Be Glad Mesa is in Gibson's Family and not FMIC

DocJeff

Active Member
Messages
27
Gibson receives bashing on an hourly basis. I am still glad that Mesa Boogie is now squarely in Gibson's camp instead of FMIC.

Gibson has made the decision to keep their most prestigious brand made in America. Not only that, every Gibson guitar also has a lacquer finish. What is remarkable is that Gibson offers high quality American made guitars at very competitive price points when you consider the labor and taxes that they pay.

A faded Gibson Les Paul or SG is a professional instrument and most of them sound very good. While they may not have the bling that their Asian made competition has in 99/100 cases the Gibson will sound better and hold more of its value.

The recent 2020 crop of Gibson guitars has been fantastic. We've seen models that many have requested, such as a non-Historic Les Paul Special in TV Yellow with a 50s neck profile. Add in the hard case and included PLEK job, although being an experienced luthier I couldn't care less about that, and for the money it's a very good deal sure to appreciate in value.

Mesa Boogie is a premium brand. As an amplifier designer as well as a collector I have seen and played through hundreds of high quality amplifiers. Mesa Boogie has a fairly (for the layman) complex design but for the most part are reliable, sound great and have a very good reputation.

FMIC seems to get a pass because they're willing to placate the masses by putting the once iconic Fender name on any piece of junk they can. Recently on a visit to the local Guitar-Mart I saw some of the newer Fender branded guitars. They looked toy like and, as I expected, were made oversees.

This isn't to say that FMIC doesn't make anything good. I have a wonderful Elliot Easton Gretsch guitar and a 1956 Fender Custom Shop Stratocaster. Both are exceptional instruments that have appeared on dozens of recordings and have been through about 1000 live gigs. I also own a 1986 Jackson Soloist. The modern versions are not even close in quality as the Jackson name is nothing anymore.

Look at the recent imported Fender amplifiers and ask yourself if you would like to see a proud name like Mesa Boogie defiled the way the Twin, Vibrolux and Princeton have been. Even the tolex looks like a child's cheap toy. If it could be guaranteed that the Fender Custom Shop would have built Mesa Boogie products alongside the Vibro King maybe it would have looked better. Thankfully, the name Mesa Boogie has been spared.

As a professional recording engineer I was disappointed to hear that Gibson had done a poor job with Opcode, but being a Pro Tools user I can say that chances are it was survival of the fittest. Kramer and Steinberger were put out to pasture because of modern music styles. Maybe they'll regain their greatness one day soon.

At the end of the day let's all be thankful Mesa Boogie didn't end up with the destroyer of icons, FMIC.
 

xmd5a

Member
Messages
2,406
One person's defiled is another mans affordable. I have a few Fender re-issues, and they've been good. Mesa Boogie has a strong brand image, a lot of people would throw some money there way if they offered an amp that fit their paycheck. Orange, Vox and Marshall have also figured out how to thread that needle.

I had a lot of trouble with a Twin Reverb RI, I had to open it up several times before it was finally fixed. It was an intermittent problem, so even the amp tech was stumped. Turns out it was that the prongs that hold the fuse in place were holding the fuse loosely, so the amp would lose power because it couldn't pull enough current or something like that. I could dump of Fender for allowing this QC oversight, but it was an intermittent, mechanical issue, a QC guy wouldn't realize it unless they spent a week or two with the amp. I think that sort of thing could have happened back in the 60's. I bet if someone were to legitimately catalog the reliability of 60's Fenders to modern Fenders, the newer PCB based one would still probably have fewer service calls overall, for the simple fact that there are fewer human hands involved, less human error in sum total.
 

tonedover

This Is Fine.
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
6,150
Gibson receives bashing on an hourly basis. I am still glad that Mesa Boogie is now squarely in Gibson's camp instead of FMIC.

Gibson has made the decision to keep their most prestigious brand made in America. Not only that, every Gibson guitar also has a lacquer finish. What is remarkable is that Gibson offers high quality American made guitars at very competitive price points when you consider the labor and taxes that they pay.

A faded Gibson Les Paul or SG is a professional instrument and most of them sound very good. While they may not have the bling that their Asian made competition has in 99/100 cases the Gibson will sound better and hold more of its value.

The recent 2020 crop of Gibson guitars has been fantastic. We've seen models that many have requested, such as a non-Historic Les Paul Special in TV Yellow with a 50s neck profile. Add in the hard case and included PLEK job, although being an experienced luthier I couldn't care less about that, and for the money it's a very good deal sure to appreciate in value.

Mesa Boogie is a premium brand. As an amplifier designer as well as a collector I have seen and played through hundreds of high quality amplifiers. Mesa Boogie has a fairly (for the layman) complex design but for the most part are reliable, sound great and have a very good reputation.

FMIC seems to get a pass because they're willing to placate the masses by putting the once iconic Fender name on any piece of junk they can. Recently on a visit to the local Guitar-Mart I saw some of the newer Fender branded guitars. They looked toy like and, as I expected, were made oversees.

This isn't to say that FMIC doesn't make anything good. I have a wonderful Elliot Easton Gretsch guitar and a 1956 Fender Custom Shop Stratocaster. Both are exceptional instruments that have appeared on dozens of recordings and have been through about 1000 live gigs. I also own a 1986 Jackson Soloist. The modern versions are not even close in quality as the Jackson name is nothing anymore.

Look at the recent imported Fender amplifiers and ask yourself if you would like to see a proud name like Mesa Boogie defiled the way the Twin, Vibrolux and Princeton have been. Even the tolex looks like a child's cheap toy. If it could be guaranteed that the Fender Custom Shop would have built Mesa Boogie products alongside the Vibro King maybe it would have looked better. Thankfully, the name Mesa Boogie has been spared.

As a professional recording engineer I was disappointed to hear that Gibson had done a poor job with Opcode, but being a Pro Tools user I can say that chances are it was survival of the fittest. Kramer and Steinberger were put out to pasture because of modern music styles. Maybe they'll regain their greatness one day soon.

At the end of the day let's all be thankful Mesa Boogie didn't end up with the destroyer of icons, FMIC.
um. sure. your opinion is as good as anyone elses, and mine is that your post is about 90% wrong

and as a bonus it makes u come across sounding like a real gasbag and a bizarre gibson crusader,

if this is how your posts are gonna be around here, you arent gonna find many allies.
 

D K Souther

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
483
Gibson receives bashing on an hourly basis. I am still glad that Mesa Boogie is now squarely in Gibson's camp instead of FMIC.

Gibson has made the decision to keep their most prestigious brand made in America. Not only that, every Gibson guitar also has a lacquer finish. What is remarkable is that Gibson offers high quality American made guitars at very competitive price points when you consider the labor and taxes that they pay.

A faded Gibson Les Paul or SG is a professional instrument and most of them sound very good. While they may not have the bling that their Asian made competition has in 99/100 cases the Gibson will sound better and hold more of its value.

The recent 2020 crop of Gibson guitars has been fantastic. We've seen models that many have requested, such as a non-Historic Les Paul Special in TV Yellow with a 50s neck profile. Add in the hard case and included PLEK job, although being an experienced luthier I couldn't care less about that, and for the money it's a very good deal sure to appreciate in value.

Mesa Boogie is a premium brand. As an amplifier designer as well as a collector I have seen and played through hundreds of high quality amplifiers. Mesa Boogie has a fairly (for the layman) complex design but for the most part are reliable, sound great and have a very good reputation.

FMIC seems to get a pass because they're willing to placate the masses by putting the once iconic Fender name on any piece of junk they can. Recently on a visit to the local Guitar-Mart I saw some of the newer Fender branded guitars. They looked toy like and, as I expected, were made oversees.

This isn't to say that FMIC doesn't make anything good. I have a wonderful Elliot Easton Gretsch guitar and a 1956 Fender Custom Shop Stratocaster. Both are exceptional instruments that have appeared on dozens of recordings and have been through about 1000 live gigs. I also own a 1986 Jackson Soloist. The modern versions are not even close in quality as the Jackson name is nothing anymore.

Look at the recent imported Fender amplifiers and ask yourself if you would like to see a proud name like Mesa Boogie defiled the way the Twin, Vibrolux and Princeton have been. Even the tolex looks like a child's cheap toy. If it could be guaranteed that the Fender Custom Shop would have built Mesa Boogie products alongside the Vibro King maybe it would have looked better. Thankfully, the name Mesa Boogie has been spared.

As a professional recording engineer I was disappointed to hear that Gibson had done a poor job with Opcode, but being a Pro Tools user I can say that chances are it was survival of the fittest. Kramer and Steinberger were put out to pasture because of modern music styles. Maybe they'll regain their greatness one day soon.

At the end of the day let's all be thankful Mesa Boogie didn't end up with the destroyer of icons, FMIC.
well, as an amp designer, collector and professional recording engineer you’d know.
 

ekafroops

Member
Messages
316
um. sure. your opinion is as good as anyone elses, and mine is that your post is about 90% wrong

and as a bonus it makes u come across sounding like a real gasbag and a bizarre gibson crusader,

if this is how your posts are gonna be around here, you arent gonna find many allies.
Allyship in the era of the Great Posting Wars.
 

Lt Dak

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,104
I bought my first Mesa a few months ago, and am glad I picked it up when I did. I don't put money in Gibson's pockets.

I hope it works out for the employees at Mesa. Sadly, I have my doubts.
 

AprioriMark

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,554
Look what happens when other places to anonymously vent ridiculousness are gone. It makes me wonder what forums suffered our wrath the other day when TGP was down. Did cooking forums have an uptick of threads concerned with the transparency of saffron? Did Home Depot comments look like, "if you can afford it, do it!" and "does this Whirlpool look real?"

On point, Mesa is more at home with Gibson than Fender. Something something historic build weaknesses something something.

-Mark
 
Messages
4,019
I haven’t pulled a new Gibson down off the wall in a musical instruments shop in ages, so I can’t comment on that. Robo-Tuners was what? 2015? Whenever that was a thing, I pulled one down, noticed the brass nut, realized what I’d grabbed, put it back on the wall.

Fender, Jackson and Charvel are all making really good Mexican and American guitars right now, so I vehemently disagree with the OP there.

He’s got an axe to grind and it doesn’t involve a vibrato bridge.
 

Average Joe

Member
Messages
11,712
I dunno, Fender has a somewhat better track record doing viable things with their subsidiary brands. Gretsch enthusiasts generally believe the current line is as good as any put out under that name, Jacksons and Charvels are filling a nice niche in the market, Guild have had a rough going finding a market but then they had the same problem as an independent company.....

MIJ isn't necessarily bad.


Gibson's track record is pretty bad by comparison - how can the owner of the OG headless design not revive Steinberger at a time where headless guitars are more popular than ever, just to take one example?



I'd prefer Mesa to be independent, but so it goes.
 




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