument using a pick. I'm still amazed at his speed and inventiveness, and he was doing it 100 years ago.

George Barnes. He was a huge proponent of electric guitar as a lead instrument, and doing it before anyone else. He was probably heard by more people based on the amount of studio work he did, but known by virtually no one. Hero to Les Paul & Chet Atkins.
two of the most criminally underrated guitarists ever
 

dreamspace

Member
Messages
963
For those saying neoclassical was invented by Randy or Yngwie, a certain Ritchie Blackmore may have a bone to pick with you about your lack of historical perspective.
Ritchie Blackmore and Uli Jon Roth certainly pioneered the sound.

I remember visiting a buddy, and there was this live solo on the stereo, and thinking to myself "Sounds like very early Yngwie, maybe some bootleg from his Steeler days, or maybe back in Sweden?"

Nope! It was Uli Roth, from some live record or bootleg from the late 70s.
 

Barquentine

Member
Messages
1,929
I started playing at age 16 in 1974. At that time all guitar players knew the basics of Chuck Berry's style. We could all play the intro to Johnny B. Goode. In my case, very badly. I didn't hear EVH until Beat It. I remember the first time I heard it I thought 'What the hell was that ?' The fallout from this was that EVERYONE started tapping. Any local band whether they were blues, soul, rock or reggae bands - come solo time the guitarist would unleash a flurry of tapping. I didn't jump on the bandwagon because there were just too many guys doing it but there's no denying that it was a real game changer.
 

Tootone

Member
Messages
5,582
I'm pretty sure this thread is not about you and who you like and who influenced you.

Its about guitarists that changed the landscape and totally altered industry wide perceptions on what a guitar and a great guitarist is capable of producing.

It requires you, to stop thinking about you, for a moment or two, and consider the bigger, very clear, picture.

Jimi was one.


Eddie was another.


Now think again.
 

patodruida

Member
Messages
89
This one is hard to assess. Some players have changed the landscape loudly (like Eddie and Jimi). Some have been less loud or have been forgotten.

A few scattered examples: I'd wager that 99% of this forum members owe something to Sister Rosetta Tharpe whether we know it or not; and while so much of what is now considered standard was pioneered by Chuck Berry, it would be a mistake to underestimate the effect Buddy Holly had when he held that space-ship looking contraption we call Strat on TV for the first time in history. Do you know why Gilmour and Knopfler played cherry red Strats?, because of Hank Marvin, that's why. Scotty Moore, 'nuff said. Johnny Marr is up there as far as I'm concerned but his appeal is more limited overseas; and I guess 90% of today's Youtube guitarists wouldn't know what to do if it weren't for Stevie Ray Vaughan (and, BTW, he was and is a legend, and shouldn't be blamed for the boring stevie-ray-vaughnabees).

I guess the things Eddie and Jimi had were massive charisma, appeal, and the ability to be at the right place and time. Just like the Beatles or Led Zeppelin.

Rankings suck. What matters to me is remembering that Eddie was a wonderful, manifold, beautifully troubled soul with a unique talent and whose playing touch millions. Everything else is just noise.
 
Messages
146
I'm pretty sure this thread is not about you and who you like and who influenced you.

Its about guitarists that changed the landscape and totally altered industry wide perceptions on what a guitar and a great guitarist is capable of producing.

It requires you, to stop thinking about you, for a moment or two, and consider the bigger, very clear, picture.

Jimi was one.


Eddie was another.


Now think again.
And there were many other equally significant ones...some of whom influenced both of them.
 

tostyj

Member
Messages
325
CC DeVille.
Oh man that reminds me of a story: I had a friend that worked at Guitar Center back in the day. He convinced me to compete in "Guitarmegeddon". I was of the mindset, and still am, that guitar competitions are stupid, but he said I would win free gear so I said what the hell. All the competitors had to fill out a sheet ahead of time and one of the questions was "who are your influences". I simply wrote CC DeVille and then forgot about it. I ended up winning Boston and the surrounding stores, so I moved onto regionals. They held the event at the House of Blues. When it was my turn, the MC of the event read off my sheet and said that my guitar hero was CC DeVille and everyone in the crowd started laughing. The judges however, did NOT think it was funny. I guess there were people from the hair metal industry among them, so they thought I was being a d**k; which I guess I was. Anyway, that was the end of my Guitarmegeddon run haha.
 

drifterphase

Member
Messages
818
The Edge. If the question is who has had influence on how people play guitar then it has to be David Evans. How many people are playing dotted eighth delays in the current era? More guitar players today sound like the Edge than either Hendrix or Van Halen.
 

WordMan

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,576
Hilarious that we are nine pages into a thread considering influence and, in doing a search, it appears no one has mentioned Jimmy “Chank” Nolen, who essentially invented Funk guitar.

Cold Sweat is generally seen as the first modern Funk song - this is Chank:

You can also go 40 seconds into The Payback and hear the most elemental funk guitar possible - that’s Jimmy, too. How many grooves have been influenced by this???
 

Robert Libutti

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,239
I think there can be significance in the sense of technical/historical achievement and then also in the sense of personal inspiration. For instance, EVH changed the world of heavy guitar. But I NEVER listen to Van Halen other than when it comes on the radio. I grew up in the 80s (sure I was 10 in 1990), but other than as a radio/MTV fixture, I never gave a second thought to EVH. But then someone like Justin or Dan Hawkins of the Darkness who are really just continuing the tradition of other classic rockers, just solid players writing good songs; they make me want to play. Tobias Forge/Cardinal Copia/Papa Emeritus IV, just writes good pop- heavy rock songs that make me want to play.

Influential in the historical sense, I could say Tony Iommi. Maybe not the most technical, but it seems through misc factors and sheet metal injuries, the dude changed hard rock guitar. I noodled on guitar, but when I started listening to Black Sabbath, it changed the way I thought about it.
 

mos6507

Member
Messages
232
There are guitarists who influenced other guitarists and there are guitarists who impacted listeners. The majority of virtuosos make music that most of the public don't really appreciate. Even someone like Steve Howe, sure, Yes had some hits, but prog itself is an acquired taste. And nobody besides other guitarists really listens to Jeff Beck, Vai, Satch, etc... And the Edge was only part of the larger textural guitar movement ala Andy Summers, Alex Lifeson, etc... Slash, yes, in a way, but he is more of a REVIVALIST as his style is more of a continuation of Page and Joe Perry than anything truly new. It's boring to cite the same old names, but that's WHY they come up. Purple Haze was a revelation. Stairway to Heaven. Eruption, Jump, Beat It.
 

Jon Silberman

10Q Jerry & Dickey
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
41,056
I can't - and won't - answer the question of which guitarists have been the most significant for the world.

I can - and will - answer which have been most significant for me, personally: Jerry Garcia and Dicky Betts.

There is a little Hendrix in my playing and no EVH. But it's impossible to hear me me play and not find Jerry and Dicky.

Of this I'm both humbled and proud.
 

Buzzard Luck

Member
Messages
2,257
There are plenty of guitar heroes that are important to many of us guitar players and music fans...Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, Zappa, Gilmour, SRV, Duane, Garcia...the list goes on and on. But have any of them really had the widespread impact that Jimi and EVH? Who else has been a gamechanger and completely shifted the understanding about what could be done on a guitar...and subsequently inspired thousands upon thousands of people to learn the instrument.

I'm having this debate today with some music friends.
Maybe missed it, did you define the term ‘significant’ as applied to the question? To whom? In what way?
Sorry, but this is not the kind of question that could elicit anything more than trite answers.
Hetfield, dude. Do you even know who Metheny is? Do you know what size crowds he’s played for? Holdsworth, personally. No Tempest ‘strangeher’ no __, IMO.
 
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