At what stage in Clapton's career did he...

Vian

Member
Messages
56
I've always remembered some piece of "critique" about Clapton that I read *years* ago, maybe in a Rolling Stone review, it said that if Clapton didn't have his voice, he would have been forgotten pretty quickly.
And then Rolling Stone rated him 2nd best guitarist of all time.
 

GerryJ

Member
Messages
4,990
As mentioned, improvement in the 80s, especially technique, when he turned sober. Further improvement in the late 90s, when he may have given up (or cut way back) on cigarettes; at least it sounds that way. Around the time he got married and had kids, impetus to kick the habit.
 

Sub City

Member
Messages
1,459
I thought the double live LP, Just One Night, from 1980 was Clapton really hitting his stride on vocals, i.e. Worried Life Blues, Double Trouble, etc. I liked his vocals from Derek & the Dominoes on; Delaney & Bonnie really got him focused on singing, and it paid off nicely.
 

GrungeMan

Member
Messages
6,484
Maybe the Admin can start a new Forum for those who want to hear boy-band voices on classic rock n blues tunes. For the life of me I don't know why? Those said tunes would then loose their edge... no longer rock or blues, they would be perty, yuk!

In MHOP there is nothing wrong with Eric's, Neil's Hiatt's Bon's Dylan's or others vocals, it suits their music.

Autotune should not be in the studio at the same time with Rock n Roll or The Blues!
 
Last edited:

Route234

Member
Messages
8,943
When he started working with Phil Collins. Ive always liked his voice, but I think he found the confidence he had been lacking when he did the albums with Collins. As someone said earlier I think this also coincides with sobriety.
 
Messages
743
I've always thought his singing was right in line with his material and musical direction. I loved his vocals on the Layla album (which I'm listening to at the moment) The singing is as impassioned, heartfelt and anguished as the songwriting, the tracks themselves and the guitar playing. It's a total package.
His singing style got more laid back along with the albums of the mid 70s. The poppier stuff in the 80s saw stronger vocals, just right for the material.
Really, I think he's always been a bit of a chameleon musically and while I am primarily a fan of his guitar work, and always will be, I think being Eric Clapton after 1974 is about being an artist in a number of inseparable categories
 

TNJ

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
28,772
I don't consider him a singer at all. I consider him a guttural accompanist to his guitar playing.
Wow...aint no accounting for taste.
I consider Clapton to have one of the finest rock/blues voices of about any virtuoso guitarist I can think of.
Vince Gill has him beat, but he's the only one, IMO.

*are you a troll, by chance? :)


S.
j
 

big mike

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
12,867
Become the singer he is today? I really like the way Eric sings now, but earlier material like Layla, Slowhand, etc. were weak in comparison. When do you think he "turned the corner"?
Probably around 'Behind the sun'. Early 80s.
 

GerryJ

Member
Messages
4,990
Vince Gill has everyone beat technique wise for singing and playing. That's why he's been at ECs festivals.
 

gmann

Member
Messages
8,627
I've always remembered some piece of "critique" about Clapton that I read *years* ago, maybe in a Rolling Stone review, it said that if Clapton didn't have his voice, he would have been forgotten pretty quickly.

I'm too young to really know if that's true, but its always stuck with me. I'm personally not in awe of his playing, and my favorite Clapton stuff is about the song, good melody, etc.
I'm not really familiar with the RS review. I do remember reading an EC interview where he credits Delaney Bramlett with him becoming a singer. Delaney encouraged him saying that if you don't start singing you'll always be someones guitar player.
 

gmann

Member
Messages
8,627
Name me a white singer who you would say was a blues singer then?. Unless you mean the only people who can sing blues must have a baritone or deeper voice. That leaves Leonard Cohen and Nick Cave to sing blues and they don't.
Kinda partial to Gregg Allman as a singer. As for EC, I think he's a fine singer, in a variety of styles.
 

Route234

Member
Messages
8,943
Wow...aint no accounting for taste.
I consider Clapton to have one of the finest rock/blues voices of about any virtuoso guitarist I can think of.
Vince Gill has him beat, but he's the only one, IMO.

*are you a troll, by chance? :)


S.
j
Id consider the notion that Vince Gill is a better rock/blues singer and guitar player than Clapton to be pretty troll worthy.
 

sixty2strat

Member
Messages
11,577
I like his singing with Cream, he Kills it on Crossroads. After that it seems to have gone down hill to a low with Rock n Roll Heart. YES AIR SUPPLY was the perfect analogy. So I must think He's had it in him, but production, material and no one like Bruce to drive him has hurt him. I seems to have got better in the 80-90's, if the material worse.
 

TNJ

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
28,772
Id consider the notion that Vince Gill is a better rock/blues singer and guitar player than Clapton to be pretty troll worthy.
Seriously? ...I think Vince could sing circles around Eric on about any song.
Eric is a good singer. Vince is a GREAT singer.


My .02 though,

S.
j
 
Last edited:




Trending Topics

Top