Bassman '59 Ri - with a fake Valve??

Barenik

Member
Messages
34
Hallo everybody,
and sorry for my poor english.
Today I bougth an old Fender Bassman 59 Reissue, probably of the 90'.
Sounds good, but when I was arrived at home and I open it, i discover a strange surprise.
It looks it has a "fake" valve as in the pictures:

32027546091_9aae2172a5_o.jpg


31335960533_7727340071_o.jpg



32027548971_ebc2d0afe9_o.jpg


32027547871_3274041445_o.jpg



It's normal or not?





Thanks everybody!!
 

tmac

Goldmember
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
2,342
yep, fake. But not a massive FAIL.
It's a solid state rectifier replacement for a tube rectifier. It's normal if it's the proper one for the job and tubes are biased properly.

...But you missed the fake switch above it that's not doing anything but taking up space.
 

tmac

Goldmember
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
2,342
make sure when you plug it back in that the key lines up with the slot (like a tube would)
 

Jorge Vergara

Member
Messages
20
the 90'.
Sounds good, but when I was arrived at home and I open it, i discover a strange surprise.
It looks it has a "fake" valve as in the pictures:

It's normal or not?
Thanks everybody!!

Looks like a Solid State Rectifier.

The old '59 Bassman reissue in the early '90s have a solid state rectifier, plywood cabinet, Eminence Blue Frame Alnico speaker and tweed without tint and lacquer.

The LTD edition started around 1995 and came with 5AR4 rectifier tube, a BIAS pot for adjust, solid pine finger-joint wood cabinet and lacquered tweed + Jensen P10R Alnico Speakers.

I'm not shure if your amp is from the early '90s because i can see have Jensen Speakers, but in the circuit i don't watch the blue BIAS pot.


Regard :)
 

Fuzz_Mountain

Member
Messages
9,035
Yes that is a plug in solid state rectifier. Try it like that and with a tube and see what you like better. Enjoy!
 

Ryan Donahue

Member
Messages
258
yep, fake. But not a massive FAIL.
It's a solid state rectifier replacement for a tube rectifier. It's normal if it's the proper one for the job and tubes are biased properly.

...But you missed the fake switch above it that's not doing anything but taking up space.

Huh, I see the un-wired switch. Would this have been modified or did Fender put a faux switch in there for some reason in the '90s?
 

VaughnC

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
19,051
Huh, I see the un-wired switch. Would this have been modified or did Fender put a faux switch in there for some reason in the '90s?
The original Bassman had a ground switch and a "death capacitor" to help with line noise when everything had 2 wire power cords. So, to make the reissue amp look like and be safer than an original Bassman, Fender eliminated the death cap but just installed the unconnected ground switch to fill the hole and installed a safer 3 wire power cord.
 
Last edited:

Ryan Donahue

Member
Messages
258
The original Bassman had a ground switch and a "death capacitor" to help with line noise when everything had 2 wire power cords. So, to make the reissue amp look like and be safer than an original Bassman, Fender eliminated the death cap but just installed the unconnected ground switch to fill the hole and installed a safer 3 wire power cord.

Ahh, okay. I've heard about the death cap before but didn't know how it was eliminated. Thanks.
 

SgtThump

Member
Messages
8,185
The original Bassman had a ground switch and a "death capacitor" to help with line noise when everything had 2 wire power cords. So, to make the reissue amp look like and be safer than an original Bassman, Fender eliminated the death cap but just installed the unconnected ground switch to fill the hole and installed a safer 3 wire power cord.

For real? Thats weird.
 

Jorge Vergara

Member
Messages
20
Try to replace the 12AX7 in V1 with a NOS 12AY7. The originals have this tube and i love it.

The originals use a pair of 6L6 on Power, reissues use 6L6GC. The 6L6 has a lower power rating (25 watts) vs. the 6L6GC's (30 watts).

Regards :)
 

Barenik

Member
Messages
34
Try to replace the 12AX7 in V1 with a NOS 12AY7. The originals have this tube and i love it.

The originals use a pair of 6L6 on Power, reissues use 6L6GC. The 6L6 has a lower power rating (25 watts) vs. the 6L6GC's (30 watts).

Regards :)

Thanks for suggestions!

If I change the ss with a tube, I have to do any work before (or after) or I have only to substitute?
What kind of tube I have to put on it?

Thank you!!
 

VaughnC

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
19,051
If you replace the SS rectifier with a tube, or vice-versa, it changes the power supply voltage. Which means that the bias should be checked to make sure the output tubes aren't running too hot or cold. Too cold, and the amp can sound stiff & lifeless (but won't do any damage), too hot and the tubes can actually melt...which can give you problems at a gig when you least need them, and good tubes aren't cheap. So, it's a good idea to have your bias checked when replacing rectifier's or output tubes...or learn how to do it yourself.
 




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