Beam Blockers- yea or nay?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by Crunchyriff, Mar 12, 2006.


  1. Crunchyriff

    Crunchyriff Member

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    I've been intrigued by this concept. Anybody using these, and if so, on what type of guitar cabs and what music applications?

    What are the negatives, if any?

    I'm a rock and pop player, and use Marshall JMP, Mesa Tremoverb, and V32 Palomino amps. Maybe this will help in your responses for my needs.

    Thanks!
     
  2. cap'n'crunch

    cap'n'crunch Member

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    As Old Tele Man suggested already.
    It's easy enough and cheap enough to find out if they are for you.
    Get some shoebox cardboard and cut some circles that are about 4" in diameter (experiment with different sizes) and tape them over your speaker with double sided tape. Then you'll know. The actual Weber Beam Blockers might be a little different but, you'll get the basic idea. SRV supposedly used duct tape on his speaker grill(s).

    Actually there was a discussion about these a few weeks ago. Click the search button above and type in "beam blockers".
     
  3. GenoBluzGtr

    GenoBluzGtr Supporting Member

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    They really killed the "ice pick" from my Super Reverb. I was always turning down the Treb and the Mid up until I tried the beam blockers. Now I can get the high tones I like without my sound guy shooting me.
     
  4. twoheadedboy

    twoheadedboy Member

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    I love them for certain speakers and certain amps. It depends on the character of the high end. Some amps have a more rounded off high end that doesn't really get too icepicky or shrill. Those amps will probably sound a little dull and muffled with a beam blocker. However, some amps that really toss icepicks in the high end can benefit from a beam blocker, like Fenders that get really shrill when you turn them up. Also, some Celestion speakers such as Vintage 30s can be overly fizzy for distorted sounds without a beam blocker, but once you get a beam blocker on them, they smooth out nicely and sound a lot fatter.

    Basically, the beam blocker sends some of the highs back into the cone where they are redistributed and mixed with the rest of the sound instead of sitting on top of it.
     
  5. Scott Peterson

    Scott Peterson Staff Member

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    I really like them. Kills the shrill direct line from the speaker; keeps the tone. No negatives to report.
     
  6. 908SSP

    908SSP Member

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    The thickness is .050 I forgot a zero. :D

    [​IMG]
     
  7. GenoBluzGtr

    GenoBluzGtr Supporting Member

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    The Beam Blockers have an actual speaker voice coil cover on them. They install with the Convex (rounded ) side TOWARD the speaker cone. this is what creates the smoother re-distribution of the highs back into the mids/bass that come primarily from the larger speaker cone.

    I don't know how important the shape is, but the material is also paper... just like a paper speaker cone. Not sure how different the homemade versions will sound, but it might make a big difference.

    Besides, at $15 each, it's hard to beat the price and quality.
     
  8. 59model

    59model Member

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    Just get a speaker that doesn`t kill you with it`s harsh highs.
     
  9. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    I'm a fan. Whether you need 'em really depends on the speaker. Some, like Red Fangs, sound great unless you're in line with them, when they'll take your head off. Pop on a beam blocker, you lose the agonizing shrillness or roughness. Ditto Fanes. But the best way to tell is to listen to your speakers off axis, then directly on axis. If you hear the ice-pick on axis, try out the beam blockers. Great product for a great price.
     
  10. 908SSP

    908SSP Member

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    Let's see 30 times $15 is $450 hmmm....make my own cost $8 for 30 hmmm......Yes I have 30 installed and a pile of spares.
     
  11. Stevo57

    Stevo57 Supporting Member

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    They work great and should be included with some speakers like C12N's for instance. The definition of ice picks.
     
  12. Crunchyriff

    Crunchyriff Member

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    Thanks gang!

    Hmm..interesting.

    FWIW, my speakers are an assortment of 70's Fane Crescendoes (2 2x12 cabs), 70's Celestion G12-65's ('78 Marshall 4x12 cab), a G12H30 70th Annv in my V32; V30's in the TOV, and soon to be acquired (in transit) Celestion Heritage G12H's.
     
  13. sideman

    sideman Member

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    I love my C12Ns! You can also use duct tape, or just turn the amp around so it faces backwards.
     
  14. Stevo57

    Stevo57 Supporting Member

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    I know some folks love C12N's and I'm cool with it. My ears like blues and HP75s. I had a BF Bandmaster that came with those in the cab. Man that thing shot daggers when you were in front of it.
     
  15. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    THis is really good advice. I would just change it slightly to say, "listen to your speakers off-axis, then directly on axis. If you hear a big difference with more treble on axis, you want to at least try the beam blockers".

    Doesn't have to be ice-pick because these aren't just to correct "problem sounds" the way I see them. They are to even it out so the sound you hear as the guitarist...(usually off-axis...you are standing a good deal higher than the speakers usually) as you adjust your tone, is the same sound the guy in the front row (who is directly in line with some of the speakers) will hear...or at least closer.

    I just wanted to be clear that these are used for more than just problem sounds, but to get better accuracy by removing the difference that off and on axis make.
     
  16. marrelero

    marrelero Member

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    I agree on what StompBocBlues just said;

    "...to even it out so the sound you hear as the guitarist...(usually off-axis...you are standing a good deal higher than the speakers usually) as you adjust your tone, is the same sound the guy in the front row (who is directly in line with some of the speakers) will hear...or at least closer. "

    I've got beamblockers in my 2x12 cab loaded with v30 and after I installed them I noticed that the sound just was more even, either if I was standing near the cab or say 5 meters from it. Recommended product!
     
  17. GenoBluzGtr

    GenoBluzGtr Supporting Member

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    Didn't mean to strike a nerve 908SSP, just stating that beam blocker's are great values for what they do.

    I would assume that if you can afford to own cabs or combos totalling up to 30 speakers, an extra $15 per speaker shouldn't put you in the poor house. Besides, I can't imagine ALL 30 of your speakers would need to be beamblocked to sound good. Alot of speakers sound great without them.

    I have never heard what the "homemade" flat ones do, but there is a big difference in construction without the convex paper cone facing back at the speaker. I can say from experience that I tried the duct tape thing before I got the beamblockers and there IS a difference in the effect.

    The Duct Tape blocked the highs when I was "on axis", but off axis, there was a bit more "mud" to my ears. When I put on the beam blockers, it seemed to "remix" the highs smoothly back into the sound, which I assume has to do with the convex paper cone reflector in action.
     
  18. 908SSP

    908SSP Member

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    You didn't. I just wanted to point out the huge difference in price if making them yourself is an option.

    I might worry about not using them if I didn't need them if the cost was $15 since they don't need to cost $15 I use them. I have tested before and after and I like them with better with then without so now I tend to just use them as a mater of course.

    Thanks for the info that those domes are paper I didn't know that. I might order some paper domes from the speaker coner replacement suppliers I doubt they cost a $1 a piece. :AOK
     
  19. hasserl

    hasserl Member

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    Alex, how are you cutting those out? Looks too nice to be done with hand held shears! ;)

    I've got a couple of guys that do sheetmetal work, maybe I can get them to cut a few for me.
     
  20. djinn1973

    djinn1973 Member

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    And on that note, I am off to pick one up right now... by the way, who ever thought of adding the google custom search is a genius.
     

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