Artists who have done great albums late in their career

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by jcs, Jun 4, 2016.

  1. LaceSensor1

    LaceSensor1 Member

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    Project Z -- Jimmy Herring/ ft. Derek Trucks

    DMB has continued to crank out great albums even late into their career and with a missing member
     
  2. guitarz1972

    guitarz1972 Member

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    Loretta Lynn Van Lear Rose, excellent.
     
  3. old crow

    old crow Member

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    Lucindas down where the spirit meets the bone sure was great and so is her latest, Ghosts of HighwY 20.
    Have a listen to Dust or Faith and Grace , with Bill Frisell .
    I sure would like to hear her do an album w Daniel Lanois producing...
     
  4. Jimi1983

    Jimi1983 Member

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    George Harrison - Brainwashed
    Robin Trower - The Playful Heart
    Michael Hedges - Taproot
    Gary Moore - Bad for You Baby
    David Gilmour - On an Island
    Kansas - Somewhere to Elsewhere
     
  5. slybird

    slybird Member

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    Some of my thoughts: Maybe it's partly economic and partly a desire for career changes. Most people change careers at least twice, very few continue to do the same thing for their entire life.

    Let us suppose you wrote a hit record. You can A) continue producing knowing that you might never be the hit factory you once were, just keep doing it for the fun of it and break even on smaller stages. B) Quit and never have to face the letdown that you were just a lucky person with a pretty face and you will never have the number of fans you once had ever again and doing it without label support is not something you desire.

    Or maybe you never had a hit record. You just earned enough to pay the bills, more fame than money. There are many bands like that. It was fun in your 20s and 30s, but now that you are almost 40 you have to face the reality that your fan base may not stick with you as you age. Career changes can be hard for anyone to make after a certain age.

    If you did stick with it after you turn 40 then you have put yourself in a position of can't fail. It's kind of like going all in. Those that are still at it later in life are probably the gamblers that actually had talent.
     
  6. MikeVB

    MikeVB Supporting Member

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    I don't disagree, but I was thinking more about the guys that are still touring in their 50s - 70s. A few of them come out with some decent new material along and along, and some guys the new stuff's just bleh. Tom Petty and the Doobie Bros are examples of the former and latter, respectively.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2016
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  7. Custom Deluxe

    Custom Deluxe Member

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    I agree. Love all Dylan, but the first time I heard Time Out Of Mind, I was blown away.
     
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  8. slybird

    slybird Member

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    Maybe Petty has something to say and the Doobie Bros are playing it safe.

    Maybe we are most creative when we are new at the artform. We don't know what the rules are so we do exactly what we want without worrying about if it is right or wrong. These early experimentations build a fan base that is hungry for new sounds. After the artist has us we place expectations on our artists.

    An established artist risks losing their audience if they step too far out of the sound they made their career on. This would have a stifling effect on output. They are also not as hungry and have less an incentive to try topping their career building material.


    I don't think it is just musicians that have this issue. I think writers, artists, poets, programmers, startup founders, and probably video game designers have this age/creativity issue haunting their careers.

    I think an creative types need to take chances and be willing to risk losing their audience for the new/next thing. Some will win and some will lose. We can't all be a Steve Jobs consistently producing home run product until we die, some will produce the Amega instead.
     
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  9. zztomato

    zztomato Supporting Member

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    Robbie Robertson's post Band efforts have been great.
    Willie Nelson's stuff is still great.
    Dylan is at the top of his game.
    Guitar slingers like Clapton, Beck, Tommy Emmanuel are doing great work- fingers still flying over the fretboard.

    Then there's a long list of jazz greats that are just better with age it seems.

    I don't find it surprising at all, given opportunity, that our elder statesmen in the music business are still capable of greatness. It's the listener that needs to pay attention and keep up with what's being created. Typically, a musician's output tends to get more subtle and nuanced as they mature. It's sometimes maligned by a younger audience -or merely overlooked- due to the lack of bombast and sexual energy of a younger musician's material.
     
  10. jefesq

    jefesq Gold Supporting Member

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    Ghosts on Highway 20, pretty good too. The guitars alone make it worth listening to.
     
  11. Brooks

    Brooks Member

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  12. RoryGfan

    RoryGfan Silver Supporting Member

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    I apologize in advance if I missed this, but the Highwaymen are worthy, both as individual members and as a group. Perhaps the first country "supergroup." When every member is a great writer and great performer, it is difficult for them to be less than a huge draw.
     
  13. FenderBigot

    FenderBigot Supporting Member

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    Clapton was 44 when he released Journeyman, so was George Harrison when he put out Cloud 9. :aok
     
  14. theanthonyv

    theanthonyv Silver Supporting Member

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    For the most part, people who sing about screwing and/or revolting (i.e., testosterone infused music) trail off after they hit 40. They don't become less talented; they are just less passionate. It's not a pure coincidence that their hormones change around that time too. Plus, if they've attained any level of success, they become more concerned with enjoying and preserving their assets than with grinding out a career. In other words, they get soft and risk averse.
     
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  15. Kingsley Fats

    Kingsley Fats Member

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    There seems to be only a few examples (Lucinda, Iron Maiden) who have released these later albums in the last few years (2014 - 16).
    Are we living more and more in a state of nostalgia.
     
  16. beautiful liar

    beautiful liar Member

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    Sometimes I'm surprised there aren't more "mid-lif crisis" records. Good art feeds off (not always but often enough) of things like pain, self doubt, the desire for change, etc., all the kind of things that happen during mid-life crises. Why aren't there any, or at least many, records that dal with this?
     
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  17. magdream

    magdream Member

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    Rush - Counterparts. As good as anything in their catalog, though difficult to compare musically to their "prog" phase.
     
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  18. StratoCraig

    StratoCraig Member

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    Since 2013 we've had fine albums from Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Robin Trower, Tom Petty, Donald Fagen, Elvis Costello, David Bowie, Bryan Ferry, Robert Plant, Alice Cooper (with the Hollywood Vampires), and Santana, to name only the ones that I've bought myself.

    Aren't there? Wasn't that more or less what Springsteen's Tunnel of Love was about? And Metallica's St. Anger came out just as Hetfield was reaching 40. (Sorry, did you mean to limit the question to good albums?) One could argue that Dylan's brief born-again Christian phase (roughly 1979-1982) amounted to a manifestation of a mid-life crisis, as well.

    As to why there aren't more records like these, it could be because it's one thing to howl about your existential anguish in your twenties, but it's much more embarrassing in your forties. Mid-life crises tend to come out more in the form of divorces, affairs, drug problems, and/or retreats from the public eye.
     
  19. Hallogallo

    Hallogallo Member

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    All of these.
     
  20. beautiful liar

    beautiful liar Member

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    You probably have point with the first part. Regarding the second; those are exactly the sort of real-life things artists (musicians, poets, filmmakers) one would want them to impart their wisdom on. If art is supposed to mean something, that is. If it's just entertainment they (or their listeners) are after, then it wouldn't make much sense at all.
     

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