Bands who got buried because of the "hair band" moniker.

johnsav

Senior Member
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1,508
They didn't form in a traditional sense. They were brought together as hired guns for a project. they weren't prior friends, etc,
And that's why The Eagles are like boy bands?
Riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight.
 

BADHAK

Member
Messages
9,153
Serious case of 'truck drivers in drag' going on there.



I have a soft spot for them. Marc was apparently an insufferable GAK monster. But mainly they couldn't escape their general sound.



They were pretty good. The album production was terrible, but they were probably the closest of the lot to being able to go toward a Janes Addiction direction.



Ozzy had a moment. Witness the shot in the dark video for what appears to be a white sequin gown. But it passed.



Far out, I can tell that sounds bad just reading it. Another reason I'm glad I never listen to that abomination of a band.



You keep telling yourself that.
Def Leppard were a part of the NWOBHM of the late 70,'s/early 80's and they morphed into a hugely successful commercial hard rock band. They never did the hairspray/mascara/LA Glam look. If your definition of hair bands is every single hard rock band of the 80's, you may as well lump everybody in there....VH, Aerosmith, Iron Maiden etc
 

Defendant

Member
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6,622
Def Leppard were a part of the NWOBHM of the late 70,'s/early 80's and they morphed into a hugely successful commercial hard rock band. They never did the hairspray/mascara/LA Glam look. If your definition of hair bands is every single hard rock band of the 80's, you may as well lump everybody in there....VH, Aerosmith, Iron Maiden etc
Right.

So: no spandex or heavy makeup -just a bit of foundation. And a milder addiction to hairspray.

Not Poison for sure, but not Springsteen’s E Street band either.

Then there’s the MUSIC: monster gated snare, rockman abuse, all manner of post-van Halen shrieks and widdles, stacked vocals, power ballads ...are they missing anything from the hair metal playbook at all?

If anything they were sonically more hair metal than many of the bands mentioned in this thread that looked more hair metal.

You can nwobhm away to yourself all you want, but from Pyromania to Slang DL were DEFINITELY a hair metal band.
 
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BADHAK

Member
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9,153
Right.

So: no spandex or heavy makeup -just a bit of foundation. And a milder addiction to hairspray.

Not Poison for sure, but not Springsteen’s E Street band either.

Then there’s the MUSIC: monster gated snare, rockman abuse, all manner of post-van Helen shrieks and widdles, stacked vocals ...are they missing anything from the hair metal playbook at all?

If anything they were sonically more hair metal than many of the bands mentioned in this thread that looked more hair metal.

You can nwobhm away to yourself all you want, but from Pyromania to Slang DL were DEFINITELY a hair metal band.
Lots of 80's bands had gated snares.
Boston invented the Rockman and stacked vocal so they must be hair metal too ?
It was the 80's, every hard rock band from Priest, Maiden, Aerosmith, VH yadayada had widdly shrieks, lots of hair, are they hair metal ??
Springsteen barely even plays rock, so why bring it into a discussion about the hard rock of the era ??
And Pyromania wasn't a hair metal album. The term wasn't even invented. You've rendered the term meaningless
 

VanWhelan

Member
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1,072
When I saw the title of the thread, these guys were the first band that came to my mind:



At the time, I think that their hair kind of overshadowed anything else about them. They definitely weren't hair metal, they were just a rock (or pop) band who, like many other bands, adopted the look of the times. I think what did them in was their timing - just as they started to hit it big, along came Nirvana's Nevermind album & the whole grunge movement that changed music seemingly overnight.

I saw Nelson years later, performing with their Scrap Metal band at the 2007 Gibson Custom Shop open house weekend. I enjoyed their performance & thought that they did a great job. Matthew & Gunnar are really good singers with their vocal harmonies. And I've seen plenty of other videos on YouTube where they play some of their Dad's old tunes (one with James Burton playing lead), and they do a really good job. They were just a rock band that probably had some of the worst timing in the world. But I like them & would definitely go check out one of their shows again.
 

Defendant

Member
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6,622
Lots of 80's bands had gated snares.
Boston invented the Rockman and stacked vocal so they must be hair metal too ?
It was the 80's, every hard rock band from Priest, Maiden, Aerosmith, VH yadayada had widdly shrieks, lots of hair, are they hair metal ??
Springsteen barely even plays rock, so why bring it into a discussion about the hard rock of the era ??
And Pyromania wasn't a hair metal album. The term wasn't even invented. You've rendered the term meaningless
My point about Springsteen related to the hair metal look. No-one would mistake DL for a middle of the road 80s radio rock or new wave band. Consider this: If 87 Bon Jovi walked onstage in 87 DLs stage clothes and hair no-one would have batted an eyelid. But if Huey Lewis and the news did, everyone would have wondered why they were in hair band drag.

Look, it’s simple. Get enough ticks in the ledger and you’re hair metal.

eg:

Aerosmith got the drum sound and had Des Child write them ballads. But the guitar playing was nowhere near 80s hair metal standard and there’s nothing particularly metal derived to their sound. Fail.

Iron Maiden and priest suffered moments of spandex and had their guitar players ramp up the widdles to 80s standard but stayed away from power ballads and kept in the metal lane overall. The lyrics about old wars and sex with men also weren’t standard issue hair metal. Fail.

DL had the power ballads, the processed guitar sounds, the post Van Halen guitar antics, the silly drums, the metal-lite sound, the stage moves, the hair...

Etc.
 

Baba

Silver Supporting Member
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7,350
Lots of people mistake Lifeson’s tone on Power Windows as simply a Rockman, but he used the GK CPL2000 preamp. In fact, his concert rig was that preamp into a Mesa Strategy 400 power amp around that time.
Far out, I can tell that sounds bad just reading it. Another reason I'm glad I never listen to that abomination of a band.
You do know that Lifeson refers to Alex Lifeson, who played in the band Rush, and if so, did you just call Rush an "abomination of a band"?

 

k tone

Member
Messages
497
Lots of people mistake Lifeson’s tone on Power Windows as simply a Rockman, but he used the GK CPL2000 preamp. In fact, his concert rig was that preamp into a Mesa Strategy 400 power amp around that time.
I saw the Power Windows tour and it was Lifeson and Lee playing keyboards with their hands and bass pedals with their feet. Did not like.

My first concert was Rush’s Moving Pictures. That was epic.
 

Defendant

Member
Messages
6,622
You do know that Lifeson refers to Alex Lifeson, who played in the band Rush, and if so, did you just call Rush an "abomination of a band"?

I’d be happy to walk you through it with examples, but it would require disparaging talk of a recently deceased guy on my part. So best to leave it for a while.
 

Bankston

Member
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16,213
Def Leppard were a part of the NWOBHM of the late 70,'s/early 80's and they morphed into a hugely successful commercial hard rock band. They never did the hairspray/mascara/LA Glam look. If your definition of hair bands is every single hard rock band of the 80's, you may as well lump everybody in there....VH, Aerosmith, Iron Maiden etc
Def Leppard were considered part of the NWOBHM but really they were influenced by British glam acts like T. Rex and Mott the Hoople. Pyromania was heavily copied by the L.A. glam bands.

I agree with drawing a distinction between bands that were L.A. Glam Metal and other bands. Def Leppard were not a "hair band," but they did play the glam game just like most hard rock acts did in the 80's:

 

Bankston

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16,213
The one hard rock band that managed to enjoy huge success in the 80's without changing their image was AC/DC.
 

Baba

Silver Supporting Member
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7,350
I’d be happy to walk you through it with examples, but it would require disparaging talk of a recently deceased guy on my part. So best to leave it for a while.
To each, their own, I guess.

Having said that, you will NEVER be able to "walk me through it with examples", mostly because I am a Rush nut, but I can also "walk you through it with examples" of why they are (universally) one of the best bands to ever play rock music.

We're all entitled to our opinions, and, quite frankly, I don't particularly enjoy the Rolling Stones, for example, but I would never dream to go as far as to call them anything but, and nothing short of, LEGENDARY.
 

markjsmith

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,665
Is that you on lead on the second song ? Great playing !! This whole era passed me by so I've been listening to a lot of the stuff that's been posted. This is the first song I've liked. Most of it just sounds like very slight variations on the same thing - great musicians, dreadful songs and they all look like they've been designed by committees.
Yes, short break near the beginning and 1st half of the solo, 2nd half is Geoff Gayer(the original guitarist) then me again and a quick harmony lick. Geoff quit the band briefly (why I ended up recording) and I ended up on 3 tunes. To be honest this stuff was fun but not really my thing as I'd been mostly doing acoustic based music for a while which is why I never fully "joined" the band. Geoff re-joined the band again and toured the record in Europe where the band broke up again, and got back together again, and broke up again, etc..... They'd been together since they were in Junior high! Lot of baggage there! Nice guys but keeping a band together is hard! I think they have a couple guys from Shrapnel records in the band now (shredder guys)!
 

WildRanger

Member
Messages
885
I tend to hate on both hair metal and nu-metal for different reasons. In general I don't care about metal anymore, but when I was into it, it felt like Thrash metal and "plain old metal" that wasn't cheesy or poppy enough to be hair metal was what authentically defined the genre. Many were cool with Ozzy or Iron Maiden but not Winger or Warrant.

I grew up during grunge and nu-metal myself. The hair metal thing was already considered a joke by youth culture. However, while I flirted with some nu-metal stuff I quickly became disenchanted with it. It felt cool to discover Maralyn Manson or Korn or Tool when you were 14. But then things got really saturated and poser-infested quick and it basically became music for dumb young dudes that was mindlessly followed as a trend.

The Korn strain of bands gave away to abominable stuff like Limp Biscuit and Kid Rock. By the time Maralyn Manson tried to reinvent himself as David Bowie I was starting to lose interest in the goth industrial type of scene, which gave way to ridiculous hype over bands like Mushroomhead and Kitty. Then bands like Lincoln Park and Papa Roach basically completely neutered nu-metal into being weak pop music. I hated them at the outset. They came at about the same time as a flood of very generic and formulated bands like Staind and Creed. I hated it. I felt like metal was supposed to be like early Metallica or Sepultura. Not stuff with a *whiny* vocal aesthetic or with watered down guitar and drum parts.
I think Deftones and System of a Down were the only good bands from nu metal era.
 

markjsmith

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,665
I saw the Power Windows tour and it was Lifeson and Lee playing keyboards with their hands and bass pedals with their feet. Did not like.

My first concert was Rush’s Moving Pictures. That was epic.
Mine too and it was awesome!!!!
 




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