As maple and tru-oil ages..

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by SamBooka, Apr 14, 2016.

  1. SamBooka

    SamBooka Member

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    So to start I am in Canada and it is difficult to find many spray or stain products that are traditionally used in guitar finishing..

    I have a bare maple neck. The maple is VERY white.. I was able to get something very nice from the headstock face with spray shellac and rattle cans of clear nitro

    The back of the neck I would "like" to be a bit darker. I like the feel of a bare neck vs satin vs glossy. I have never tried tru-oil but might give it a whirl.

    Questions:
    1) Does maple darken with age the way , for example , pine does?
    2) Does tru-oil darken with age? I dont think it does but looking for opinions.

    Thanks
     
  2. Jack Daniels

    Jack Daniels Supporting Member

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    Yes to both. But most folks will use a dye to darken the maple first. RIT dye works just fine and is no toxic and can be bought at Walmart. Brown and Yellow makes a nice Amber color. Dampen the neck with a damp rag first. Then wipe hey dye on. Let dry. Repeat as required always dampening the neck first. You may have to use scotch brite or steel wool to get the raised grain smooth before,TruOil. Tru oil drys Amber and does age.
     
  3. SamBooka

    SamBooka Member

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    Thanks. One of the hardest parts of doing this neck is that I have tons of scrap maple but no nearly this white to see what the effects are like..
     
  4. Dan40

    Dan40 Supporting Member

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    Amber shellac will also leave a beautiful aged look and it makes for a very smooth playing surface. You could even wax over that if you want it even slicker.
     
  5. poolshark

    poolshark Supporting Member

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    BLO-deriviatives generally go on amber, and they definitely darken with age and exposure to the elements. I have a few necks finished in oil, and the color transition to the unexposed area at the neck pocket is pretty stark. It doesn't look like aged lacquer, though.
     

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