Audiophiles/Vinyl enthusiasts.

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by jawajt, Jan 3, 2015.

  1. jawajt

    jawajt Member

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    Hey all. Looking for some advice for listening to some great audio. Recently I was leaning towards getting a turntable setup for a better listening experience for SOME of my music collection. However, I was just reading up on PONO. i'm wondering if one is better than the other. Obviously, Pono is more portable, but that's not a huge concern to me. Also, a Pono setup seems a bit cheaper than a whole TT setup. Also, I get conflicting opinions on which sounds better: Lossless or Vinyl. Unless....
    For you TT fans: I'm currently running my iTunes through my Focusrite Saffire Pro 40 and KRK Rockit reference monitors, which I use for my Logic X recording. Personally, I think my iTunes library sounds pretty good through it. Do you think running a good TT and preamp into the Focusrite and Rockits would be a viable option? Would I be better off with a dedicated TT setup (preamp, receiver, speakers,etc.)
    For reference I was leaning towards the U-Turn for a TT. Any info is greatly appreciated. Cheers
     
  2. MrTAteMyBalls

    MrTAteMyBalls Member

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    You don't need to spend a lot to get a good setup for vinyl. Look on craigslist or the goodwill online auction site for vintage pioneer receiver or yamaha or marantz. I got mine for 40 bucks. It sounds soooo warm and full. Get some good speakers from craigslist or goodwill and you are set

    I.prefer to have a workspace with my computer and monitors and a completely separate setup for recreational listening.
     
  3. jawajt

    jawajt Member

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    Thanks for the advice. I've heard that a good, vintage receiver goes a long way. I have a local TV repair shop that probably could refurbish an older TT and receiver.
     
  4. Bill McDowell

    Bill McDowell Gold Supporting Member

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    turntable technology has come a long way since when I was a kid. Just replaced an old denon turntable with a new rega turntable - night and day is the difference. Rega RP1 - check it out.
     
  5. suckamc

    suckamc Supporting Member

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    Stay away from Crosley, but you probably already know that.
     
  6. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    I got a music hall turntable used, mated it to an NAD integrated amp off ebay for 120 bucks, and some Panasonic bookshelf speakers for $129/pr that were strongly recommended (the Pioneer SP-BS22-LR Andrew Jones Designed Bookshelf Loudspeakers) and it sounds fantastic for a budget system. Warm and very three dimensional. I added a used subwoofer I had from an old Cambridge soundworks home theatre system and I have a great system for around 500 or less. I'm going to upgrade to a better sounding floor standing speaker pair at some point, but I've been enjoying playing both old and new vinyl on this rig. It sounds so much better than listening on an iPod. Plus I really like the relaxation of picking a few albums and staying out while listening and checking out the cover art or just hanging out.
     
  7. 4inchjones

    4inchjones Member

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    My wife and I got ourselves a turntable for Xmas this year-just a cheap $130 Sony run through our home theater system. Hardly an audiophile level setup, lol. The thing is, even so it's a very noticeable difference. I guess it's the mastering methods needed for vinyl. Theres so much more dynamic range. No clipping, everything is somehow "rounder" and more organic. I got a couple of the new remastered Beatles and Zeppelin albums. Songs I've heard hundreds of times on CD...I heard detail on vinyl I've never noticed before. I was pretty impressed. I'm really enjoying listening to music again.
     
  8. S. F. Sorrow

    S. F. Sorrow Member

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    Just get a turntable. Don't blow a bunch of money on one -the most important part is the cartridge. Make sure it's an elliptical needle (better definition) and the cartridge gets close to 20-20,000 hz. You can get decent ones under $100.
    The only important part of a turntable is a weight adjustable arm and anti-skating control.
     
  9. jawajt

    jawajt Member

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    Thanks everyone for the great suggestions. I'm likely going to go with the U-Turn or something similar. Those come with really good cartridges, from what I've read. I look into integrated amps or receivers more. I'll definitely check out those Pioneer speakers.
     
  10. illinimax

    illinimax Gold Supporting Member

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    Get a Rega RP1 with the performance pack upgrade if your budget allows
     
  11. sacakl

    sacakl Silver Supporting Member

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    This is exactly what I use into a Scott 299a. Everything sounds great and the RP1 is no muss, no fuss.
     
  12. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    Get a turntable and a FiiO X5. The X5 has the best sounding digital audio I've ever heard.....almost like a good turntable.
     
  13. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    On top of what I posted, late last week I hit a pawn shop locally and found a set of Polk SLi7 bookshelf ('monitor') speakers for next to nothing. They were banged up but mechanically soubd, and I repaired the grill with plastic weld epoxy and now good as new. Those speakers are the missing ingredient to my budget audiophile setup. Although the Pioneers are great, the Polks are solid and love to be pushed hard. They sound amazing. So all total I have a killer setup for just over 4 or 5 hundred, and I haven't played a CD in weeks after throwing some records on. But there are plenty of great components out there for cheap, wgich can save money that can be applied to great speakers. I think a great system could be had if you don't mind budget shopping or shuffling through craigslist and evil bay. My buddy did the same thing recently and scored a great set of vintage speakers for 60 bucks, and throwing on some 70s Stones on vinyl, it's just fantastic sounding. His speaker cabs are solid wood with a very good crossover. Bulletproof. And another 75 bucks got him a vintage integrated amp and turntable. He upgraded the stylus. I couldn't on my old Sony since the stylus was not removable. But his new old system sounds great too. Highly recommended!
     
  14. aman74

    aman74 Member

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    Checkout the article on thewirecutter....it talks about most of the models mentioned here.
     
  15. aman74

    aman74 Member

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    I've heard mention of the Andrew Jones speakers, but you mentioned Panasonic...is there a Panasonic rebadged version or something?
     
  16. Dereksslide

    Dereksslide Member

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    If you can't afford this, look at the Project Debut line. Remember you'll either need an external phono stage or an amp with one built in (I think very few turntables come with them built in and they're usually pretty crap).

    Edit: Oh, whatever you get fit an Ortofon 2M red.
     
  17. Srvwannab

    Srvwannab Member

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    I have an old Thorens turntable I've picked up from my brother in law. How does that stack up with what is being made now? Thanks!
     
  18. EataPeach

    EataPeach Member

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    I have been getting back into vinyl. Loving it.
    I have a Pioneer 838 receiver pushing a or if Klipsch KG4's and a or if Klipsch bookshelf speakers. Had the iPod into the aux. the turntable is a Technics DD22

    Theres such a difference!! An example...
    I have had VH1 since the day it came out. Havent listened to the vinyl version in over 25 yrs. So I have become very familiar with the Cd/mp3 sounds of it.

    I put that vinyl on and it was like another world. You can hear the nuancesong forgotten. I sip upload theres only so much info the 0's and 1's can absorb.
    Those vinyl grooves have so much more to offer.

    I love the artwork of vinyl. I can see it better and feel like a kid every time I slide an LP out of the sleeve
     
  19. Jackie Treehorn

    Jackie Treehorn Member

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    Until you get into the better vinyl set ups, $200-400 low output moving coils, good arms that allow the cartridge to be set up objectively with test records, protractors, etc, record cleaning machines, etc. you are not going to beat good digital. All you're doing is trading one set of compromises for another.

    I got seriously back into vinyl about 15 years ago when I lived in the Bay Area and vinyl was very cheap as well as a lot of the gear. Now vinyl is quite expensive, so if you don't already have a lot of it, I'm not sure it's going to be a satisfying endeavor if you are seeking immediate audio gratification. If you're just want to spin a couple records or enjoy "the journey," go for it.

    There are a lot of great sounding records, and they do absolutely sound incredible, especially things like the Van Gelder era jazz records. You're hearing them as they were originally intended, from the tapes when they were new, not after being baked and remastered numerous times. There's no question in my mind that vinyl, on the mid-high level is superior. On the budget end, there's no question that digital is superior. It's going to take a lot more cash and effort to get a vinyl rig to truly sound better in every aspect than a $200 CD player.

    However, if I were starting from scratch, I think I would lean towards hi res digital. That's just going to get better/cheaper and more plentiful while good vinyl will go the opposite.

    As a side note, should you pursue vinyl, I would absolutely look into older used gear. A few years ago my wife and I bought one of the entry level decks, music hall or project, for my brother in law. We did it online so I didn't hear it, but assumed it would be good based on reputation. I was astonished at how terrible it sounded when I heard it. Something like an sl1200 would be a much better choice. Their big drawback is more the harder, cd-like sound but they do sound pretty good regardless.

    I'm not sure what the prices are these days, but I would also recommend the Scott, Fisher tube receivers and integrated amps over their later solid state counterparts.

    Lots of vinyl threads lately!
     
  20. stratology

    stratology Member

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    I'm always baffled when I see 'vinyl' and 'audiophile' in the same sentence. My understanding of audiophile would be to reproduce audio as truly as possible, add nothing, subtract nothing.

    When I used to play vinyl, there was noise (THUNK, KCHHHHH) every time the tone arm hit the surface of the record, and lots of noise (KCHHH) between tracks, where there is no music.

    An audiophile record player would mean: absolute silence before the first track, and between tracks.

    The noise is masked when the music starts, pops and crackles from static electricity are masked, but that's not what I would think of as audiophile..


    Vinyl does sound different. Vinyl mastering often means cutting out frequencies above 16kHz, and summing the bass to mono. Gotta keep the needle in the groove.
    That may subjectively sound more pleasant. Maybe a slightly narrower frequency range is easier to process for the brain.


    The one thing I do miss from the vinyl days is the fantastic artwork on the covers.
     

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