At Band Practice I can't hear myself, but...

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by 2HBStrat, Apr 8, 2015.

  1. 2HBStrat

    2HBStrat Member

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    I'm having trouble hearing myself at band practice, but when I listen back to the recordings, I'm plenty loud, if not sometimes TOO loud. Any ideas of a solution?
     
  2. slybird

    slybird Member

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    I have the same issue. I think it is psychological.
     
  3. tiktok

    tiktok Supporting Member

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    Put your ears where the mic is?

    Bands tend to practice in rooms that are too small for their volume level, with speakers not pointed in the optimum position for accurate monitoring. Also, if you're standing too close to a wall or corner, standing waves can develop which make it hard to hear yourself.
     
  4. dsj

    dsj Member

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    Tilt back amp stand - point the amp at your ears, and not your shins.
     
  5. micycle

    micycle Member

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    That's what I do - I have each of my 1x12s on raised amp stands and always point one toward myself. It makes a world of difference.
     
  6. tenchijin2

    tenchijin2 Member

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    Yeah, the recording is picking up exactly what the band sounds like at exactly where the mic is, nowhere else. So you need to work on placing yourself to hear your amp better.
     
  7. Bobby Wasabi

    Bobby Wasabi Member

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    This, and make sure you have enough mids.
     
  8. TDJMB

    TDJMB Gold Supporting Member

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    Can the practice space be treated acoustically? Watch some of the Real Traps videos. And don't forget to protect your ears.
     
  9. buddyboy69

    buddyboy69 Member

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    is there another guitarist, keys? if so you may be competing for frequencies. i play with a group and the first couple practices i brought a tele and a modern fender amp, which was what he played, and i couldnt tell if i was hearing me or him most of the time. i switched my guitar and used my blackface bassman and now we are on different planes and distinguishable. i know the bassman is fender, but it cuts through differently, more mid boost than mid scoop.
     
  10. GuitarGuy66

    GuitarGuy66 Member

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    Haunting mids at that.



    :red
     
  11. BMX

    BMX Supporting Member

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    As others have stated increase your mids. I also think it helps to not have your amp next to you. For example if everyone is standing in a circle and the bass player is across from you switch spots and leave the amps where they are.
     
  12. ChampReverb

    ChampReverb Silver Supporting Member

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    Get a longer cord and go stand next to the recording mic???????

    More seriously, I have the same problem at practice because my amp is serenading my socks. Sometimes I tilt it back and then I hear myself too much.

    -bEn r.
     
  13. Astronaut FX

    Astronaut FX Member

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    Number one, what the hell are haunting mids? Never understood that reference.

    Number two, can't hear yourself at practice? Good. It will better prepare you for gigs in venues where you won't be able to hear yourself and won't be able to do much about it.

    Band practice set ups that involve full PA, fully mic'd amps, and monitor mixes set you up for failure. I've always felt a minimal vocal monitor only set up for practice is best. It most accurately prepared you for worst possible gig conditions.
     
  14. fezz parka

    fezz parka Member

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    +1 to pointing the amp at your head. You might even turn down a little. :D
     
  15. saneff

    saneff Gold Supporting Member

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    Or at least move the amp further away from you. Tilting is good, but also when you are too close to your amp in a setting like that you can't hear it, but everyone else is being blasted.
     
  16. ZeyerGTR

    ZeyerGTR Supporting Member

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    +1

    Or, maybe just go ahead and get a full stack - some of the speakers will be near head-level! \m/ \m/
     
  17. kcprogguitar

    kcprogguitar Member

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    Try this, tell your drummer to lighten up. Problems will start solving themselves.

    It's like magic....
     
  18. SV5150

    SV5150 Member

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    You are most likely standing too close to your cab. If space pernits stand 6 - 8 feet from cab or point it towards your head
     
  19. modernp

    modernp Member

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    Are in ear monitors an option?
     
  20. jerrycampbell

    jerrycampbell Silver Supporting Member

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    + like, a billion. Makes all the difference in the world.
     

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