Are younger players turning away from the Les Paul?

Are younger players turning away from the Les Paul?

  • Yes, its a dinosaur of the past

    Votes: 190 21.2%
  • No its still as popular as ever

    Votes: 267 29.8%
  • It might be losing its popularity

    Votes: 439 49.0%

  • Total voters
    896

steam boat

Member
Messages
1,396
Sigh. EJ is right. End of story. That boy covers a lotta ground with his Strat. Much as I love Pauls, they aren’t as much of a must-have as a Strat and a Tele. But I just gotta have one!
I’m with ya. I’m technically a strat guy but my LP is my favorite guitar. It’s also my best sounding. :dunno
 
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PRW

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1,878
Id love to see someone do an entire song picking at the bridge-verse, chorus, solo. Better yet, do a set that way o_O
Well given that I'm into Peter Buck style arpeggiated jangling leads, and one of the keys to getting that sound is picking close to the bridge, if I had a Les Paul I'd be doing that, along with squashing things to crap with my compressor which is by far the most important pedal on my board. Although I might very well be trying to pound a square peg into a round hole, but Marr jangled very nicely with his LP, including a '60 Standard as per a clip I shared somewhere in this gargantuan thread.
 
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Average Joe

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11,506
While I understand the head stock issue with Gibson, although I have never experienced a break in 63+ years of playing Gibson, it is just my personal opinion that this breakage thing gets passed around like the town whore and everyone starts believing that every Gibson has a breakage problem.

They don't. It is human error of some type.
A player drops the guitar in or out of it's case, it gets kicked over on stage by a band mate, it get swung around in a tight spot and the head stock hits something hard enough to break it, and a myriad of other situations, which may occur.

It can and does happen to other brands of guitars as well. If you personally feel that you are going to be playing in a situation where this may occur, surely, you wouldn't want to bring a guitar which may be inclined to break out to such a place.

OR!, find a Gibson with a maple neck, which is going to be a stronger wood then mahogany. Better yet, use some common sense and just take care. I bring my R9's out to any playing situation both indoors and out doors in cramped clubs, and large outdoor venues, and they come away with no problem.

If I, a broken down old crumudgeon can do it, then the stronger, more agile, more alert, younger players should have no problem doing it.

One other thing is why is it so many players complain about the comfort factor when playing some guitars? Are you buying the guitar you want for the sound and feel, or some other reason? I ask this because Tele players complain about the comfort factor.

SG players sometimes complain about neck dive, or that the neck extends too far out to the left, but these player manage to adapt to the guitars physical shapes. It's part of the guitar's makeup.

Of course these are only a couple of examples so ymmv. :)
I don't disagree, but it's worth pointing out that your own post show why you players might shun LPs and Gibsons.

You're right that most headstock breaks are down to accidents. But those things happen, especially if you gig. And when accidents do happen, Gibson's design is more prone to failure than say Fender's. I can see why young people who often aren't as affluent as those middle age and beyond, woud consider a design more prone to failure during accidents somwthing to worry about. And Gibson isn't helped by the old guard why clutch their pearls at solutions that other makers implement - volutes etc.
And yeah, a nice R9 might be too nice to gig in some places....the kind of places young musicians often find themselves.
And comfort factor is a factor for many people. Why should they put up with less comfort than the competitor's product offer, while sounding indistinguishable to all but the true trainspotter?

I love the sound and look of LPs. I can see why a lot of young people shop elsewhere
 

SFW

Member
Messages
1,392
The popularity of the Les Paul comes and goes. Slash was primarily responsible for the last resurgence in the 90s. I love both of my Les Pauls- a Standard and a Classic. They both play great. I also love my Strat and my Charvel Pro Mod. If a player comes along swinging a Les Paul that kids identify with, it will become popular again. That is the nature of things. I will say that Gibson has priced their way out of reach of most younger players. A brand new Gibson Les Paul Studio is $1499. A new MIM Fender strat with a humbucker in the bridge is $699. That's a significant jump for anyone on a budget. You can also pick up a Yamaha RevStar 620 for $699 and get into the LP tone territory (debatable I know). look at popular guitar music and that will dictate what kids are wanting.
 

sunking101

Member
Messages
1,304
Could young people ever afford a Les Paul? I started off with a budget Yamaha which I then sold to a mate and replaced with a Squier strat. Next up I traded that for a Les Paul copy. Then I got a MIM HSS strat. After that I got a MusicMan Axis copy, and in my early 30s I finally got a proper Gibson. If youngsters owning LPs is some kind of barometer to their popularity then they must have always been unpopular....
 

C-4

Member
Messages
13,402
I don't disagree, but it's worth pointing out that your own post show why you players might shun LPs and Gibsons.

You're right that most headstock breaks are down to accidents. But those things happen, especially if you gig. And when accidents do happen, Gibson's design is more prone to failure than say Fender's. I can see why young people who often aren't as affluent as those middle age and beyond, woud consider a design more prone to failure during accidents somwthing to worry about. And Gibson isn't helped by the old guard why clutch their pearls at solutions that other makers implement - volutes etc.
And yeah, a nice R9 might be too nice to gig in some places....the kind of places young musicians often find themselves.
And comfort factor is a factor for many people. Why should they put up with less comfort than the competitor's product offer, while sounding indistinguishable to all but the true trainspotter?

I love the sound and look of LPs. I can see why a lot of young people shop elsewhere

You make good points. :)
I can only make statements, based on my personal experiences, so your points are worth noting here.

When I started playing, the Strat was the only guitar which players felt was comfortable. I also like comfortable guitars. See my avatar. That guitar is my signature model from the company I was an endorsee of, but as with most things, it is possible to get used too, if not comfortable with, specific things if the sound and feel are preferred.

It's probably just that I have played Les Pauls along with arch top Gibsons for so many years, that after playing my Super 400 for 29 years, a Les Paul feels very comfortable to me. :)
 

Willicat

Member
Messages
365
I am a Gibson guy but....
How do you compete when companies like Schecter make super quality guitars that play and feel high end for under a grand? And they stay in tune with little to no TLC.
 

C-4

Member
Messages
13,402
I am a Gibson guy but....
How do you compete when companies like Schecter make super quality guitars that play and feel high end for under a grand? And they stay in tune with little to no TLC.

Have them made overseas, for openers. ;)
 

Willicat

Member
Messages
365
Agreed, but the thread is "are younger players turning away from the Les Paul.."
I definitely see more and more Schecters on stage at clubs then in years past with the young players. Especially the metal kids.
 

steam boat

Member
Messages
1,396
Well given that I'm into Peter Buck style arpeggiated jangling leads, and one of the keys to getting that sound is picking close to the bridge, if I had a Les Paul I'd be doing that, along with squashing things to crap with my compressor which is by far the most important pedal on my board. Although I might very well be trying to pound a square peg into a round hole, but Marr jangled very nicely with his LP, including a '60 Standard as per a clip I shared somewhere in this gargantuan thread.
The point is that a LP CAN thin out but not as easily as a strat. Conversely, a strat can thicken up very easily.

Again, it’s easier to thicken a tone than thin one out while still maintaining a good core sound. Per EJ.
 
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C-4

Member
Messages
13,402
I’m with ya. I’m technically a strat guy but my LP is my favorite guitar. It’s also my best sounding. :dunno

I play and have been playing the four basic food groups of guitars, but LP's are my favorite also.

One other point. I have no problem playing in tune all up and down the neck on my LP, and I have to use 7-30 gauge strings.

It's all in how you intonate the guitars, and they each have their own personality so intonating a Tele, for me anyway, is not the same as intonating a Gibson with 24.75" scale length, or a PRS.

Yes they all start out being intonated in a basic way, but with patience and precision they can be gotten tighter. :)
 

steam boat

Member
Messages
1,396
I play and have been playing the four basic food groups of guitars, but LP's are my favorite also.

One other point. I have no problem playing in tune all up and down the neck on my LP, and I have to use 7-30 gauge strings.

It's all in how you intonate the guitars, and they each have their own personality so intonating a Tele, for me anyway, is not the same as intonating a Gibson with 24.75" scale length, or a PRS.

Yes they all start out being intonated in a basic way, but with patience and precision they can be gotten tighter. :)
Absolutely!
I’m convinced that most of the LP hate comes from people with very little experience with them (especially a good one) OR they understand very little about guitars in general. Probably a little of both.
 

C-4

Member
Messages
13,402
Absolutely!
I’m convinced that most of the LP hate comes from people with very little experience with them (especially a good one) OR they understand very little about guitars in general. Probably a little of both.
Thank you very much for your wisdom, intelligence, and insight. I totally agree. :)

Stephen
 

oneblackened

Member
Messages
1,100
Yes and no.

A lot of younger players prefer something lighter with better ergonomics - a guitar that "gets out of your way" as it were. I'm one of those players. I can get "close enough" to an LP sound with something considerably less heavy and easier to play.

But, a fair number still do play them because they like the sound.
 

crazyboutguitars

Supporting Member
Messages
475
Id love to see someone do an entire song picking at the bridge-verse, chorus, solo. Better yet, do a set that way o_O
lol! I guess that would be a chore, but just doing a little chicken picking up there is okay. Just because it CAN be done doesn’t mean it’s a good alternative to a Tele. Teles rule! But I still love a good Les Paul.
 
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Resonate01

Member
Messages
1,283
I'm in my mid 20s and I don't know anyone close to my age with a Les Paul. Sure I see guys in their 30s and 40s with an LP, but younger dudes probably just can't swing the cash for one. Tons of great options in the 700-1200$ range used.

Especially when I see used LPs here in Canada for 3000$, get outta here...
 
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1,455
I'm 29
This is something I've been thinking about lately. Reading some forum posts out there and watching some of the younger players I've seen, I seem to get the impression that the LP isn't as popular as it was. I'm seeing a huge shift towards light weight Superstrats or double-cut style guitars and other shred machines and other modern guitars.

The main complaints I always read on the Les Paul is its too heavy, the fret access is bad or you can't shred on it or some combination of these factors. I find this to be a real shame because as a younger player, my LP is one of my best guitars in my collection. Nothing sounds like it and its so versatile for so many types of music. I love its simplicity and how it looks especially, they are like art pieces to me because of the carved maple and craftsmanship. Also mine isn't all that heavy to me, I mean is 8.9 pounds really too heavy?? I also can shred on it reasonably well and its a very easy playing guitar.

What do you all think? I added a poll.
I'm 29 and there isn't any other guitar for me, les paul sounds and feels like home....... Younger people just suck..... I can't even find anyone my age to jam out some classic rock tunes with...... People my age either wanna play some indie crap or technical metal...... Thank God for bands like rival sons bringing back the vibes of the best genre of music ever made......classic rock is the pinnicle...... And les Paul's are the best and most versatile guitar in my opinion, they can go from jazz to metal with no modification..... Strats can't teles can't and me and prs don't jive so that leaves good old Gibson........ Les Paul's are the best!
 




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