At what point should famous rockers hang it up?

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by Ben R, Jan 25, 2012.

  1. taez555

    taez555 Member

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    Maybe they all want to retire. Raising the ticket prices, to mortgage payment levels, is just their way of saying, "see.... we can't hack it anymore, no one will pay to see us, time to call it quits"

    :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  2. Rotten

    Rotten Silver Supporting Member

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    I think they should play as long as they can. I just wish they would age gracefully. There is nothing sadder than seeing an old man with obviously dyed long hair, with a belly hanging over skinny legs in tight leather -- not a good look.
     
  3. gennation

    gennation Member

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    Nobody should ever hang it up. The music is either in you or it isn't. But when it is, it never goes away.
     
  4. 84Bravo

    84Bravo Member

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    I wish I had seen Muddy and Wolf, live, old and sitting on a stool, wouldn't have mattered. Never got to see them live. Not so much respect for those who age in this culture. Pity.
     
  5. freedom's door

    freedom's door Member

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    This is exactly how i feel. Paul Stanley and David Lee Roth doing leaps and splits on stage when they were in their 20's was cool, now that their near 60, do away with the acrobatics (which i think both of them have).
    Also, i don't think it's unreasonable to expect that someone's abilities may diminish with age, but if your playing (or singing) is just a shadow of it's former self, then i say it's time to hang it up.
     
  6. Mark McPheeters

    Mark McPheeters Member

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    When there's no crowd left 'cept the earthworms.....
     
  7. supersoldier71

    supersoldier71 Member

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    If success is doing what you wanna do vs what you have to do we should all be so successful.
     
  8. russiancrowe

    russiancrowe Member

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    Honestly I don't think any of them give a flying rats-a$$ about their long-term legacy. Why would anyone worry about what other people think about them after they're dead. That's something their fans worry about.
     
  9. JPF

    JPF Member

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    when they've got nothing left to say, or else when it becomes clear that no one cares.
     
  10. Bob Longo

    Bob Longo Gold Supporting Member

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    Many years ago I went to John Lee Hooker's 70th birthday party in Madison Square Garden. EC, G Allman, Bonnie Rait, Joe Cocker, and many other aged rockers were there. It was awesome!!

    Also, I just saw Paul McCartney two years ago. He rocked.

    Who cares if some people think you should hang it up? I thought rock'n roll was about not giving a ****.
     
  11. wundergussy

    wundergussy Member

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    Johnny Cash put out some of the most relevant, interesting, and listenable music of his life in his last years. So I'm not willing to put a specific date on it. But, I think it's easier for a folky to sound relevant as he/she nears death than a rocker.
     
  12. Ben R

    Ben R Member

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    Oh, I disagree.

    If I were a world famous performer / song writer, I'd care about what people might think about me some day after I was gone. Your work is your legacy. It's the footprint that you leave behind. I would want my grandchildren and great grandchildren to see and hear me at my best. I would want to be remembered for my top work. Whatever my peak and best material was - that's what I would want people to remember me for. I acknowledge that you have to be proud and willing to stand by everything that you put out there. But, you probably would prefer that the best stuff stands out more often than not when people judge you through history. So, once the stuff that you're "putting out there" sucks, I don't think you're helping your legacy any. If I were already super rich, cashing in on those people still willing to pay me (even though I sucked) would be less important to me than my reputation. Then again, it's easy for me to say that from my obscure non-musical desk job.
    .
    .
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2012
  13. Mule

    Mule Member

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    When you cant bring it any more and people dont want to pay to see you it's time to hang it up. Until then....keep at it.
     
  14. guitaristanyc

    guitaristanyc Senior Member

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    When your sports cars and mansions are paid off, the paternity suits settled, and the interest generated by your investment portfolio guarantees you a regular supply of cocaine and hookers for the rest of your natural life.
     
  15. Shiny McShine

    Shiny McShine Member

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    It's all very clear when you're 16 how silly adults can look when they're over the hill and pretending they're young. However, most people lose this insight once they're over the hill. Hopefully you won't. I didn't. I know how ridiculous I could look at 56 by trying to do certain material or to try to look the part in more youthful bands.

    My advice (YMMV etc etc.): The key is to simply get a full length mirror, install it in your house where you face it when you get up in the morning. Take a good look each day so that your mental image matches the reality of your appearance. Then you'll be less likely to mistakenly believe that you are 20 years younger than you really are.

    Frankly, Keith scares me in Shine a Light. Mick does also. It was even more weird when they stacked all those 18 year-old beauties in the first 5 rows and you get the age contrast making them even look older. When Buddy Guy came on, he made them look like aged dandies. Still, Mick, Keith, Charlie, Ron... you're playing great so what do I know?
     
  16. Kiwi

    Kiwi Silver Supporting Member

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    The work, or rep, is harder to destroy than you might think. The early, great stuff will last despite the decades that may follow of sub-par performances. It's the original songs and the playing that endure, and those can't ever be erased.

    I think you're missing the third reason (besides money or rep) why aging rockers keep at it. They've got plenty of money, and their reputations are secure for generations to come. Why keep at it?

    What they want now is attention, to be seen, to stay current in the culture. Led Zep tunes selling Caddys, the Who at the Super Bowl, McCartney or the Stones touring as they near their 70s, or Les Paul playing every week at the Iridium past the age of 90.

    That's payment in a very different currency than cash or legacy. That's what's valuable, and that's what you're proposing that they should give up.
    =K
     
  17. acguitar84

    acguitar84 Member

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    I really don't care about how they look, I just hope they can still perform. And as long as they can....and people are buying tickets to see them, why not? Rock isn't just for 20 somethings, it's for everyone.
     
  18. TravisE

    TravisE Supporting Member

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    I think it's different for everyone and, in part, every genre. When an artist ceases to be an artist and becomes a parody of their former self, it's time to stop.

    Dylan, Petty, Neil Young, Paul Simon, etc, should absolutely continue. As long as they keep introducing great music to the world, there's no reason to quit.


    IMO, Skynard should stop.
     
  19. JPF

    JPF Member

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    I think there's a huge difference in the whys and how's of not hanging it up that depends on whether said aging rocker has attained financial security or not. I suspect that many a big name didn't, for whatever reasons, and are now trying to catch up in the midst of the baby-boomer fuelled nostalgia vacuum.
     
  20. Tonekat

    Tonekat Supporting Member

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    Same here. You hope they're not doing it to pay debts, but if they are just having a good time, more power to them.
     

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