Are musicians better language learners ?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by rh, Feb 18, 2015.

  1. rh

    rh Robo Sapien Noise Maker Gold Supporting Member

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  2. GCDEF

    GCDEF Supporting Member

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    I doubt it. Most musicians I know struggle with English.
     
  3. rh

    rh Robo Sapien Noise Maker Gold Supporting Member

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    Well, the study does mention that the ones that obtained the benefit started playing before the age of 7.
     
  4. Flyin' Brian

    Flyin' Brian Member

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    If the grammar and spelling of many TGP members is any indication, most started playing music well after age 7.
     
  5. mcknigs

    mcknigs Supporting Member

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    My college Spanish teacher said she thought musicians learn languages more easily because they're used to listening closely and imitating. It's a theory...
     
  6. djdrdave

    djdrdave Member

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    Good post. I've always thought my language learning ability was improved by music as well. Especially the Asian languages, they have alot of different tonalities.

    Somewhere i read that native speakers of Asian languages were more likely to have perfect pitch.
     
  7. Flyin' Brian

    Flyin' Brian Member

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    Many teachers report that music students do much better than average at math as well.
     
  8. greggorypeccary

    greggorypeccary Member

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    Learning music does all sorts of good things for the brain, especially in the connection of different parts.

    Yet there are those who see the arts as "extra" things that can be cut from schools. :FM
     
  9. DetSlicker

    DetSlicker Member

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    I remember hearing years back that playing an instrument, juggling, etc., would help the more analytical side of the brain. That was before the internet so who knows if it's true.
     
  10. Flogger59

    Flogger59 Member

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    My wife the ESL teacher agrees. I can get the sound of a word in a new language a lot quicker than she can.
     
  11. gkoelling

    gkoelling Member

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    I kant beleev yu feal that wae!

    I ugree...won plus won is too!
     
  12. NicDo

    NicDo Member

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    I think that there is a connection- or some overlap with parts of the brain.
    Working from the opposite end- some foreign languages predispose the speakers to be better musicians even more so.

    Tone languages like Mandarin have words with multiple meanings drastically different based on the pitch they are spoken in.
    Mother and Horse are the same word, with a different pitch and a slightly different inflection which is never misheard or misunderstood by a fluent speaker.

    You can see how this trains toddlers to recognize pitch and give a learned advantage to young virtuosity, but this is connected to tone languages.
     
  13. Madsen

    Madsen Member

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    not in my experience. i'd second the 'most musicians barely grasp their native tongue' position. ;)

    the best language learners i've met were a couple Swiss girls. they spoke english, spanish, french, german, dutch, portuguese & who knows what else. they were teaching each other vocabulary in languages one was stronger than the other in all day long. it was amazing to hear. both were musically inept.
     
  14. Peteyvee

    Peteyvee Premium Platinum Member

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    I've been playing musical instruments since I was 4, first took lessons at 6 and I can say hello, goodbye, please, thank you, yes and no and swear like a sailor in at least 12 or 14 different languages. Then again, the only ones that I know more than a few words of and can read are Spanish, Greek, Russian and of course, English. Does that count?
     
  15. mrmurph

    mrmurph Member

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    In my case, I think it's more of an ability to speak with a more convincing accent as opposed to actually knowing the language better. I believe it has something to do with the way we hear things. The way words are supposed to sound. It amazes me that my wife, for example, having spent literally months in Spanish-speaking countries (cumulatively) will see the word "gracias" and pronounce it "gray-sias" or something like that. She has to really think about the "rules of pronunciation" before she speaks, whereas I've always been able to mimic the pronunciation of the locals fairly easily when we travel. The downside to that is, they (wrongly) assume I'm more proficient in the language than I am, and they start speaking to me as if I'm fluent...and I'm NOT...just enough to get around and hold basic conversations.
     
  16. shane88

    shane88 Member

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    no wood say unusefull
     
  17. longshoes

    longshoes Member

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    :bow
     

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