Are there any good Clapton songs in a major key?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by coolhand78, May 26, 2015.

  1. coolhand78

    coolhand78 Supporting Member

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    just wondering if anyone can think of some good clapton songs that are in a major key, or that showcase him soloing over a major progression?
     
  2. Guinness Lad

    Guinness Lad Silver Supporting Member

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    He's a blues player so he plays pentatonic stuff over major and minor.
     
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  3. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Hard to think of Clapton tunes which aren't in a major key...

    ...but I think I know what you mean: using the major scale of the key, rather than minor pent or blues scale. IOW, soloing in non-blues style.

    Wonderful Tonight might be an example (it's not a blues, anyhow!). He does bend into the notes, but he's using the G major scale, resolving to chord tones.
     
  4. fr8_trane

    fr8_trane Member

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    lay down sally
    The solo in badge is heavy on the major 3rd. Its really a clinic on mixing maj and min pent.
    The chorus of why does love got to be so sad is a maj pent fest.
    The outro solos on layla are maj pent
     
  5. gennation

    gennation Member

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    The bridge/solo of Badge if I remember right. D-C-G...rutroh, just like SHA.
     
  6. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Major key sure, but he plays very much in blues style on it.
    More true to say it's major scale, with adjustments to fit the occasional chromatic chord. IOW, great example of a melodic solo using a complete scale but following chord tones.
     
  7. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Ha! ;)
    C-G-D-D, actually (SHA as D-C-G-G).
    I don't hear much "major" stuff going on in the solo. He's still playing as if it's a blues in D, with maybe some acknowledgement of chord tones (there's an E or two on the C chord, maybe a B on the G chord). If he pays F#s, they're bent up from F or E in normal blues style.
    A useful example to study, naturally - to see how he negotiates a definite mixolydian groove - but it's not really EC out of his blues comfort zone (if that's what the OP is after).
     
  8. Powderfinger

    Powderfinger Gold Supporting Member

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    Sunshine of Your Love solo has some major pentatonic going on.
     
  9. gennation

    gennation Member

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    You're right, it's been a long time but I knew those three chords were in there. And yes, it's still very bluesy.

    Probably the most major songs he's done that it still bluesy is Hideaway and Tribute to Elmore James. But they are still dominant based and not maj7 based.
     
  10. JonR

    JonR Member

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    He plays a short solo using G major scale here (from 4:03):

    He's doing plenty of blues-style bending, of course, but it's all resolved to the chord tones which (between them) spell out the G major scale.
     
  11. fr8_trane

    fr8_trane Member

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    Of course he plays it in a bluesy style - he's a blues guitarist. I think I understand what the OP is asking...namely most clapton songs feature the minor pentatonic and he wanted some examples where a major tonality is being used. I know this because I went through a similar process where one becomes proficient at minor blues noodling (because its WAY more prevalent in rock) and then when you get a song that requires playing a major pent its like you have two thumbs.

    FWIW the very first lick of the solo in Badge is a full step bend from C to D with 3 half step releases to the the maj 7th - C#/Db! He does a similar lick later in the solo bending from F to G then deliberately releasing to F#. I love that lick.
     
  12. Steve Hotra

    Steve Hotra Silver Supporting Member

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    How about Bell Bottom Blues?
     
  13. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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  14. sacakl

    sacakl Silver Supporting Member

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    The standard Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out that he plays seems pretty typical.
     
  15. Phletch

    Phletch Member

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    Let It Rain (the outro solo)
     
  16. HiddenCharms

    HiddenCharms Member

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    Why Does Love Got To Be So Sad? The first solo is the A minor pentatonic. The second solo is A major pentatonic (with a few additional notes) over an Amaj7/Dmaj7 progression. This is true for the live versions. If I remember correctly, I think it is in the key of B on the Layla album, which is probably due to speeding up the track.
     
  17. russ

    russ Supporting Member

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    'Let it Rain'
     
  18. JonR

    JonR Member

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    Right. Like countless other tunes of his (in major keys). ;)
    Exactly.
    Of course, maybe the OP misunderstands the issue - the question is not clearly phrased after all. I'm only guessing what he wanted.
    Taking his question literally, the answer is: just about every song he ever recorded fits the bill - "in a major key... soloing over a major progression." You name it, he's doing that. But I was guessing he didn't want Clapton's normal bluesy soloing. But then who knows? ;)
     
  19. Powderfinger

    Powderfinger Gold Supporting Member

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    Not near a guitar, but aren't solos in "White Room" major pentatonic?
     
  20. coolhand78

    coolhand78 Supporting Member

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    JonR as usual is bang on. I should have worded my question better, so sorry for the confusion. But yes what i was really looking for is examples of Clapton soloing but not in his usual minor/major pentatonic way...
    looking for something where he is out of his box a bit and leaning on the major stuff...

    an example of 2 types of things are his playing on "the edge of darkness" from the 24 nights disc, and also one of my favorite solo's of his of all time "do what you like" from blind faith, now i'm not sure if either of these are major but the idea is that they're not really the usual clapton 'style'... so any examples people can think of that fit this description?
     

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