Beatles: Anyone know the EXACT opening chord

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by dave s, Sep 1, 2006.

  1. dave s

    dave s Member

    Messages:
    6,160
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    to the Beatles song, Hard Day's Night?

    Would be really helpful if someone could post the correct fingerings on the strings to the chord for me. Guess my ears just ain't what they used to be!

    Thank you!!!

    dave
     
  2. Coach

    Coach Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,114
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Location:
    ND
    aren't there 3 different instruments lending tones to make that chord?
     
  3. billyguitar

    billyguitar Member

    Messages:
    4,468
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Location:
    Kansas City
    It's described somewhere by george martin I believe as multiple guitars and a piano I think. The closest I can get is at the third fret playing a G sus4-.
    low to high:
    G on low E string
    D on A string
    G on D string
    C on G string
    D on B string
    G on high E string.
     
  4. scottlr

    scottlr Member

    Messages:
    22,775
    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Location:
    Born & raised in Texas; stranded in Iowa
    George Harrison played "an F with a high G" his words. It doesn't sound right on a 6 string, but it does on a 12, especially with a bass playing a D, and there was also a piano involved. The whole thing together sort of makes the Gsus4 sound right to most folks ears, but that is not really it.

    NOTE: the ending thing is the same chord as the opening. Again, doesn't work on a 6 string, but does on a 12.
     
  5. Kingpin

    Kingpin Member

    Messages:
    578
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2005
    As mentioned earlier, it really is a combination of instruments, but
    here's what I would play for a guitar chord...

    --3--
    --3--
    --5--
    --3--
    --5--
    --3--
     
  6. yZe

    yZe Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,239
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2006
    Location:
    Tampa, on the Territory of Florida (D.C. Free Zone
    Yup, this is as close as it gets w/one axe :RoCkIn
     
  7. jspax7

    jspax7 Member

    Messages:
    2,224
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2005
    Location:
    CA
    G7 sus4. Strum back by the bridge where it's real twangy.:dude
     
  8. Guinness Lad

    Guinness Lad Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    15,339
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2004
    Location:
    On top a mountain of Chocolate Chips
    This is the same chord as the intro to Led Boots by Jeff Beck off "Wired", except Beck plays B flat, then A flat, and the F and cranks the volume till the guitar feedsback. It is a suspended chord or G11 it depends some what on the voicing used.
     
  9. gennation

    gennation Member

    Messages:
    6,694
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI
    I 4th that answer.

    Now, let's see the intro to Bungalow Bill ;)
     
  10. billyguitar

    billyguitar Member

    Messages:
    4,468
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Location:
    Kansas City
    I've never noticed the 7th! I've never tried to learn it either or play along.
     
  11. gennation

    gennation Member

    Messages:
    6,694
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Formula wise though, the G11 would need to include the A also as the 9 (R M3 5 b7 9 11).

    I think Ted Greene would call it a G7sus11 ;)
     
  12. scottlr

    scottlr Member

    Messages:
    22,775
    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Location:
    Born & raised in Texas; stranded in Iowa
    http://everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=1718612
    THIS is the chord George played, and the theory of what the others played. But the chord George played was told, by him, in an interview. AND he can be seen playing that chord on a few live filmed performances, AND the ending bit is the same chord but picked alternately. There has been a lot of controversy about this chord. The man that played told what it was and still many folks argue about it. Get a 12 string and try it. Get some friends to play the parts theorized on this site, and see if it doesn't sound correct. Then imagine that the chord was also spliced onto the beginning of the song in the editing room, and a lot of compression to boot.
     
  13. scottlr

    scottlr Member

    Messages:
    22,775
    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Location:
    Born & raised in Texas; stranded in Iowa
    Yes, and playing it on a 12 vs a 6 makes all the difference. When I first saw the interview where Harrison told the chord, I had a 360/12V64 and immediately played the chord. All by itself, it still didn't seem right, but when I played it with the record, it was so obvious, and then when I found the same chord was used for the ending bit, I was amazed at how simple that part was, once you had the chord on a 12. It just doesn't work on a 6 at all. I had been trying for decades to figure that chimey ending bit out, and couldn't believe that was all it was. But on a 6, I'd have never found it.
     
  14. scottlr

    scottlr Member

    Messages:
    22,775
    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Location:
    Born & raised in Texas; stranded in Iowa
    In the 60s, as a kid, I had a Ric 330/12 as my only guitar in the first 2 bands I ever played in. It's hard to believe now, but it was cool back then LOL But my playing really did open up quite a bit when I finally a 6 string electric instead.

    Who's the jazz guy that plays a 12? Some of that stuff is pretty cool, as I recall.
     
  15. gennation

    gennation Member

    Messages:
    6,694
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI
    A year or so ago Guitar Player magazine did a break down of that chord using scopes and even George Martin, and the Beatles "memories". It seemed WAY more complicated than the chord we all love, and play for that chord.
     
  16. gennation

    gennation Member

    Messages:
    6,694
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Maybe at a time it was piano theory, but these days it's just music theory...taught in endless schools/colleges.

    A name of G11 implies an "inclusion" chord, a chord that stacks or includes other notes as it's built. So, if someone looks up the "formula" they see R 3 5 b7 9 11...regardless of what instrument it's to be played on.

    In the case of a sax player looking for notes to play over that chord...they would use G B D F A C.

    But, if they see a G7sus11 (or a G7sus4) they would know, from music/chord theory, that that's a G C D F.

    Regardless what instrument is being played, the theory is the same.
     
  17. lhallam

    lhallam Member

    Messages:
    15,930
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Location:
    Lost
    I recall that they said there were two gtrs and a piano playing that chord.
    I don't hear the piano but that doesn't mean it's not there in the mix.
     
  18. Shades

    Shades Member

    Messages:
    3,379
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    The great northwet
  19. scottlr

    scottlr Member

    Messages:
    22,775
    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Location:
    Born & raised in Texas; stranded in Iowa
    Pretty cool, but that's not the guy I was thinking of. It'll come to me, if someone doesn't beat me to the punch.


    As for the AHDN chord, it has amazed me how folks, even thought George tells what it was, still refuse to just accept it. After trying it on my RIC 12, I was totally convinced old George DID remember the chord. Not a hard thing for him to remember. A lot of other stuff would have been easy to forget, but a single chord to open a song... well, he knew what he played, and I believe him. I saw 1964 The Tribute, and they were spot on, but the guitar player played the old Gsus4 for the song. It wasn't bad, but it wasn't correct, either. It IS:

    3
    1
    2
    3
    x
    x
    on a 12 string. And if you have a 12, alternate picking the same chord is the chimey ending riff. Period. The added studio trickery and other instruments are what gives it the total sound you hear on record. It's not a single instrument. But playing it on a 6 string will NOT convince you. It HAS to be a 12 to see/hear the difference. The original question was, what was the chord. Well, THAT is it. And I think the website I linked has a damn good theory as to the other parts played. If you don't have a 12, then try overdubbing it with the right notes doubled and octaved to simulate a 12.

    Here's a quick facsimile of a 12 string, plus the other notes, done on a tele.

    http://home.mchsi.com/~scottlr/AHDN.mp3
     
  20. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Member

    Messages:
    2,603
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
    Location:
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Wow, no kidding. I've always wondered about this. When I played and sang this tune years ago (with standard 6 string electrics), I tried a slew of different voicings, and this F add 9 grip was the only thing that sounded right to me. I tried putting the low G in the bass (via the thumb), but that didn't sound right, so it was back to the aforementioned voicing. Geez, that's twice within the last decade that I've been right... I must be on a roll.

    I didn't have a 12 at that time, but I do currently own a RIC 360/12. However, this instrument is mostly used for sessions, as there's no way that I'd care to battle that particular beast for a tune or two in the live setting, sans benefit of a personal tech.
     

Share This Page