Attaching a mixer to an MBOX

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by teamster, Jan 30, 2006.


  1. teamster

    teamster Guest

    I have heard of a lot of people using a small mixer with their mbox (or similar piece of hardware). What is the exact purpose? Are you running say 6 channels of drum mics into the mixer, then sending the stereo out from the mixer into the Mbox? Are you using an I/O setup
    (mixer-->Mbox-->computer-->Mbox-->mixer) for monitoring purposes? I hope this question makes sense. Any advice would be great. I am just getting to the point where I need more than 2 channels from my mbox, and I want to look at all the options available before I decide to upgrade.
    Thanks!
     
  2. Matt Gordon

    Matt Gordon Senior Member

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    I can't speak for anyone but me, but I use one to supply phantom power to mic's requiring it. I run my Mbox 2 on a Mac platform, and unfortunately the Powerbooks still have issues with their USB ports being able to supply the 48v needed to run phantom power. I guess folks need more inputs for drums mixes, live recording, etc.
     
  3. onemind

    onemind Member

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    With my Digi-001 (and now OO2R) I've always used an outboard mixer for monitoring purposes. this was my own way of battling any latency issues, Monitoring was done strictly off the buss of the mixer so there was no delay. I always have a hardware fx processor patched in as well to give vocalists some "space" in their headphone mix to enhance their performance. Of course the mixer can be used to submix to a stereo signal for recording as well.

     
  4. exhausted

    exhausted Member

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    i've started using a little mixer just to wrangle all my inputs instead of constantly beating on the jacks on the mbox. and for some outboard effecting of vocals and stuff. i just feed the main outs to the mbox and leave everything plugged in.

    i'm still monitoring through the mbox but i'm trying to find a better way to do things. i only just added the mixer.
     
  5. MichaelK

    MichaelK Member

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    Simple: Use a mixer with M-box if you're recording more than two sources. MBox can only use two inputs at a time.
     
  6. tonefreak

    tonefreak Member

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    I use two Mackie 1202 VLZ Pros... one for monitoring and another as a 'patchbay'. Plus this set-up has no latency.
     
  7. LSchefman

    LSchefman Supporting Member

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    I use a mixer's buss outputs to send signal to my interface's inputs, and send the interface's outputs to my mixer's channel inputs. This requires a mixer with buss outputs.

    My mixer, for example, has 16 buss outputs, and 64 inputs, which allows me to mix the interface's outputs (usually I run two 8 channel interfaces) with synths and outboard effects, to monitor with no latency while I record, and to buss different submixes to computer inputs.

    I used to slave my digital gear to analog tape machines as well, but I no longer do this, having sold my analog machine years ago. Most mixers have talkback mics and allow you to send different monitor mixes to the talent, to talk with them, and so on. This is very convenient.

    However, there are as many solutions and configurations as there are recordists and mixer types.
     
  8. MichaelK

    MichaelK Member

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    The MBox has a dial that allows you to monitor the inputs with zero latency.

    I've used the Mbox on my Powerbook with two phantom powered mics and had no problem. The Powerbook's power cable was connnected, so maybe that helped...?? I have not tried it running on battery power.
     

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