Area PUs & POT value related question

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by CarbonArc, Jun 28, 2008.

  1. CarbonArc

    CarbonArc Member

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    This will be an obvious question to many of you, but I don't know the answer and would appreciate some advice.

    I've followed past threads describing the PU characteristics with 500K vs 250K pots. My question pertains to behaviour when rolling back the guitar's volume.

    I'm using an Area 58/58/61 combination with a 500K vol pot. The high-end roll-off that occurs when I back off the volume seems excessive.

    My question (finally) - would the high-end roll-off be less extreme if I was using a 250K pot?

    I understand that the overall sound would be different with 250K vs 500K. It's the degree of roll-off when backing off that I'm asking about. TIA
     
  2. RvChevron

    RvChevron Member

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    With 250K there will still be still some high end roll offs, but not as much as 500K. That's just the natural of high impedence load.

    You can always add a treble bleed/high pass network to the pot to retain highs when turned down.

    Try some 180pf, 680pf or 1000pf, solder the two feet across the hot and output lugs of the pot.
     
  3. CarbonArc

    CarbonArc Member

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    Thanks RvC - I was hoping that was the case
     
  4. jamison162

    jamison162 Supporting Member

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    It takes a cap and resistor to create a high pass filter. But, I am not a fan of them at all. Why? Because it let's ALL frequencies pass through that are higher than the designed frequency. That includes some nasties that normally are passed to ground naturally.

    Try moving the whole tone circuit. It should be connected to the volume pot leg that your input signal from the switch comes in on (standard wiring). Move it to the leg of your volume pot that your output jack is connected to. This will help you retain highs naturally as you roll down the volume. It's essential the same scheme as the 50's wiring for a LP.
     
  5. RvChevron

    RvChevron Member

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    Just a cap is all it takes to make a high pass circuit.

    People add a resistor to either governs the amount of treble bleed or if in series, changes the taper of the pot to smooth out the treble bleed.

    If it sounds too bright and nasty, try out smaller value like 180pf instead of 1000pf/.001uf.
     

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