Band Rehearsal ProTips thread

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by TeleBlack, Mar 23, 2015.

  1. TeleBlack

    TeleBlack Senior Member

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    Lets hear them. What you think is obvious someone else might say "Duh, of course!"

    Here's mine, keep that volume as low as your drummer's playing will allow.
     
  2. amstrtatnut

    amstrtatnut Member

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  3. hubberjub

    hubberjub Silver Supporting Member

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    Record your rehearsals. My last band had everyone miced and recorded everything. We'd spend half our day playing, and the second half listening back and critiquing it.
     
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  4. TheoDog

    TheoDog Silver Supporting Member

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    Rehearse at rehearsal. Practice at home.
    Take notes... with a pencil.
     
  5. Bankston

    Bankston Member

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    We do this also but our bass player emails the songs to us so we can work on parts at home and then fix things at rehearsal.

    When we're preparing for a show, we blow through the set then go back afterward if something wasn't right.

    Any time left is spent jamming/writing new material since we write as a band.
     
  6. BigSB

    BigSB Member

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    +100 on keeping the flipping volume down so the singer(s) don't have to work their voice too hard, esp if you have songs that are demanding.

    Time of rehearsal start is REHEARSAL START, not tuning up and screwing around start. When renting a space, allow 10 minutes for plugging in, tuning up and chatting. Trust me, make the clock your boss in rehearsal from the outset and you'll be shocked how efficient your setup time on the gig will become.

    If you have your own space, have each player invest in a kit of "#$×&%" items that are easily lost, forgotten or shorted out, like picks, cables, capos and batteries or an extra power supply or two. Otherwise, make sure each player keeps their portable supply stocked. Nothing is more aggravating than a pedal or something not working when rehearsing with it in realtime settings is important.

    On a more personal note, if anyone is going through a bad time and/or there's band business besides playing to handle, COMMUNICATE THAT before you arrive and build the discussion time into your total rehearsal time. Nothing makes bad/sad/uncomfortable/pressing issues more stressful or potentially ugly than springing it on others or letting the talking wipe out your work time. Rehearsal is for music. if something is so important it needs that much time, reschedule the rehearsal when your attention isn't divided. if an upcoming gig requires play now/talk later, put on the big-boy pants and get it done. Anything more drastic than that would likely involve skipping an upcoming gig anyway.

    Do your everloving homework and learn your flipping parts before. BEFORE. You're not good enough to fake it or wing it if everyone else did the woodshedding. Period.
     
  7. Frank Prince

    Frank Prince Member

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    Learn your parts cold before rehearsal.
    Don't get hammered during rehearsal.
    Don't force everyone to be there every week unless they really need to or want to. Rehearsal is for preparing for paid public gigs, not to do unpaid private gigs in your basement.
     
  8. derekd

    derekd Supporting Member

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    This

    Have the structure of the song charted out. The trick is always the transitions. Having those suckers in your head beforehand saves a ton of time.
     
  9. TeleBlack

    TeleBlack Senior Member

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    I totally agree with practice at home, rehearse with the band.
     
  10. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    Fix stuff that sucked at the last gig.

    Learn the songs at home, then play through them at rehearsal, fixing any parts and working out stuff like harmonies and endings.

    If you're getting a set together, run the set and then fix stuff after.
     
  11. BADHAK

    BADHAK Member

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    I'm enduring (just) playing in a band with a bassist, who after 12 weeks and 8 rehearsals, working on the same 15 classic rock songs, asks before every song, "hows this go, what's the key, you sure i don't play during the verses of Highway to Hell??"
    Seems to be a decent player with good techniques but man, fricken lazy as.
     
  12. Defendant

    Defendant Member

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    If you're a groove band, a nice way to ease in to a practice (originals or covers) is to pick another band's song you all like and know in your style, play it on the PA and ease the band in playing it. Band members can turn up to practice in all different states of tiredness, stress, excitement etc, and having to focus on a good groove straight away can help everyone forget themselves and focus on what good feel is.

    For general groove work, drop down to drums only, add bass, then slowly add other instruments one by one. This will make the rhythm section focus and help everyone spot problems with parts, timing and overplaying.

    One thing I've noticed is that some players who learn tunes in their own time by only playing along with the recordings can struggle to learn arrangements. With every tune I learn, I write out an arrangement by counting bars. Then I make a single page A3 print with this arrangement clearly written. This has two benefits:

    -I personally get the arrangement clear in my head and minimize my own arrangement mistakes.
    -I can take this arrangement to practice and point out arrangements to others.
     
  13. bigtone23

    bigtone23 Member

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    Practice just a hair slower than the anticipated performance tempo. If there isn't a click live, there is almost always a little adrenaline push to the tempos.

    Make sure the vocal PA and mix is clear. Tight, rehearsed vocals and harmonies really wow the average listener.
     
  14. Yer Blues

    Yer Blues Member

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    The most important thing is everybody shows up and has down what they are suppose to. Right now neither band I am with rehearses much, but when we do it's usually to work on specific parts of songs that the band has not been getting right. We rarely play songs the entire way through. If it's an intro we run through the intro and part of the first verse a couple times. If it's a break we start towards the end of the chorus/verse/lead before the break. Focus on what we need to get right, not what we already get right.
     
  15. Yer Blues

    Yer Blues Member

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    I like the idea of recording, but I don't know anyone I play with who has the time to go back and listen to rehearsal. Everybody is stretched thin enough with multiple projects/gigs and other commitments. Can't imagine someone going back to listen to 2-3 hours of rehearsal. It does sound like a great idea though.

    One of the bands I play with a guy records nearly every gig which serves the same purpose. Although messing up at a gig is worse than doing it at a practice.
     
  16. stratocat63

    stratocat63 Member

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    Yes. I prefer to cycle through whatever needs work, whether it is a line, a break, a vocal harmony section, phrase, ending, intro, whatever. Loop it so to speak, until it is nailed down. As opposed to starting from the beginning, playing all the way up to the problem section, predictably mess it up, then start from the beginning again as if it will magically fix itself. Eventually it may get fixed but it could have been done in a fraction of the time spent.
     
  17. swiveltung

    swiveltung Member

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    I like this.....

    as well as:
    To warm up..... What was a problem last gig?, work on that song.
    List of new songs to go over...
    Last: personal issues or problems. (That way you don't put a cloud on things right at the start!)
     
  18. Lephty

    Lephty Member

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    Yes--taking notes is essential. It is also essential to actually go back and look at the notes, and even review them before the next gig. I can't tell you how many times my band has had a rehearsal where we have gone back and fixed something, but then we get to the gig and literally nobody in the band remembers the fix--we just go and play it the same way we always did.
     
  19. Chiba

    Chiba Gold Supporting Member

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    As I learned from The Kids in the Hall, arrive having eaten.

    The #1 thing that drove me away from playing in bands is people that can't be respectful enough of my time to show up where they're supposed to be, when they're supposed to be there. Of course, I wouldn't have quit playing in bands if there wasn't a lot of other stuff going on, but that remains my #1 pet peeve.
     
  20. kludge

    kludge The droid you're looking for

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    This.

    My bandmates make sure I eat, because I have a nasty habit of getting busy, not eating because I'm busy, then being stupid and ineffective because I haven't eaten, and then saying I'll eat as soon as I do the thing I can't manage to do because I'm too hungry-stupid to complete the task.
     

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