autotune on guitar

JasonAz

Member
Messages
1,007
Im flipping through guitar world. Theres this guitar the AT-200 with autotune built in to keep it sounding in tune.. Which leads me to wonder, I wonder if theres a pedal that can do this, so we all dont need to buy this guitar that we probably dont want. My guess though, is that it probably does each string individually..possibly. If there was an autotune pedal for guitar, that could be pretty cool i suppose, but that would be hard because its polyphonic.
I do use autotune on anything thats monophonic when I record
 

JamonGrande

Member
Messages
1,852
The Roland vg-8 system that had a "tuning" mode that would pitch shift strings to be in tune. Never used it live for that reason, but did use it to get on the fly alternate tunings.

I don't remember the details for the two auto tune guitars, but I would imagine a hexaphonic signal was the method of detection and processing, since you are dealing with hexaphonic pitch shifting

I've inadvertently run an acoustic guitar through an auto tuned mic (I'm not offended by the tech as long as its used for artistic purposes). Very strange response, the auto tune did not like chords or the plain strings for some reason

If ur out of tune, blame the bass player

Joe
 

dwolfggc

Member
Messages
434
I look at Auto tune as something people use when they don't want to learn how to sing properly.

Yeah, that would be true if you are using it as an entire album thing or even for an entire song. However, last summer I did some studio work that I paid for myself. We were running short on time and I did the vocals for six songs in four hours. At least two takes each song and somtimes five or six takes on certain sections. At the end of the session my voice was tired there were certain parts that I just couldn't maintain pitch on. Long drawn out notes and certain lower notes especially. Auto tune is a god send if you're nudging a note here or there up or down a few semitones
 

KevinFinn

Member
Messages
1,714
You can't just "learn how to sing properly" in regard to perfect pitch.

You either have great pitch or you don't. You can get it marginally better, but it's not a technique to the degree other vocal things are. Still, plenty of great vocalists are not great singers - from Jagger, to Dylan, to Anthony Kiedis... none of them "sing really well" pitch-wise. They succeeded despite that.

The push for mathematic perfection in increasingly digital music is what is leading to a shift in vocal expectations.

The guitar is not far behind in what will be required of it in the coming century. I've seen plenty of pros in Nashville who are increasingly aware of guitar's inherent imperfection where intonation is concerned of late. It's standing out more and more when they try to push guitar in a mix that is otherwise pitch-perfect.
 

JamonGrande

Member
Messages
1,852
I don't know if I necessarily agree with the "you have it or you don't" aspect, but I certainly agree in regards to so many popular vocalists whose less than perfect intonation is a part of their "style."

I would also agree about the shift in expectations as well, I don't find it much different than overly quantized rhythms. Notes are now "thinner" than Kate Moss.

But along those lines, I think double tracking was often used to hide so many vocal take imperfections - an analog solution to the same problem. The only difference is that it produced a "thickness" that many find aurally pleasing.

From a historical perspective, there were somewhat similar debates in the 1800s regarding the effect of pitch standardization and intonation - all products of technological/scientific influences colliding with aesthetic preferences.

joe
 

mcdes

Member of no importance
Messages
7,545
so i could play whatever solo, all over the fretboard, wherever my fingers fell........ turn on auto tune, and ill turn into Joe Satriani? Or John Mayer!!!.................... where do i sign up!







LOL
 

tteixeira

Member
Messages
350
Auto tune: a tool, just like any other, that can be used for constructive artistic purposes, or "misused" (read: uses that guitarists think are cheating).
 

JasonAz

Member
Messages
1,007
an autotune pedal would actually be very good for a bass player.. I always run autotune on my bass tracks when recording.
 

thebigkevdogg

Member
Messages
86
May I interrupt the outrage to say that I would have a lot of fun with such a pedal and have been wondering the same thing. I would enjoy a "hard tune" setting for some glitchy fun. I play pedal steel guitar and think I could make some crazy noises with a steel in hard tuning mode. Could also be useful for drop tuning for a song or two. Would have to be incredibly fast tracking (better than the POG). Strymon?
 
Last edited:

Shiny McShine

Member
Messages
9,493
You can't just "learn how to sing properly" in regard to perfect pitch.

You either have great pitch or you don't. You can get it marginally better, but it's not a technique to the degree other vocal things are. Still, plenty of great vocalists are not great singers - from Jagger, to Dylan, to Anthony Kiedis... none of them "sing really well" pitch-wise. They succeeded despite that.

The push for mathematic perfection in increasingly digital music is what is leading to a shift in vocal expectations.

The guitar is not far behind in what will be required of it in the coming century. I've seen plenty of pros in Nashville who are increasingly aware of guitar's inherent imperfection where intonation is concerned of late. It's standing out more and more when they try to push guitar in a mix that is otherwise pitch-perfect.

The real reason there are so many horrible singers is this belief.

Here, let me help...

"You either can play like Jimi Page or you can't."
"You either can get on the NBA or you can't."

or taken further...

"You shouldn't have to work at anything. If you're gifted, it will just happen."
 

bobbyatomic

Member
Messages
1,331
so i could play whatever solo, all over the fretboard, wherever my fingers fell........ turn on auto tune, and ill turn into Joe Satriani? Or John Mayer!!!.................... where do i sign up!

Just stick on a Cd of Satriani, or Mayer, unplug your guitar, and voilà, instant sonic nirvana, also works well with tennis rackets.

I can understand why an auto tune could be useful for recording, but seriously, if you're not even playing what you're playing, what's the point in playing?
 

kimock

Member
Messages
12,520
You can't just "learn how to sing properly" in regard to perfect pitch.

You either have great pitch or you don't. You can get it marginally better, but it's not a technique to the degree other vocal things are. Still, plenty of great vocalists are not great singers - from Jagger, to Dylan, to Anthony Kiedis... none of them "sing really well" pitch-wise. They succeeded despite that.

The push for mathematic perfection in increasingly digital music is what is leading to a shift in vocal expectations.

The guitar is not far behind in what will be required of it in the coming century. I've seen plenty of pros in Nashville who are increasingly aware of guitar's inherent imperfection where intonation is concerned of late. It's standing out more and more when they try to push guitar in a mix that is otherwise pitch-perfect.


You're entitled to your opinion of course, but those three things, IDing a pitch in isolation as one of 12 "notes", singing in tune in a harmonically functional way, and using an electronic device to manipulate a pitch to agree with equal temperament are three completely independent systems.
None of them depend on either of the others, and they could all easily function such that the same "note" could correctly be three different frequencies.

The natural seventh of A, the blue note G, for a most obvious example would be neither the ET auto-tune pitch, or the likely pitch that a person with perfect pitch would pull out of the air for "G".
It's almost a quarter tone away from the minor third of E "G".

Right? If it's ET pitch correction, by definition it's atonal, so it can't be "properly sung" in a piece of tonal music.
The range of functional commas is about 1/4 tone, and the pitch correction isn't that smart yet, so you're better off just making music without it.
Pitch correction is an abomination, unless of course you're into that atonal modern country robot sound. .:bonk
 

FourThirtyTwo

Member
Messages
394
Perfect pitch does not exist. It is a complete misnomer. Physics dictates this.

Note names are meaningless. The only thing a person could do is take one note and then sing (or identify) another note in a given scale and then declare the interval. It is 101% not possible to just sing a "G" (or whatever) out of thin air. If you do it, then you're doing it from previous learned behavior.

I'm so tired of the perfect pitch arguments. It is a manufactured concept!
 




Trending Topics

Top Bottom