Are newer PRS guitars the best they've ever made? What's your take?

stuco

Member
Messages
848
I don't mean to get off track but does anybody know why they don't make many (any?) 24 fret models with a hardtail bridge?
 

TheGuildedAge

Senior Member
Messages
13,059
Yes. Paul never stops his quest of perfection.

He really is like the Willy Wonka of guitar building. His attention to detail is simply amazing. He actually experiments with the width of the washers used under the tuners, to see how the tone changes.

His locking tuners and bridge design are amazing too. I can dive bomb on mine almost like a floyd.
 

Sean French

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
14,580
My first introduction to PRS was in '92.
I moved to Germany and joined an all original band. It was my first and only experience in a band with another guitar player.
He had a '86 and a '87 Custom.
I thought they were great. I've never dug 24 fret guitars so, I knew I'd never get one.
Well, in the late 90's before I moved back to the US, I got to play a McCarty.
Wow!
When I got back I kept a look out for a McCarty. I finally bought a '97.
 

Killcrop

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,367
I noticed you can get a late 80s PRS for 2500-3000 these days. Current models may be great but I don't know if I would rather have one over a vintage PRS for the same price.
 

Peralta

Member
Messages
201
I sense this is a touchy subject, but what is it about the big heels that make it such a no-go? I'm just curious because I never think about it and I don't visit PRS forums (I would buy too many). I had the first run of N-4's (hand-made) with the Stephen's cut-away as my main guitar for several years. So, I went from no heel at all, to a strat heel, to big PRS heel. Never had the smaller heel version of a PRS. Is it thumb position? I notice my thumb never goes into that area, heel or no heel, so its hard to feel one way or the other about it. Interested to hear a grounded opinion.

If this is going to result is some one busting out the popcorn smilie, forget I asked.

It's just bulky, it does throw off my thumb position and I just don't understand it. Aside from RIC putting a heel on their neck through guitars, I just don't get the change. It's inelegant on a top end instrument. I also find the cheap wraparound bridges offputting, YMMV.
 

Peralta

Member
Messages
201
C'mon Now.

heel.jpg
 

Mark Ray

The RockTrain
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
6,158
Low sales. That's been brought up before. They introduced the CU24 Stoptail quite a few years ago, just not a big seller.

Same as the CU22 Soapbar. The original run only produced around 550 guitars. Of the PRS guitars I have had to let go due to financial reasons, that is the one I would love to have back.
Anyone have any input on this?
 

ProfRhino

Member
Messages
10,714
C'mon Now.

heel.jpg

3929_diapo_6015.jpg


a0aa14ee0cd7feee21d08d4c7a065d2d.jpg


pretty sure Paul knows exactly what he's doing, and why the different models are built differently.
Bet it's got something to do with dead spots, resonance and these things.
And then, I've grown up with Gibsons and Fenders, so any PRS feels like an ergonomic masterpiece in comparison.
ymmv,
Rhino
 

RockDebris

Member
Messages
4,358
It's just bulky, it does throw off my thumb position and I just don't understand it. Aside from RIC putting a heel on their neck through guitars, I just don't get the change. It's inelegant on a top end instrument. I also find the cheap wraparound bridges offputting, YMMV.

I was wondering how much was the visual of it, because after asking, I looked at Les Pauls and Strats, comparing to big heel PRS, and they all taper off at about the same point. 15th fret. The PRS looks like a bigger heel because of the body design and pocket. So, the PRS big heel leaves you no better or worse off than those guitars for thumb position. But, like I said, I had a guitar no heel at all and I determined, just for myself, it wasn't an issue (or a benefit) either way. Thanks for your take.

There must be a technical reason though. I doubt Paul switched to this (and has stuck with it) in an arbitrary kind of way. Just to be mean or something.
 

thefyn

Member
Messages
675
I use a PRS and a Marshall. (And sometimes a LP and a Marshall). My PRS MC-58 has more high-end (i.e. less muffled than my 3 LPs).

Where the heck do you get your info from? Is Ed Roman's site still up?

It's common knowledge PRS are dark in general. Not exactly a huge claim. "Smooth".

Gloop covered. Rounded soft smooth wraparound saddles. Pickup placement...it's not an opinion. How much crap can you put on fretboards? Is it a competition?

Gibsons dominate PRS in the studio. You won't find racks of PRS guitars in the average studio. You will get racks of Gibsons and fenders. Way tighter. More bite. More chime plus they can do the smooth stuff if you roll off tone/volume etc on the neck. An SG has even more bite. No way can PRS do what that does. Limiting.

It's science. Not opinion. The further up the pickup goes the more wooly it gets. They use too much finish. They always have pretty thin caps which is like rubber wallpaper unless you pay insane amounts for a thick cap and specify something less gloopy as a finish.

IMO PRS users don't know what they are missing in terms clarity, chime, subtle shifts in overtones etc.

I get my information from owning the best PRS money can buy. Experience.

It's like a roller bridge. Kills your attack. Soft offshoot from string and saddle = no ping/sing. It's like using coated strings.

Only good for things like single coils or p90's IMO. But what do PRS do? Coil tap. Another tone downgrade. You never get the true snap of a single coil via a humbucker/tapped etc. so even when you put it in single coil mode it's got that slightly off underpowered humbucker tradeoff you get from coil taps/splits.

This is an example I did a few days ago of a wrap around and a p90. A proper p90. Not a muted noiseless tradeoff:



PRS should listen to me. The info I gave is worth consulting fees. Haha. Gibson made the MASSIVE error of employing guru Anderton (the guy who "ran" Harmony Central Forums) and they almost went under amid the Robo tuner gloopy finish farce. PRS would dominate Gibson with a few minor changes.
 
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BeardoCI

Member
Messages
1,097
A current production Custom 24 heel joint. Pretty much the same size as my 2014 SE, which isn't that far off my lead guitarist's late-80s Cu24.
custom24_2017_photo3.jpg


"Come on", indeed :facepalm
 

Braunzo

Member
Messages
7,122
It's common knowledge PRS are dark in general. Not exactly a huge claim. "Smooth".

Gloop covered. Rounded soft smooth wraparound saddles. Pickup placement...it's not an opinion. How much crap can you put on fretboards? Is it a competition?

Gibsons dominate PRS in the studio. You won't find racks of PRS guitars in the average studio. You will get racks of Gibsons and fenders. Way tighter. More bite. More chime plus they can do the smooth stuff if you roll off tone/volume etc on the neck. An SG has even more bite. No way can PRS do what that does. Limiting.

It's science. Not opinion. The further up the pickup goes the more wooly it gets. They use too much finish. They always have pretty thin caps which is like rubber wallpaper unless you pay insane amounts for a thick cap and specify something less gloopy as a finish.

IMO PRS users don't know what they are missing in terms clarity, chime, subtle shifts in overtones etc.

I get my information from owning the best PRS money can buy. Experience.

It's like a roller bridge. Kills your attack. Soft offshoot from string and saddle = no ping/sing. It's like using coated strings.

Only good for things like single coils or p90's IMO. But what do PRS do? Coil tap. Another tone downgrade. You never get the true snap of a single coil via a humbucker/tapped etc. so even when you put it in single coil mode it's got that slightly off underpowered humbucker tradeoff you get from coil taps/splits.

This is an example of a wrap around and a p90. A proper p90. Not a muted noiseless tradeoff:



PRS should listen to me. They would dominate Gibson with a few minor changes.
:rolleyes:
 

Peralta

Member
Messages
201
I have 3 LPs and 3 PRSs (all McCarty-based) --- It is much easier to get to the upper frets on the PRSs than the LPs. Are you related to Ed Roman by any chance?

P.S. Upper fret access on the PRSs is easier than on a Strat or Tele too.

Honestly, knock it off. Not everyone who has some design issues with PRS is the spawn of Ed Roman.
 

BeardoCI

Member
Messages
1,097
In answer to the OP - I think they are, overall. There's still stuff I'd change but I'd spend my money on a PRS 'Core' guitar way more readily now than at any other time.
 

JCM 800

Member
Messages
6,614
I have two PRS. Flawless from a fit and finish standpoint. If you can't make them sound good, I wouldn't look at the guitar first.

I do notice mine are a little more sensitive, truss rod wise, to my other two, but my other two are over 20 years old.

I've found that my PRS guitars are much more sensitive to truss rod adjustment than any other guitar brands I own. A tiny amount goes a long way. Not a bad thing just something I didn't know right away.
 

TheGuildedAge

Senior Member
Messages
13,059
I've found that my PRS guitars are much more sensitive to truss rod adjustment than any other guitar brands I own. A tiny amount goes a long way. Not a bad thing just something I didn't know right away.

I think my issue is even though our basement is finished, the temp and humidity fluctuates more, so mine move a lot.
 




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