• The Gear Page Apparel & Merch Shop is Open!

    Based on member demand, The Gear Page is pleased to announce that our Apparel Merch Shop is now open. The shop’s link is in the blue Navigation bar (on the right side), “Shop,” with t-shirts, hats, neck buffs, and stickers to start. Here’s the direct link: www.thegearpageshop.com

    You’ll find exclusive high-quality apparel and merchandise; all items are ethical, sustainably produced, and we will be continuously sourcing and adding new choices. 

    We can ship internationally. All shipping is at cost.


Bass (guitar) EQ suggestions

9fingers

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,773
I am mixing down a song with drums/percussion, bass, one electric guitar, some keys & various vocals & harmonies (not a super dense arrangement). The bass guitar sounds great through the monitors (Yamaha MSP5s) but comes across a little too "thick & wooly" over cheaper speakers & mediocre car stereos. I could use some EQ suggestions to clarify the bass guitar sound through average or below speakers. The bass parts are in the low E through middle G range.
 

oldhousescott

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,814
You could start with a high-pass filter somewhere between 40-55 Hz. This will tighten up the bass and remove the low rumble that most systems can't handle anyway. I think of wooliness as between 250-500 Hz. Sweep a bell filter with the level boosted by 10dB or so until you find the offending freq, then cut that freq just enough to thin it out. Your track might also benefit from a low shelf cut of a couple of dB set around 80-120 Hz.

Another option is to apply multi-band compression, but that can be a bear to set up and get right.
 

Silent Sound

Member
Messages
5,238
Your problem is probably room modes. If you're room hasn't been properly treated, it can make the bass sound all kinds of funky and make certain frequencies jump out and others disappear. Then, as you mix, you don't realize that's what you're hearing, so you mix the bass in a way that makes it sound good in the room you mixed it in, but terrible in just about any other room. So treating the room with bass traps is the easiest way to fix that. Next would be to hook up a second set of speakers in a second room to quickly test your mix out on and see if your mix holds up in the second room. But you have to switch back and forth frequently for this to do you much good. Third would be to get some headphones with a flat low end. There aren't many headphones that do this well, but maybe if you had a few different pairs to switch between you could get a clearer picture of what's going on down there. It also helps to have some reference material on hand to check your mix against.

Forget about formulas or which frequencies or stuff like that. Which frequencies you need to cut and which you need to boost will change depending on the style of song, the way the song is played, the gear the song was recorded with, and the room it was recorded in (if not a DI), etc. So what worked best for someone else, is probably not going to work best for you. But there are some general rules of thumb to remember. Things like, always trim as much of the lowest frequencies that you can get away with on all the tracks. Part of making the bass sound good is making room for the bass in all of the other instruments. I remember being absolutely shocked by how thin all of my favorite guitar recordings sounded once I actually paid attention to them! They seemed huge, but if you listen closely, they're always thin and nasally. But by making the guitars so thin, you leave room for making the bass sound huge! Then, you make the guitars SEEM huge by making them blend seamlessly with the bass guitar by way of composition. You also want to carve out room out of the bass for the kick drum. If things sound muddy and indistinct, and can't seem to get loud enough to cut through the mix, then you probably need to carve out some room in something with some EQ.
 

9fingers

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,773
I should have clarified more. I have already done high pass filters on all tracks to eliminate low rumble. I did a high pass on the bass about 50 Hz. The guitar is already nicely thinned out to sit well in its own spot in the mix. Everything is nicely separated and there is plenty of bass guitar. The bass sounds great on decent 8" stereo speakers in the same room I am mixing in. It just gets too thick tone-wise on crappy speaker systems. I have 6 different "grades" of speakers that I check a mix with. All is quite good except for that one problem on inferior speakers (which a LOT of people listen on).
I will check that area between 250 & 500 Hz & do some more sweeping.
Thanks!
 

jmoose

Member
Messages
4,869
Wooly is generally in the 150-250 range, almost always have to put a slight to moderate notch in there. The "moooo" zone.

Can't remember the last time I had to HP bass, like... never... if anything I'm boosting at 40-60 cycles. Rare that I cut the fundamental off.

Articulation is generally 800-1kHz or so. Boost & cuts here make a large difference in how it sits in the mix.

Unless there's quite a bit of distortion involved there's generally not much of anything past 3kHz or so. String noise?

Don't be afraid to lean on a compressor to even it out...

YMMV.
 




Trending Topics

Top