Are strats supposed to be "jangly"/"buzzy" unplugged?

lifeson

Member
Messages
209
Yes Strats can be set up to have a beautifully musical jangle to them. They are buzzy only if set up that way, or the bridge sucks. Sproingy is how I describe the sound of a trem equipped Strat. An elastic metallic glassy ball of sound that has a specific bounce to it, and creates a great slinky and glassy liquid crunch that bites perfectly for rhythm cut as well as stinging and singing leads with overdrive.
I think Tokai should have named their strats Sproingy Sound, that extra o makes all the difference :)
 
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1,163
The only noise that sounds anything like buzzing on my strat is sometimes the trem bar rattling a bit. I simply move the bar and the rattling stops. On a another strat doing the same thing years ago, I ran a wrap of teflon tape around the bar where it inserts into the trem to tighten it up and that eliminated the noise. Worth checking out.
Just curious- do you have a spring in your screw in cavity? There should be one in there (they often get lost as lots of people don’t even know about them).

 

ChickenLover

Silver Supporting Member
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2,728
There is a huge magnitude difference between the vibration shock associated with hitting the guitar body and the tiny vibrations in the solid body wood that come from the strings. Puszyński (2014) showed that the pickup output signal from string vibration->body-vibration->pickup vibration (top recording) was vastly smaller than that induced by actual string vibrations over the pickup (bottom recording); and also much smaller than that induced by knocking on the guitar body. It is implausible that strings->body wood->pickup vibration is a meaningful contributor to pickup output.
So does this refute the notion that "the more the wood vibrates, the more it absorbs the string vibration, which is a negative to the tone and sustain"?
The long, thin, flexible, composite neck is vibrated much more readily by string vibrations than the solid body, at the neck's particular resonant modal frequencies. And that has been shown to be associated with string vibration losses at those frequencies.
This seems to support that notion, but for the neck and not the body. But now we're back to the acoustic properties affecting the electric tone.
 

Timtam

Member
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2,975
So does this refute the notion that "the more the wood vibrates, the more it absorbs the string vibration, which is a negative to the tone and sustain"?
....
This seems to support that notion, but for the neck and not the body. But now we're back to the acoustic properties affecting the electric tone.

The published scientific evidence from real guitars does not support the notion that the solid body vibrates to any significant extent. It does show that significant vibration at particular frequencies can sometimes occur in the neck and bridge.

The general notion that anything in the guitar's structure that is excited to vibrate by string vibrations represents losses from the strings is a reflection of the laws of physics; specifically the Conservation of Energy Law. That is, you need energy to cause something in the guitar's structure to vibrate at a particular frequency. If that energy comes from the strings' vibrations at that same frequency, then that energy is no longer present in the strings (so not seen by the pickups).

I wrote up-thread about the extent to which the acoustic sound is related to the electric sound, in only a limited way ...
www.thegearpage.net/board/index.php?threads/are-strats-supposed-to-be-jangly-buzzy-unplugged.2370483/post-34952895
 
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budg

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,699
I find my Strats are a bit buzzy unplugged with lower action. A lighter touch is required to prevent that from coming through your amp as strats are very touch sensitive guitars.
 

Strummerfan

Member
Messages
8,783
This sounds reasonable but I'm not convinced it is really the whole story. If I knock on my electric guitars, I can hear the knock thru the amp. So there is some sort of connection between the amp and the wood. And before anybody posts it, I've seen the video where the bridge and tuners are mounted to separate tables.

It also seems a little contradictory in that you start off with "isn't amplifying the acoustic sound" and then end with "more the wood vibrates...is a negative to tone and sustain".
I don't think it's a contradiction. The strings are mounted on the wood, via the bridge and nut. The more the wood absorbs the vibration the shorter the sustain. I'm not proposing that the woods resonance has absolutely zero effect on the amplified sound, I'm saying it's a very small one, unlikely to have a noticeable effect on the amplified sound.
 

Den

Gold Supporting Member
Gold Supporting Member
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2,098
Just curious- do you have a spring in your screw in cavity? There should be one in there (they often get lost as lots of people don’t even know about them).
Thank you for the suggestion. I'll have to check that out. It seems to be that the bar is just loose enough to wobble a bit in the hole in the trem. I had this same issue on an older strat. It's such a slight noise now and then, so it's not a significant problem. Thanks again!
 




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