Avoiding "clicky-ness" in compressors

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by SHinNash, Feb 16, 2020.

  1. SHinNash

    SHinNash Member

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    How do you guys manage it? I'm an always on compressor guy, and I use only very mild settings with my Cali76 Compact Deluxe, but I still fight the clicky sound, as I have with every compressor I own. You guys have any great secrets for avoiding the clicky sound?
     
  2. jaydub69

    jaydub69 Member

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    It’s important for me that I control just how much I’m compressing the signal. You haven’t stated what your settings are, but I would start there.
    Also, if your unit has an Attack adjustment, rolling it off (or on, whatever the case on yours) could alleviate the problem. Furthermore, other pedals can be adding compression to the signal, particularly from gain.
     
  3. Baskervils

    Baskervils Member

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    I like some of that clicky-ness, but... I have some compressors that are very poppy and severe, like the Boss CS-1 and the ZVex Lofi Junky.

    If the attack is not adjustable (and I thought that it was on the Cali76 Compact Deluxe), you can try turning down the volume going in either with your guitar or putting a preamp pedal in front of it to soften the incoming gain. Another option is to use a swell pedal, like the Mooer Slow Engine or EHX Attack Decay, but that will alter your sound quite a bit. Those are fun pedals, though.
     
  4. thesjkexperienc

    thesjkexperienc ^^^ I made this guitar^^^

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    I use an Optical comp, Diamond Comp Jr, and it only has that sound at extreme settings where I set mine in the middle. You might back the comp off a bit until the clicking disappears. I’m not familiar with your comp, other than it’s one of the best out there, so hopefully someone else can guide you on the actual knobs to twist.
     
    awallace likes this.
  5. VintagePlayerStrat

    VintagePlayerStrat Supporting Member

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    I was looking at compressors the last month or so. Narrowed it down to a Wampler Ego and Xotic SP.

    I didn't use heavy compression settings on either, (love me some blend knob) but the Ego clicked fairly often and the SP did not at all. That's not the only reason, but I picked the SP in part because of that.
     
  6. lefort_1

    lefort_1 Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt Gold Supporting Member

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    If it's happened with lots of compressors, then it's either:

    a) the compression at Attack is too strong

    or

    b) pick technique.

    If you have trouble backing off the attack-snap on a flexible compressor (one that can selectively control that snap vs main-envelope sustain levels), then I've got to look into the actual technique being used... maybe TRY a lighter pick hand, or a lighter pick. Compressors are a very technique-sensitive thing. I've had a tough time getting the exact thing I want out of chicken-pickin due to a similar thing, but it is MY problem, not the broad family of compressors in general.
     
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  7. shoepedals

    shoepedals Vendor

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    Usually this is because too much compression is being applied and the attack is too slow to catch the initial transient. People do this on purpose for drums, but for guitar you'd probably want a gentler compression setting. I believe the Cali76, if it's like an 1176, has a minimum ratio of 4:1, which is quite a lot of compression. But you can just dial down the input gain to make it less apparent and increase the output gain to compensate.

    1176 compressors are ridiculously fast at the highest attack setting also, so if you set the attack to the fastest, it shouldn't really be apparently clicky. If it's faithful to the original design, it should be like 50 microseconds attack time at the fastest setting, which shouldn't let much of anything through.

    Compressors in general are very tweaky devices to make sound transparent, so it's pretty normal to get it slightly wrong at first before you find the right settings for your source. Happens all the time in the studio.
     
  8. SHinNash

    SHinNash Member

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    Man this is great information. I so wish the Cali 76 Compact Deluxe had a real I/O meter so I could monitor things like that.

    Do you have any idea the ballpark of unity gain for a Cali? I know it totally depends on the guitar, but just a ballpark, it’s hard to know.
     
  9. tonedover

    tonedover Silver Supporting Member

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    gotta be, i would think
     
  10. Kennyscrown

    Kennyscrown Member

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    Would this not be alleviated using a blend control? I.e blending in more of the the dry, uncompressed signal?

    this is what I hated about compressors, as well as the noise, and I was also going to get the Ego or the SP so I could blend in the dry signal. However, I tried a Rothwell LoveSqueeze and,erm, loved it. I also think if you time is too trebly, rolling back the tone helps to eliminate the clicking.

    actually, I’m probably completely wrong about this!
     

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