Are any reverb pedals analog?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by LesMesa, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. LesMesa

    LesMesa Member

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    I admit I know very little about how reverb and delay pedals work. I really like the MXR Carbon delay which I think claims to be analog so thought maybe I'd like an analog reverb pedal.

    I'm currently using a TC Hall of Fame and don't really love it. Thoughts or recommendations? Thanks
     
  2. 4nd3h

    4nd3h Member

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    There's the VanAmps ones that use real springs, and there's the vintage DOD FX45.

    That's about it. Check out the WET and the BSR and the RRR, though.
     
  3. Tsathoggua

    Tsathoggua Member

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  4. beautiful liar

    beautiful liar Member

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    does the dano spring king have a real spring inside? it's certainly big enough.
     
  5. jkokura

    jkokura Member

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    it might.

    Analog Reverb isn't really pedal friendly because by nature it requires 'space'.

    Jacob
     
  6. MiguelO

    MiguelO Member

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    +1 VanAmps Sole-Mate. I got the Sole-Mate Jr which is the exact same pedal but with the verb tank separate so u can place it under your board. it is an amazing pedal. If spring reverb is the sound you're looking for, I highly recommend it.
     
  7. mhuxtable

    mhuxtable Member

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    yeah the VanAmps with the springs and DOD made one that basically used a delay chip to make a very very short delay with long repeats creating "reverb"

    but really, 95% of reverb pedals are digital, you just need to find which one you like.
     
  8. BmoreTele

    BmoreTele Member

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    The Multivox Big Jam analog delay (se-7?) had a reverb setting.
     
  9. lux_interior

    lux_interior Member

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    It does, but I remember reading some time ago that there is a chip inside that introduces a digital delay (I am guessing slapback).
     
  10. td2243

    td2243 Member

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    You can't really fake room size with some digitizing or a spring. At least, not that I know of.
     
  11. lux_interior

    lux_interior Member

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    You've heard thousands of examples of this on records and movies.
     
  12. jeffg

    jeffg Member

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    The tech21 boost RVB is all analog I think...
     
  13. lux_interior

    lux_interior Member

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    Nope... it's a hybrid - analog+digital - although the site hints that it is all analog (without saying so).
     
  14. justnick

    justnick Gold Supporting Member

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    Yep, to date it's either a spring unit or digital as options.

    The only other ways that reverb has been successfully produced in a recording context is with plate units (BIG), or tanks/rooms. Obviously you can't fit either on a board.

    The problem is that emulating larger reverberant spaces (not a slap-back type echo or flutter echo) requires a huge number of repeats happening at once in a fairly non-linear or random relationship to each other. It's not practical to do this with analog delay lines based on BBD chips for instance. Probably wouldn't sound so great if you could.

    It's fascinating to me that the physics of a simple spring lend themselves so well to modeling reflections in a large space.

    This makes me wonder if there are ways one could use other electromechanical mechanisms to do the same in small space. For instance, could you make a tiny plate unit? Of course a small plate would not have the appropriate vibration modes of a large steel plate, but could one shift the frequency of the signal-with a digital or analog circuit-output by such small plate to compensate for its lack of mass? Would it sound cool?

    Or are there other structures similar in behavior to a spring but different in construction, that might offer different sounding emulations of space? Could they be smaller? What about a springy, flexible mesh with multiple transducers along each edge?

    Just wondering if anyone's messed with such things?

    n
     
  15. lux_interior

    lux_interior Member

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    The very first tape echo units were in fact not made to give a delayed sound as we know it today, but to reproduce natural reverb. Actually, the multihead echoes were deliberately made for reverb purposes, and had knobs with similar names ("reverb tone", "reverb duration" etc). Probably the first patent for a so called "artificial reverb effect" was filed in June 15th, 1950 in the US (I know that because I have it on pdf!!). I have such a multihead tape echo-reverb, the Klemt Echolette NG51, and it is the sweetest reverb I have ever heard - incredibly versatile, too. So it definitely can be done in an analog way without using plates or springs. Another proof is that some analog delays with dark repeats can be dialed to give the well known "reverb-y" sound, either long (big space) or slapback (very small room). Besides, reverb is actual delay since repeats shorter than about 35msec apart are interpreted by the human brain as reverb.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2012
  16. whoismarykelly

    whoismarykelly Oh look! This is a thing I can change!

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    Morley made the rock n verb which was a very short delay using an mn3011 which was specifically designed for early analog reverb simulation. It sounded pretty bad. Very tinny but somewhat spring flavored. If you ran maybe 3 analog delays in parallel with long repeats and low mix you could simulate reverb a bit better maybe.
     
  17. 4nd3h

    4nd3h Member

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    But, like, why? What's wrong with digital 'verb?
     
  18. justnick

    justnick Gold Supporting Member

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    Yes, as noted SMALL reverberant spaces with highly reflective surfaces can be emulated well with one or a couple delay lines. That's not what I was referring to. The problem is LARGE spaces.
     
  19. lux_interior

    lux_interior Member

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    Yes, I was also talking about large spaces (not necessary to use caps).
     
  20. justnick

    justnick Gold Supporting Member

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    Yep, sorry, caps just for emphasis not irritation.

    Yeah, I can get some sort of reverb-ish sounds with the CB Montavillian set to very dark repeats, but those sounds definitely are distinguishable from the more diffuse reflections modeled by a reverb. Anyway, the two phenomena often overlap in the "real (acoustic) world," but it's interesting to think about what makes them different.

    n
     

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